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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 3 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 3 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
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General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 11 (search)
m the ground allotted to Polk's corps, across the road leading from Dallas toward Atlanta-his left division, Bate's, holding that road. As soon as his troops were in position, Lieutenant-General Hood, to develop the enemy, sent forward Colonel Bush Jones, with his regiment (the united Thirty-second and Fifty-eighth Alabama) and Austin's sharpshooters, in all about three hundred men. After advancing about a mile, this detachment encountered Hooker's (Twentieth) corps. Having the written order of his corps commander to hold his ground after meeting the enemy, Colonel Jones resisted resolutely the attack of the overwhelming Federal forces. But, after a gallant So gallant a one that the commander of Hooker's leading division thought he was engaged with a brigade, at least. (See General Geary's report.) fight, he was, of course, driven back to his division-Stewart's. An hour and a half before sunset, a brisk cannonade was opened upon Hood's centre division, Stewart's, opposite
oad leading to Chattanooga. Clayton's brigade, with a portion of Bate's, continued the pursuit for half a mile beyond this road, when, in consequence of threatening movements on the right and left, they fell back leisurely about sunset, re-forming on the east side of the road. In these charges the Fifteenth and Thirty-seventh Tennessee regiments, Colonel Tyler commanding, captured four pieces of artillery, and Clayton's brigade, aided by the Fifty-eighth Alabama, of Bate's brigade (Colonel Bush Jones commanding), captured three pieces. During the whole of these several engagements the enemy's fire was very heavy and destructive, and each brigade suffered severely, both in officers and men. Their conduct was most gratifying, and needs no praise from me. As the result of the afternoon's work, to which each brigade contributed its full share, I claim that we rescued the battery of Wright's brigade and the flag of one of his regiments; that twelve pieces of artillery were wrested f
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 2.12 (search)
he battery, I ordered it to continue the firing. Sending my staff to halt the division and Lieutenant Jones, Aid-de-Camp, especially to Brigadier-General Stovall to halt his brigade and put it in posColonel R. J. Henderson commanding) on the right, Gibson's in the centre, and Holtzclaw's (Colonel Bush Jones commanding) upon the left. Hearing considerable firing in the rear, I ordered Colonel JonColonel Jones to move Holtzclaw's brigade forward in line of battle, keeping his right resting on the pike, so as to render any assistance that might be necessary to General Stevenson. Having given some generad with my staff rode up the pike to communicate with General Stevenson. Upon coming up with Colonel Jones, I learned that the enemy in large force was forming upon his left as if for the purpose of ordial thanks for the part performed by him on this occasion, and also to Colonels Henderson and Jones, of whose brigade commanders I may say, without reflecting upon them, that their commands lost n
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 16: (search)
ope church, Polk and Hardee between that corps and the highway to Atlanta from Dallas, which Hardee's left was to cover. On the 25th the enemy approached through Dallas and along Pumpkin Vine creek, skirmishing with the Confederate advance guard, and spread out northeastward in a line parallel to that of Johnston. The two armies were now farther from the railroad than at any other period of the campaign. Hooker pushed across Pumpkin Vine creek toward New Hope church, and was met by Col. Bush Jones with his Alabama regiment and sharpshooters, of Stewart's division, in all 300 men, who for some time made a resolute resistance. But Hooker crowded them back, and an hour and a half before sunset the Federal cannon opened opposite Hood's center. Shortly after, in the midst of a terrific thunderstorm, the Federals, struggling on through the mud, struck the Confederate line. Two divisions assailed Stewart, in such deep order that their front only equaled that of the three brigades of
