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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 72 6 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 45 9 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 21 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 12 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 3 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Robert D. Johnston or search for Robert D. Johnston in all documents.

Your search returned 39 results in 8 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General T. J. (Stonewall) Jackson, Confederate States army. (search)
s general than did the army of Jackson, and what general ever trusted and depended on his army more than Jackson? Jackson knew the value of the Southern volunteer better and sooner (as I believe) than any other of our great leaders. When General Johnston took charge at Harper's Ferry, the general staff went with the command. One day, when the 2d Virginia Regiment, composed of men from my county, marched by, I said to him: If these men of the 2d Virginia will not fight, you have no troops thl. He expressed the prevalent, but afterward changed opinion of that early day in his reply, saying: I would not give one company of regulars for the whole regiment. When I returned to General Jackson's staff I had occasion to quote to him General Johnston's opinion. Did he say that, he asked, and of those splendid men? And then he added: The patriotic volunteer, fighting for country and his rights, makes the most reliable soldier on earth. Was the confidence returned? When, at sight of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.9 (search)
. Bates, Charles Barney, Dr. C. G. Bailey, Samuel M. Cabell, Dr. J. G. Dooley, John Dudley, Thomas U. Doswell, Thomas W. Dibrell, R. H. Enders, John Exall, Henry Ellett, Andrew L. Eacho, Edward D. Edmond, Robert Ellyson, Moses Frayser, Lewis H. Glazebrook, L. W. Gatewood, Robert Goddin, Wellington Hobson, Julius A. Hackett, James H. Harrison, Samuel J. Harvey, John B. Isaacs, Wm. B. Jinkins, Andrew James, Edwin T. Johnston, Andrew Lyons, William H. Leftwich, John H. McCance, Thomas W. McKeil, John W. Martin, Jordan H. Meredith, R. L. Mitchell, John (Irish patriot). Maury, Robert H. Montague, John H. Purcell, John Perkins, E. T. Paine, Robert A. Palmer, George S. Peachy, Dr. St. G. Quarles, Benj. M. Randolph, Joseph W. Richardson, R. P. Royster, George W. Spence, E. B. Starke, P. H. Starke, Marcellus T. Sutton, William M. Snead, William W.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.16 (search)
as follows: Daniel H. Christie, Colonel; Robert D. Johnston, former captain of Company K, Lieutenant right and left of the centre, then might General Johnston's anticipations have been fully realized cers wounded in the battle were, Lieutenant-Colonel R. D. Johnston, Captain William Johnston, Capta Cedar Creek, General Pegram sent an order to Johnston to cross the bridge and follow the road towards Strasburg. General Johnston sent a message to him that it would be impossible to cross the bridgd that the enemy would occupy them before he (Johnston) could cross; but that he could cross below, reached a point near Mount Jackson, General Johnston was ordered to face about and hold the enemy knall, of the 23rd, got his death wound, that Johnston's brigade won distinguished notice. General the open fields to the Berryville road and to Johnston's assistance. There was not a fence nor a trith cavalry, and hold Sheridan in check until Johnston had got back to the rest of the infantry and [11 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Malvern HillJuly 1, 1862. (search)
lied for aid in behalf of Porter, so fully occupied that they declared they could spare none. Of the devoted, loyal sons of Virginia who volunteered for her defense, none was more patriotic or heroic than John Bankhead Magruder. On the plains of Mexico he had won his first laurels. With consummate skill he fortified the historic peninsular from Yorktown to Mulberry Point, so that the foremost captain of the Federal army, with 100,000 men against 15,000, was halted and held at bay until Johnston's forces could march to the rescue. At Savage's station he attacked the rear guard of McClellan's army, and inflicted severe loss on the Federals. From that point he had moved with great alacrity to Timberlake's store, and was in position to deal a telling blow at Frazier's farm, when the order came to move to New Market. It does seem the irony of fate that he should have been the victim of the misfortunes that attended our imperfect knowledge of the roads and topography around Richmond.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Cumberland Grays, Company D, Twenty-first Virginia Infantry. (search)
