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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 260 36 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 124 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 75 3 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 71 1 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 70 10 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 66 6 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 39 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 38 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 34 0 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 30 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for D. R. Jones or search for D. R. Jones in all documents.

Your search returned 19 results in 5 document sections:

Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
x companies of cavalry attached to his command. Seven other cavalry companies were distributed among the other brigades. Bonham's position was behind Mitchell's ford, with his four regiments of Carolinians; Jenkins' Fifth regiment was with General Jones' brigade, behind McLean's ford, and Sloan's Fourth regiment was with Evans' brigade on the left, at the stone bridge. With this disposition of his little army, General Beauregard awaited the development of the enemy's movement against him. lina troops with General Beauregard's command were put into two brigades, Bonham's, the First, and D. R. Jones', the Third. The Second, Third, Seventh and Eighth regiments made up General Bonham's brigade; the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth and Ninth, General Jones' brigade. Gregg's First regiment was at Norfolk, and Hampton's legion was not brigaded. Headquarters were established at Fairfax Court House, and the Confederate line ran from Springfield on the Orange & Alexandria railroad to Little Falls
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
y, at 7,713 effectives, stationed as follows: Orr's First rifles, on Sullivan's island, 1,521; Hagood's First, Cole's island and stone forts, 1,115; Dunovant's Twelfth, north and south Edisto, 367; Manigault's Tenth, Georgetown and defenses, 538; Jones' Fourteenth, camp near Aiken, 739; Heyward's Eleventh, Beaufort and defenses, 758; cavalry, camp near Columbia, 173; cavalry, camp near Aiken, 62; arsenal, Charleston (artillery), 68; Edwards' Thirteenth, De Saussure's Fifteenth, and remainder ofarleston Light Dragoons and the Rutledge Riflemen, were stationed in front of Grahamville, to watch the landings from the Broad. Colonel Edwards' regiment and Moore's light battery were at Coosawhatchie, Colonel Dunovant's at Pocotaligo, and Colonel Jones', with Tripp's company of cavalry, in front of the important landing at Port Royal ferry. Colonel Martin, with part of his regiment of cavalry, was in observation at the landings on Combahee, Ashepoo and Edisto rivers. The idea of this dispo
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
es, and only two regiments of the latter at that. The brunt fell on the gallant command of Kershaw and his splendid battery. Hart's battery, which operated with Jones' division on Kershaw's left, lost 5 men wounded, 2 mortally. Hart engaged the enemy from D. R. Jones' right, compelling the retreat out of view of the enemy's infantry. Jones put his division in admirable position on Kershaw's left for attack, but he reports: Scarcely had this disposition been made when I received orders from General Magruder to fall back to the railroad bridge with my whole command to support the right of his line. This unfortunate order was inspired by Magruder's overrating the movement which turned Kershaw's right, and which Semmes checked, at little cost. But for Jones' withdrawal at the moment he was about to attack, Savage Station might have been a harder blow to General Mc-Clellan. McLaws compliments his brigade commanders in high terms. Of Kershaw he says: I beg leave to call attention
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 8: (search)
Walker, and the rallied fragments of Jackson's, Hood's, Hill's and Jones' troops. In this great achievement Kershaw's South Carolina brigdivision. Jenkins' brigade under Colonel Walker was on the left of Jones' division, and the operations are reported by Colonel Walker. Durige on the infantry masses as they came up from the Antietam against Jones. The losses of the brigade at Sharpsburg were 26 killed and 184 woburg, the Fifteenth lost 110 killed and wounded. The attack upon Jones on the right, coming from a whole corps, and met by his division alon had been turned by a passage below him. Just at the moment when Jones was driven back upon the town and the corps of General Burnside undivision of A. P. Hill, which had been marching all day, reported on Jones' right and formed forward into battle. This arrival saved the day. if Lee's line to Shepherdstown was to be saved, and A. P. Hill and Jones ordered the charge. My troops were not in a moment too soon, says
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
assistant adjutant-general with the rank of captain, and regularly assigned to the staff of General Jones. When the latter was given division command after the battle of Malvern Hill, Captain Cowardvanced to the rank of major in the same line of duty. After the battle of Sharpsburg, when General Jones was compelled by failure of health to return to his home, Major Coward accepted the positionthe army of Northern Virginia. Early in 1862 he was assigned to duty as ordnance officer of General Jones' division, with the rank of captain of light artillery. He continued on duty in this capacity with that division until the death of General Jones in December, 1862, and then served in the same capacity with R. H. Anderson's and William Mahone's divisions, except a period, June to October, p was knocked off by a minie ball, and at Sharpsburg having his horse killed under him. Upon General Jones' retirement he was ordered to the staff of Lieutenant-General Longstreet as judge-advocate o