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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 9 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 6 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Catesby Ap R. Jones or search for Catesby Ap R. Jones in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
the future historian. The official report of Admiral Buchanan (Vol. 7, page 305, Southern Historical Society Papers), and the admirable narrative of Captain Catesby Ap. R. Jones (which we printed in the Southern Magazine and shall reprint hereafter), settle the question beyond peradventure, and we cannot conceive that partizan rom subsequent movements. I am, Sir, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, Braxton Bragg, General. Services of the Virginia (Merrimac). by Capt. Catesby Ap R. Jones. [The following deeply interesting narrative of the gallant and accomplished executive officer of the Virginia was prepared for our Society not long bifle-ball, and had to be carried below. His bold daring and intrepid conduct won the admiration of all on board. The Executive and Ordnance officer, Lieutenant Catesby Ap R. Jones, succeeded to the command. The action continued until dusk, when we were forced to seek an anchorage. The Congress was riddled and on fire. A tra
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Merrimac and Monitor. (search)
Monitor. The claim now before the United States Senate, for prize money by the crew of the Monitor on the ground that she disabled the Merrimac, and thus saved Washington and even New York from destruction, has revived interest in the famous Battle of Hampton Roads, and elicited a number of papers worth preserving for the use of the future historian. The official report of Admiral Buchanan (Vol. 7, page 305, Southern Historical Society Papers), and the admirable narrative of Captain Catesby Ap. R. Jones (which we printed in the Southern Magazine and shall reprint hereafter), settle the question beyond peradventure, and we cannot conceive that partizan influence can prevail on Congress to grant this absurd claim of the crew of the Monitor. General D. H. Maury has given a summary of the facts in the following letter addressed to Senator Johnston: Letter from General Maury. office of the Southern Historical Society, November, 1882. Senator John W. Johnston, of Virginia . D
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Services of the Virginia (Merrimac). (search)
Services of the Virginia (Merrimac). by Capt. Catesby Ap R. Jones. [The following deeply interesting narrative of the gallant and accomplished executive officer of the Virginia was prepared for our Society not long before his lamented death. It will be found to dispose of most conclusively the claim of the Monitor for prize money.] When on April 21st, 1861, the Virginians took possession of the abandoned navy-yard at Norfolk, they found that the Merrimac had been burnt and sunk. She wch had become annoying. About this time the Flag Officer was badly wounded by a rifle-ball, and had to be carried below. His bold daring and intrepid conduct won the admiration of all on board. The Executive and Ordnance officer, Lieutenant Catesby Ap R. Jones, succeeded to the command. The action continued until dusk, when we were forced to seek an anchorage. The Congress was riddled and on fire. A transport steamer was blown up. A schooner was sunk and another captured. We had to le