ere (we could not realize it then), in retreat, as we supposed, moving to join Johnston's army, and we were ordered to prepare to take trains of supplies to them at Mger coach, to carry President Davis and party to Greensboroa, then held by General Johnston. The train was made ready, but one after another of the President's Cabes of the memorable journey from Danville to Washington, Ga., the meeting with Johnston at Greensboroa, pages could be written of this meeting. The journey from Greecrossing the river on a pontoon, en route for Danville, and to operate against Johnston's army. The superintendent ordered the trains withdrawn, and I was instructed rolling stock of the 4-feet 8 1/2-inch gauge, go to Greensboro, report to General Johnston, and follow the fortunes of that army. Peace negotiations. Peace negotiations were in progress between Johnston and Sherman. I was advised the evening previous that the surrender would be officially announced in the morning. Calling
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.29 (search)
ere (we could not realize it then), in retreat, as we supposed, moving to join Johnston's army, and we were ordered to prepare to take trains of supplies to them at Mger coach, to carry President Davis and party to Greensboroa, then held by General Johnston. The train was made ready, but one after another of the President's Cabes of the memorable journey from Danville to Washington, Ga., the meeting with Johnston at Greensboroa, pages could be written of this meeting. The journey from Greecrossing the river on a pontoon, en route for Danville, and to operate against Johnston's army. The superintendent ordered the trains withdrawn, and I was instructed rolling stock of the 4-feet 8 1/2-inch gauge, go to Greensboro, report to General Johnston, and follow the fortunes of that army. Peace negotiations. Peace negotiations were in progress between Johnston and Sherman. I was advised the evening previous that the surrender would be officially announced in the morning. Calling
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.37 (search)
Peculiar malady. He informed us, however, of a peculiar malady which troubled him, and complained that one arm and one leg were heavier than the other, and would occasionally raise his arm straight up, as he said, to let the blood run back into his body, and so relieve the excessive weight. I have heard that he often did this, when marching, and having become very religious, his men supposed he was praying. I never saw him any more, except at Manassas after the battle, when General Johnston and other officers were congratulating him upon his fine conduct in the battle. These peculiarities have often been regarded and cited as evidences of the great genius he possessed. I have always heard it said that he was an advocate for raising the black flag, and showing no mercy to the enemy who were invading our country and destroying our homes. And it has often been said and written, that he urged General Lee to assault the enemy in the town of Fredericksburg by night, after t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
e, Col. W. J., 258, 261. Holmes, Gen. J. H.,4, 215. Hopkins, George, 377. Howletts, Charge at, 12. Hunter, R. M. T., Sketch of, 193. Hyman, Col. J. H., 263. Iverson, Gen., Alfred, 165. Jackson, Gen. T. J., His Career and Character, 91; his corps, English estimate of, 92: fatal wounding of, 256; incidents in his life at West Point, 309; in a duel, 312; death of, 328. Jenkins, Gen. M, 7. Johnson, Gen. B. R., 13, 19, 90. Johnson, Gen. B. T., 173. Johnson, Gen., Edward, 170. Johnston, Gen. Joseph E., 154, 157, 161; his negotiations with Sherman, 272. Jones, Lt.-Col., killed, 9. Jordan, Col. R. D., 166. Jordan, Surgeon, killed, 165. Jordan, Capt., Wm., 17. Kemper, Col. Del., 7. Kernstown, Battle of. 314. Knight, Capt. J. S., killed, 166. Knox, Myra E., 323. Lamb, Hon., John, 208. Laughton, Jr., Capt. John E., 347. Lee Camp, No. 1., C. V., 91. Lee, Gen., Fitzhugh, 276. Lee, Gen. G. W. Custis, 38, 286. Lee, Gen. R. E, Surrender of, 300; Birthd