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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 10 0 Browse Search
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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 3: (search)
ation I had with him eighteen years ago, which surprised me very much, as I never saw him but once. December 25.—A rainy, windy, and stormy Christmas, but the first really disagreeable day we have had since we crossed the Alps, above three months ago. . . . . We went comfortably enough to St. Peter's, and having good places there by the kindness of Mr. Kestner, saw the grand mass performed by the Pope, to great advantage . . . . December 26.—. . . . I dined in a gentlemen's party, at Mr. Jones the Bankers, with Mr. Harper, Charles Carroll Harper, of Baltimore. Dr. Bowring, Sir John Bowring. and a Mr. Greg, William R. Greg, author of Enigmas of Life, etc. whom I found a very intelligent Englishman of fortune, who means, as Dr. Bowring says, to stand for the next Parliament, for Lancaster. There were two or three other persons present, but the conversation was in the hands of those I have mentioned, and was very spirited. It turned on English reform and American slavery
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 8: (search)
treaties of Henry VIII., and I know not what else; besides another large room full of a wild confusion of old parchments. The very architecture of these repositories, with its unhewn or unsmoothed timbers, —dating from 1250,—was in keeping, and added to the curious venerableness of the whole arrangement. When we had seen all this we went to the Cloisters, where Milman, amidst the remains of the monastery of the elder religion, has a most tasteful and quiet mansion, arranged . . . . by Inigo Jones. He came immediately out and went over the Abbey with us. We admired, of course, the magnificent choir, one of the finest specimens of rich Gothic in the world; the elaborate chapel of Henry VII., . . . . and the other architectural wonders and beauties of this rare and solemn pile. But, after all, the parts that have historical names attached to them are most attractive . . . . . In the Poets' Corner it was not without a very thrilling feeling, that, on reading the inscription to Golds
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 19: (search)
flush with indignation at it, and break forth into unseemly expressions of anger. In the little church, which is very becoming the family's position,—not large, but picturesque and antique,—there is a beautiful group of a mother and child,—the mother only twenty-three,—by Chantrey, which he claimed—and I dare say rightly — to be the best of his works. It is certainly worthy to be such, by its purity and grace. Afterwards I went over the house, as you did last year. It was built by Inigo Jones, and may have been good as he left it, but it has been so altered and enlarged, that, except the fine staircase, and the entrance-hall all covered with arms brought home as trophies from the war of the Spanish Succession, there is nothing—or very little—to admire in it, except two or three good rooms. The library is large, and I occupied myself there for an hour or more among the old Spanish books, some of which are curious. After lunch . . . . I took a long drive about the c
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
Jersey, Countess of, I. 138, 269, 296, 410, 11.466. Jewett, C. C., II. 304 note, 308, 810, 314. Johnson, Samuel, I. 53, 55; The Club II. 476, 478; life of, 492. Johnstone, Judge, I. 381. Joinville, Prince and Princess, H. 882. Jones, Commodore, I. 373. Jones, Mr., II. 65. Jordan, Baron von, I. 461, 478. Jomard, E. F., II. 117, 125, 133, 14L Jouberton, Anna, 1.183, H. 88. Jouffroy, II. 133. Jourdain, Camille, 1.255. Jouy, V. E. de, II. 108, 141. Julius. Dr., II. 260Jones, Mr., II. 65. Jordan, Baron von, I. 461, 478. Jomard, E. F., II. 117, 125, 133, 14L Jouberton, Anna, 1.183, H. 88. Jouffroy, II. 133. Jourdain, Camille, 1.255. Jouy, V. E. de, II. 108, 141. Julius. Dr., II. 260; letter to, 250. Jusuf, II. 133, 134, 137. K Kahlden, Baroness, I. 489. Kaltenbaeck, II. 2, 8. Kane, Mr., I 376. Kastner, Professor, I. 76, 77. Kean, Edmund, I. 67, 127. Keating, Dr., Oliver, 1.10. Keiblinger, librarian of Molk, II. 23. Kemble, Stephen, I. 291, 292. Kempt, Sir, James, II. 176. Kenney, Mr., I. 406. Kent, Duchess of, I. 435, 437. Kent, James, Chancellor, I. 338-340, II. 200, 226. Kenyon, Edward, II. 1. Kenyon, John, I. 411 and note, 418, II. 14