hide Matching Documents

Your search returned 111 results in 27 document sections:

1 2 3
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The first fight of iron-clads. (search)
y wounded. The command then devolved upon Lieutenant Catesby Jones. It was now 5 o'clock, nearly two hourdreaming of other victories in the morning. Lieutenant Jones reported: It was not easy to keep a flag flyinck, and observing a division standing at ease, Lieutenant Jones inquired: Why are you not firing, Mr. Egg thumb at her every two minutes and a half. Lieutenant Jones now determined to run her down or board her. Fd be retired from the command of the Virginia. Lieutenant Jones should have been promoted, and should have suche explosion on the burning Congress. except Lieutenant Jones he was the best man. He had distinguished himsore, in a tone of deepest disgust, gave the order: Mr. Jones, fire a gun to windward, and take the ship back to boats, it took three hours to disembark. Lieutenant Catesby Jones and myself were the last to leave. Settinharp-shooters were at work on both banks. Lieutenant Catesby Jones, in his report, speaks of this service: Li
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 15.58 (search)
s, in ordinary; and the ship of the line Pennsylvania, 120 guns, receiving-ship ;--all lying at the yard or in the stream. The yard was walled around with a high brick inclosure, and protected by the Elizabeth River, and there were over 800 marines and sailors with officers. On the side of Virginia the situation was: that of General Taliaferro with his staff; Captain Heth and Major Tyler, two volunteer companies,--the Blues of Norfolk and the Grays of Portsmouth,--and Captains Pegram and Jones, of the navy. These were the only troops in Norfolk, until after the evacuation of the navy yard and the departure of the Federal ships. Captain H. G. Wright, of the Engineers, who was on the United States steamer Pawnee that had been sent to secure the ships and property at the Gosport Navy Yard, reached Norfolk after dark on April 20th. He reported thus: On reaching the yard it was found that all the ships afloat except the Cumberland had been scuttled, by order of Commodore McCauley,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 15.61 (search)
s placed on the hull was, at the same point, 41 feet 4 inches in breadth, so that the raft extended on either side 3 feet 8 inches beyond the hull. The raft was 5 feet deep and was immersed in the water 31 feet. The Merrimac's prow, according to Jones, was 2 feet below the surface of the water. The prow, therefore, if on, would have struck the armored hull 131 feet above its lowest part, and could not have damaged it. Further, the prow extended 2 feet forward from the stem, and had it been lo were still too far off to do her much damage, the Monitor came out to meet us. For some length of time we devoted our attention to her, but having no solid shot, and finding that our light shell were making but little impression upon her turret, Jones ordered the pilot to disregard the Monitor altogether, and carry out his first instructions by placing the Virginia as near to the Minnesota as possible. Instead, however, of taking us within a half mile of that ship, as we afterward learned he
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 12: fight between the Merrimac and Monitor, March 8, 1862. (search)
ce, on the 29th of March, 1862, Commodore Josiah Tatnall was ordered to command her instead of the cool and judicious Catesby Jones. who had conducted the engagement with the Monitor with so much skill and bravery. Commodore Tatnall had a high repmmodore Josiah Tatnall. well as one man can know another. Tatnall was ready for any desperate service, but he lacked Catesby Jones' coolness and judgment. Up to the time Tatnall took command the iron-clad had been in dock undergoing repairs, andthe ship and a mile beyond. Tatnall remained for some hours in the Roads until finally in disgust he gave an order to Lieut. Jones to fire a gun to windward and take the ship back to her buoy. The above Confederate account does not agree with th pilot-house, and the commanding officer of the Merrimac took advantage of this circumstance to return to Norfolk. Catesby Jones was too clever an officer not to know that if he should get aground in the narrow channel the Monitor would certainly
of the ship to that gallant, intelligent officer, Lieutenant Catesby Jones, with orders to fight her as long as the men couling occurred after I had placed the ship in charge of Lieutenant Jones, were reported to me by that officer. At an early lk. The following is an extract from the report of Lieutenant Jones, of the proceedings of the Virginia on the ninth: onduct. To that brave and intelligent officer, Lieutenant Catesby Jones, the executive and ordnance officer of the Virginntitles an officer to promotion, I see in the case of Lieutenant Jones one in all respects worthy of it. As flag-officer I aduties of flag-captain, and I should be proud to have Lieutenant Jones ordered to the Virginia as Lieutenant Commandant, if red the first gun, and when the command devolved upon Lieutenant Jones, in consequence of my disability, he was ordered to perform the duties of executive officer. Lieutenant Jones has expressed to me his satisfaction in having had the services of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Hampton roads--Confederate official reports. (search)
