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The Daily Dispatch: April 8, 1862., [Electronic resource] 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Stoddard Johnston or search for Stoddard Johnston in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
is camp at Lacy Springs, nine miles south of that town, after midnight, and attacked Sigel early next morning. The advent of Breckinridge was probably unexpected by the Federal General. He accepted battle, however, and was entirely defeated and driven from the field, losing five or six pieces of artillery. He puts his force engaged at 5,500, though General Strother says in his report that Sigel's column numbered 8,500. Mr. Pond puts Breckinridge's numbers at from 4,600 to 5,000. Colonel Stoddard Johnston says that Breckinridge had 3,100 muskets in his infantry, and if so, his force was probably under 4,600, and not over it. The curtain drops, and the principal actors now change. General Lee, pressed by Grant's overwhelming numbers, as soon as he learns that Sigel is disposed of, orders Breckinridge to Hanover Junction, and leaves the defence of the Valley to W. E. Jones, with some 5,000 or 6,000 men scraped together from every part of it. The result proved that the withdrawal o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Shenandoah Valley in 1864, by George E. Pond—Campaigns of the civil war, XI. (search)
is camp at Lacy Springs, nine miles south of that town, after midnight, and attacked Sigel early next morning. The advent of Breckinridge was probably unexpected by the Federal General. He accepted battle, however, and was entirely defeated and driven from the field, losing five or six pieces of artillery. He puts his force engaged at 5,500, though General Strother says in his report that Sigel's column numbered 8,500. Mr. Pond puts Breckinridge's numbers at from 4,600 to 5,000. Colonel Stoddard Johnston says that Breckinridge had 3,100 muskets in his infantry, and if so, his force was probably under 4,600, and not over it. The curtain drops, and the principal actors now change. General Lee, pressed by Grant's overwhelming numbers, as soon as he learns that Sigel is disposed of, orders Breckinridge to Hanover Junction, and leaves the defence of the Valley to W. E. Jones, with some 5,000 or 6,000 men scraped together from every part of it. The result proved that the withdrawal o