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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 342 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 333 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 292 10 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 278 8 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 277 5 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 267 45 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 263 15 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 252 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 228 36 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 228 22 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Joseph E. Johnston or search for Joseph E. Johnston in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences. (search)
rbities engendered by it are fast being buried in the grave of Oblivion — where is the gray-headed Confederate whose eve does not kindle at the remembrance of those four heroic years? Does he not feel like re-echoing the glowing words which the great dramatist puts in the mouth of Henry the Fifth the night before Agincourt, This story shall the goodman teach his son.— The that shall live this day, and see old age, Will yearly on the vigil feast his neighbors, And say, To-morrow is Saint Crispin; Then will he strip his sleeve and show his scars, And say, These wounds I had on Crispin's day. And does not his heart burn while he tells with pride of the days when with unfaltering steps, though weary and hungry, but with the light of battle in his eye, he followed in the lead of those illustrious captains and masters of war, A. P. Hill, Jackson, Hampton, Stuart, Mosby, Johnston, Kirby Smith and a host of other gallant spirits—and last, though not least, of Robert Edward
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Officers of Gen. R. E. Lee's staff. (search)
les Marshall, A. D. C., Lieutenant Colonel A. A. & I. General, November 4, 1864–April 9, 1865. After the battle of Seven Pines, June I, 1862, in which General Jos. E. Johnston was severely wounded, General Robert E. Lee was assigned to the command of the Army of Northern Virginia, and took with him his personal staff as above named, to-wit: Long, Taylor, Talcott, Venable and Marshall. He also retained Captain A. P. Mason, A. A. & I. General, of General Johnston's staff, who in March, 1863, was at his own request transferred elsewhere, and Major Walter H. Taylor assumed his duties. Colonel Thomas Jordan, A. A. & I. General, who had served as Adjutant General of the Army of Northern Virginia under General Joseph E. Johnston, voluntarily retired with him, and was replaced by Colonel R. H. Chilton, A. A. & I. General, who was promoted Brigadier General in December, 1863, and Colonel Walter H. Taylor then became Adjutant General of the Army of Northern Virginia, which position he h
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Dedication of a bronze tablet in honor of Botetourt Battery (search)
t night the troops bivouacked in the order of march, near Edwards Depot. The next morning came a dispatch from General Joseph E. Johnston, then at Benton road, near Jackson. General Johnston's instructions were that General Pemberton should join hiGeneral Johnston's instructions were that General Pemberton should join him at once at Clinton. The countermarch was at once ordered. The reverse movement had hardly been begun when the Federals attacked, drove in the cavalry pickets, and opened at long range on the head of the column on the Raymond Road. The battle tColumbia, Franklin and Nashville, and surrendered at Salisbury, N. C., two days after the surrender of his kinsman, Joseph E. Johnston. He was a soldier all his life, and a much loved man. In this paper I have more than once quoted Gunner No. 4, Adaicksburg, after the surrender, the army was halted at noon to rest, I was lying, very sick, to one side of the road. Major Johnston—he was captain then—came riding up with some officers. He left the company sitting on their horses and came over to