alties, 16 killed and 133 wounded at the battle of Chickamauga. (369) Color-bearer J. W. Tillinghast distinguished in the battle. (384) Mentioned in General Bate's report. (389) Thrilling account of action in battle of Chickamauga, given by Col. Bush Jones. (400-404) General Clayton mentions regiment and gives force on September 9th, 28 officers, 429 men, 401 guns; on September 20th, 22 officers, 338 men and 316 guns. (405) Mentioned in Maj. P. F. Hundley's report. (407,408) Colonel Woodruff'9) List of those who distinguished themselves in battle of Chickamauga: Sergt.-Maj. J. R. Larkin; Sergt. J. W. George, Company H; Private J. P. Seabrook, Company I; Private Calloway Johnson, Company E. (389, 400-403) Mentioned in reports of Col. Bush Jones and Gen. Henry D. Clayton. (404) Carried into battle, on the 19th, 461 guns, 29 officers; on the 20th, 314 guns, 17 officers; report of Colonel Ketchum, commanding brigade. (409– 411) Col. A. R. Lankford's report says: The noncom-mission
ng the retreat of General Gibson across the Harpeth river, and on the south side the brigade fought during the day as rear-guard under his command and that of Col. Bush Jones. Early in 1865 he and his brigade were sent to Mobile, and during the early part of the siege of Spanish Fort, Holtzclaw's and Ector's brigades relieved Thomas' Alabama reserves in the trenches. During the valorous defense of that post he commanded the left wing of the little army, Colonel Jones commanding his brigade, and was warmly commended for his services by General Gibson. Retreating to Meridian, after the fall of Mobile, he was paroled, with the army of Gen. Richard Taylor, in nominated Seymour and Blair, was a district presidential elector in 1876, and elector for the State at large in 1888. In February, 1893, he was appointed by Governor Jones a member of the State railroad commission to succeed Gen. Levi W. Lawler, deceased. His appointment gave universal satisfaction. His useful career as a citi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Chickamauga. (search)
e road leading to Chattanooga. Clayton's brigade, with a portion of Bate's, continued the pursuit for half a mile beyond this road, when, in consequence of threatening movements on the right and left, they fell back leisurely about sunset, reforming on the east side of the road. In these charges the Fifteenth and Thirty-seventh Tennessee regiments, Colonel Tyler commanding, captured four pieces of artillery, and Clayton's brigade, aided by the Fifty-eighth Alabama, of Bate's brigade (Colonel Bush Jones commanding), captured three pieces. During the whole of these several engagements the enemy's fire was very heavy and destructive, and each brigade suffered severely, both in officers and men. Their conduct was most gratifying and needs no praise from me. As the result of the afternoon's work, to which each brigade contributed its full share, I claim that we rescued the battery of Wright's brigade and the flag of one of his regiments; that twelve pieces of artillery were wrested f
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Addenda by the Editor. (search)
1st FloridaLieut.-col. E. Badger. 4th Florida 6th FloridaLieut.-col. A. D. McLean. 7th FloridaLieut.-col. T. Ingram. A. P. Stewart's division. M. A. Stovall's Brigade. 40th GeorgiaLieut.-col. R. M. Young. 41st Georgia. Col. W. E. Curtis. 42d GeorgiaMaj. W. H. Hulsey. 43d GeorgiaLieut.-col. H. C. Kellogg. 52d GeorgiaMaj. John J. Moore. H. D. Clayton's Brigade. 18th Alabama.Col. J. T. Holtzclaw. 36th AlabamaCol. L. T. Woodruff. 38th Alabama 32d AlabamaCol. Bush Jones. 58th Alabama O. F. Strahl's Brigade. 4th TennesseeLieut.-col. L. W. Finlay. 5th TennesseeCol. J. J. Lamb. 19th TennesseeCol. F. M. Walker. 24th TennesseeCol. John A. Wilson. 31st TennesseeLieut.-col. F. E. P. Stafford. 33d TennesseeLieut.-col. H. C. McNeill. John Adams' Brigade. 13th LouisianaMaj. F. L. Campbell. 20th Louisiana 16th LouisianaCol. D. Gober. 25th Louisiana 19th LouisianaMaj. H. A. Kennedy. Austin's Battalion (14th Louisiana Battalion Sh