Browsing named entities in Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Joseph Eggleston Johnston or search for Joseph Eggleston Johnston in all documents.

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Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: Maryland's First patriotic movement in 1861. (search)
e were the skeletons of eight companies collected at Point of Rocks: Co. A. Capt. Bradley T. Johnson. Co. B. Capt. C. C. Edelin, at Harper's Ferry. Co. C. Capt. Frank S. Price. Co. D. Capt. James R. Herbert. Co. E. Capt. Harry McCoy. Co. F. Capt. Thomas G. Holbrook. Co. G. Capt. Wilson Carey Nicholas. Co. H. Capt. Harry Welmore. They were mustered into the service of the Confederate States on May 21st and 22d by Lieut.-Col. George Deas, inspector-general on the staff of Gen. Jos. E. Johnston, who in the meantime had superseded Colonel Jackson in command at Harper's Ferry. Captain Johnson, as senior captain, refused to recognize the Virginia authorities. Relying on the promise of Mr. Mason, he insisted that the Marylanders should be received into the army of the Confederate States, and not into the army of Virginia. On May 21, 1861, Virginia was not one of the Confederate States. He believed that Maryland ought to be represented in the army by men bearing arms and her
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: Marylanders in the campaigns of 1861. (search)
ank of the generals of the Confederate army. Johnston ranked next to Lee, but was his equal in expeterritory and her feelings. When, therefore, Johnston saw the absolute necessity of holding Marylanambersburg, Pa., thirty miles to the north of Johnston, under command of Major-General Patterson. Festlessness unmistakable to an old soldier of Johnston's caliber, and the very day Johnston moved ouJohnston moved out of Harper's Ferry, Patterson marched south from Chambersburg. The former moved to Charlestown, Vaerson crossed the Potomac at Williamsport and Johnston went into line of battle at Bunker Hill, a plide. Patterson having recrossed the Potomac, Johnston fell back to Winchester, where he proceeded tspecial order for disobedience of orders. General Johnston had sent them on this detail with distincten in the day of action. By order of Gen. Joseph E. Johnston. The Confederate strategy in the t was to his own people, not to ours. Joseph E. Johnston's wife was a Maryland woman, and he, tou[3 more...]
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: Marylanders in 1862 under Generals Joseph E. Johnston and Stonewall Jackson. (search)
Chapter 6: Marylanders in 1862 under Generals Joseph E. Johnston and Stonewall Jackson. In November, 1861, Gen. Joseph E. Johnston, then in command of the Confederate army of the Potomac, withdrew from the posts of Mason's and Munson's Hills, established by Beauregard, having information that McClellan was about to sweep them in. Beauregard had established a capital secret service, and his spies in Washington, in the departments and in McClellan's headquarters, kept his headquarters perfeGen. Joseph E. Johnston, then in command of the Confederate army of the Potomac, withdrew from the posts of Mason's and Munson's Hills, established by Beauregard, having information that McClellan was about to sweep them in. Beauregard had established a capital secret service, and his spies in Washington, in the departments and in McClellan's headquarters, kept his headquarters perfectly advised of the intentions of General McClellan. They had reported in time McDowell's projected movement on Bull Run, which resulted in the first battle of Manassas. In November Johnston withdrew from the line of Fairfax Court House to Centreville, in front of Bull Run, and in a month fell back to Bull Run, where he put his troops in camp for the winter. He made his men cover themselves in log huts, which were comfortable, but too warm and illventi-lated for troops in the field. Durin
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: Maryland artillery—Second Maryland regiment infantryFirst Maryland cavalry. (search)
ce manufactured at the Tredegar works in Richmond, as far as the resources of that establishment could go. So that when the First Maryland artillery took the field, it might have been said that the whole of it, men and guns, harness and wheels, was the creation of the head and heart, the mind and will of its captain. It occupied a position on the extreme right of the Confederate line, at Shipping Point on the Potomac, where its fire effectually blockaded that river until March, 1862, when Johnston withdrew from Manassas and the line of the Potomac. In the Seven Days battles it was attached to the division of Maj.-Gen. A. P. Hill. When Lee began his movement around McClellan's right on June 26, 1862, the First Maryland artillery fired the first shots at Mechanicsville, just as the First Maryland regiment had fired the first shots against McClellan's pickets at Hundley's Corner an hour before. It was attached to Pender's North Carolina brigade, and Captain Andrews was slightly wound
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), chapter 11 (search)
ton, Ky., to within three and one-half miles of Covington. After the retreat from Kentucky was sent to Vicksburg, under General Stevenson. One section, commanded by Lieut. W. T. Patten, manned the guns of the ram Queen of the West, when the Indianola was captured, and all except four were lost when the Queen was burned. Another detachment under Lieut. Wm. L. Ritter served under Col. G. W. Ferguson on Deer Creek, assisted in capturing a large Federal transport, and was afterwards under General Johnston in the battle before Jackson, Miss. The rest of the battery remained with Pemberton, participated in the battle of Baker's Creek, fought on the Vicksburg lines and were there surrendered. Seventy-seven were paroled, and furloughed after being exchanged. Reorganized in September, 1863; went to the front at Sweetwater, Tenn., served at Lookout mountain, Missionary Ridge, and on the retreat to Dalton, Ga. Under the title of the Stephens (Georgia) light artillery, it participated in the
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
guard in the subsequent retreat. A court of inquiry relieved him of blame for the surrender of New Orleans, and Gen. J. E. Johnston in 1864 proposed to give him command of a corps, but he was not restored to the field by the government. After thinfantry, he was appointed lieutenant-colonel of that command, and by special good conduct won the commendation of Gen. J. E. Johnston in orders. He was with the regiment under Colonel Elzey during its distinguished service at the first battle of M order announcing this event, General Bragg wrote concerning Mackall: He will proceed with his aides and report to Gen. J. E. Johnston, now commanding the department from which he was transferred. With a grateful sense of the distinguished servicesthe right wing of the army of Northern Virginia, under command of General Magruder, as the army was organized by Gen. Joseph E. Johnston. Major Brent held this position until the close of the Peninsular campaign of 1862, contributing to the success