of the ship to that gallant, intelligent officer, Lieutenant Catesby Jones, with orders to fight her as long as the men couling occurred after I had placed the ship in charge of Lieutenant Jones were reported to me by that officer. At an early hlk. The following is an extract from the report of Lieutenant Jones of the proceedings of the Virginia on the 9th: Atonduct. To that brave and intelligent officer, Lieutenant Catesby Jones, the Executive and Ordnance Officer of the Virginntitles an officer to promotion, I see in the case of Lieutenant Jones one in all respects worthy of it. As Flag-Officer I aduties of flag captain, and I should be proud to have Lieutenant Jones ordered to the Virginia as Lieutenant-Commandant, if red the first gun, and when the command devolved upon Lieutenant Jones, in consequence of my disability, he was ordered to perform the duties of Executive Officer. Lieutenant Jones has expressed to me his satisfaction in having had the services of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Colonel Winston's Correction corrected. (search)
led in question. I stated the loss at 680, killed, wounded and missing; my critic, relying on the consolidated reports, says it was 301. Now, through the kindness of a friend, I have obtained from the Confederate archives at Washington a copy of the tabulated report of Major R. W. Hunter, Assistant Adjutant-General to Major-General Edward Johnson. This document gives the following table of casualties:  killed.wounded.missing.aggregate. Johnson's staff 112 Stonewall brigade3520887330 Jones' brigade5830261421 Steuart's brigade83409190682 Nichol's brigade4330936388 Total2191,2293751,823 It appears, then, that my estimate of loss (680) was less than the loss as stated officially by General Johnson's Assistant Adjutant-General, viz: 682. The losses in Daniel's brigade were heavier, but were incurred chiefly in the first day's battle, as may be seen from General Rodes' report (September number, 1876, Historical Society Papers, page 149, compared with ditto, page 172). Rode
at close quarters, but with no perceptible effect. The Monitor fired rapidly from her revolving turret, but not with such aim as to strike successively in the same place, and the armor of the Virginia therefore remained unbroken. Lieutenant-commanding Catesby Jones, to whom Buchanan had entrusted the ship when he was removed to the hospital, soon discovered that the Monitor was invulnerable to his shells. He had a few solid shot, which were intended only to be fired from the nine-inch guns a but the speed was so small that it merely pushed her out of her way. It was then decided to board her, and all hands were piped for that object. Then the Monitor slipped away on to shoal water where the Virginia could not approach her, and Commander Jones, after waiting a due time, and giving the usual signals of invitation to combat, without receiving any manifestation on the part of the Monitor of an intention to return to deep water, withdrew to the navy yard. In the two days of conflic
elieved the United States steamship Stars and Stripes, and was then blockading off St. Marks; this accounted for her non-appearance. The foundation of the report originated from an affair which transpired in the vicinity of Appalach.; and but for the timely interference of Him who rules supreme, it would have proved severely disastrous to the fleet. On the nineteenth of May, a force of two hundred rebels, consisting in part of the crew of the rebel ram Merrimac, that was, and lead by Catesby Jones, who was formerly an officer in the United States army, but now one of the rankest of secessionists, landed upon the extremity of Dog Island, within two miles of the United States steamship Adele. So expertly and silently was the movement executed, that not a person on the above mentioned vessel had even a suspecting thought of so near an approach of the enemy. Thus far, the marauders worked successfully, making no demonstrations whatever, until eleven o'clock at night; then embarking
Doc. 102. the Federal Generals at Charleston. Letter from General Jones. Hdqrs. Dept. Of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida, Charleston, June 13, 1864. General--Five generals and forty-five field officers of the United States Army--all of them prisoners of war — have been sent to this city for safe keeping. They have been turned over to Brigadier-General Ripley, commanding the first military district of this department, who will see that they are provided with commodious quarters in a part of the city occupied by non-combatants, the majority of whom are women and children. It is proper, however, that I should inform you that it is a part of the city which has for many months been exposed, day and night, to the fire of your guns. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, Samuel Jones, Major-General Commanding Major-General J. G. Foster, Commanding United States Forces on coast of South Carolina, Confederate States. General Foster's reply. headquarters Depa
1 2 3