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was disabled, by having the rear transom of its carriage shot away. Both guns were again ready for action in a few hours. The garrison flag received a shot through the Union. The regimental flag was much torn by fragments of shell. The garrison, consisting of seven companies, First South Carolina artillery, was disposed of as follows, viz: First--Captain D. G. Fleming, with Company B, seventy-eight men, in command of east parapet battery, assisted by Lieutenants F. D. Bake and Iredell Jones; Lieutenant J. M. Rhett, Company A, although on sick report, was assigned temporarily to Company B. Second--Captain F. H. Harleston, with Company D, seventy-four men, in command of north-east parapet battery, assisted by Lieutenants McMillan, King and W. S. Simkins. Third--Captain J. C. King, with Company F, in command of north-west parapet battery, assisted by Lieutenants A. S. Gilliard, John Middleton, and W. H. Johnson. Fourth--Captain J. C. Mitchell, with Company I, seventy-
biad was disabled by having the rear transom of its carriage shot away. Both guns were again ready for action in a few hours. The garrison flag received a shot through the union. The regimental flag was much torn by fragments of shell. The garrison, consisting of seven companies 1st South Carolina Artillery, was disposed of as follows, viz.: 1st. Captain D. G. Fleming, with Company B, seventy-eight men, in command of east parapet battery, assisted by Lieutenants F. D. Bake and Iredell Jones. Lieutenant J. M. Rhett, Company A, although on sick report, was assigned temporarily to Company B. 2d. Captain F. H. Harleston, with Company D, seventy-four men, in command of northeast parapet battery, assisted by Lieutenants McMillan, King, and W. S. Simkins. 3d. Captain J. C. King, with Company F, in command of northwest parapet battery, assisted by Lieutenants A. S. Gilliard, John Middleton, and W. H. Johnson. 4th. Captain J. C. Mitchell, with Company I, seventy-eight men,
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865, Chapter 5: the greater assault on Wagner. (search)
f their assailants. Official reports show, and the same Confederate officer has stated as his impression, that the greater part of our loss was sustained at the beginning of the assault, and in front of the curtain, although we suffered some additional loss from the troops who gained the bastion, which loss must necessarily have been inflicted by the Fifty-fourth, as it was the leading regiment, and attacked the curtain. Further Confederate testimony is furnished in a letter of Lieut. Iredell Jones, who writes,— I visited the battery [Fort Wagner] yesterday. The dead and wounded were piled up in a ditch together sometimes fifty in a heap, and they were strewn all over the plain for a distance of three fourths of a mile. They had two [only one, the Fifty-fourth?] negro regiments, and they were slaughtered in every direction. One pile of negroes numbered thirty. Numbers of both white and black were killed on top of our breastworks as well as inside. The negroes fought gal
08, 209, 211, 212, 213, 214, 215. Johnson, Andrew, 313. Johnson, Edward, 196. Johnson, Fort, 114, 133, 141, 203, 206, 207, 283, 315. Johnson, J. C., 293. Johnson, James, P., 302, 304. Johnson, Private, 304. Johnson, Robert, Jr., 12, 13. Johnson, Samuel, 16. Johnson, W. H., 321. Johnson's Swamp, S. C., 291. Johnston, Alexander, 34, 105, 145. Johnston, Joseph E., 307. Jones, Charles C., Jr., 252. Jones, Edward L., 34, 62, 90, 92, 145, 150, 183, 188, 202, 204, 205, 233. Jones, Iredell, 95. Jones, Samuel, 100, 185,195,208, 212, 257. Jones, Samuel, letter to Braxton Bragg, 195. Jones, sutler, 177. Joy, Charles F., 276, 291, 316, 317. Joy Street Church, 12. Junction with Western Army, 266. K. K Company, 20, 38, 54, 55, 73, 75, 91, 118, 140, 145, 148, 150, 155, 164, 168, 184, 188, 198, 202, 204, 206, 215, 221, 222, 223, 231, 232, 234, 237, 245, 246, 263, 286, 291, 297, 304, 309, 310, 311, 312, 315, 316, 317. Kansas Troops. Infantry: First (Colored), 2.
icating the character of the colored troops. On this subject there can hardly be said to have been a dissenting voice. When the writer asked General Strong afterwards, on board the steamer which was to carry him North, how the 54th behaved, he said emphatically, No new regiment, which had lost its colonel, could have behaved better. For a similar remark made by him to Mr. E. L. Pierce, see Emilio's 54th Mass., p. 94. But the final test is that of Confederate officers themselves. Lieut. Iredell Jones, visiting the battery afterwards, wrote, One file of negroes numbered thirty. Numbers of both white and black were killed on top of our breastworks as well as inside. The negroes fought gallantly and were headed by as brave a colonel as ever lived. He mounted the breastworks waving his sword and at the head of his regiment, and he and a negro orderly sergeant fell dead over the inner crest of the works. Emilio's 54th Mass., p. 95. A good deal of just indignation was created
Jollimore, William, 380 Jones, Alonzo M., 463 Jones, Augustus M., 492 Jones, C. B., 463 Jones, C. C., Jr., 89 Jones, C. E., 380 Jones, C. G., 527 Jones, C. H., 380 Jones, C. K., 527 Jones, Charles, 380 Jones, E. F., 11th Mass. Inf., 380 Jones, E. F., 26th Mass. Inf., 13, 14, 18, 20, 27, 56, 206, 207, 244. Jones, E. J., 115, 150, 190 Jones, E. P., 380 Jones, Edward, 463 Jones, F. A., 380 Jones, F. N. P., 527 Jones, Gardner, 463 Jones, George, 527 Jones, Henry, 380 Jones, Iredell, 87 Jones, Irwin, 527 Jones, J. E., 44 Jones, J. R., 49 Jones, J. S., 527 Jones, J. W., 10th Mass. Inf., 380 Jones, J W., 23d Mass. Inf., 437 Jones, John, 527 Jones, Leonard, 463 Jones, Oswego, 105, 380 Jones, Peter, 527 Jones, R. A., 464 Jones, S. P., 527 Jones, S. W., 464 Jones, Thomas, 527 Jones, W H., 464 Jones, William, 24th Mass. Inf., 380 Jones, William, 55th Mass. Inf., 380 Jordan, C. C., 380 Jordan, C. E., 380 Jordan, C. M., 150 Jordan, E. D., 464 Jorda
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
and was at Danville when General Lee surrendered. Going to Greensboro, to meet his brother, Iredell Jones, a first lieutenant of the regular army, he failed to find him, and joined the cavalry brigaprominent cotton manufacturing companies, and president of the Palmetto cotton mills. Captain Iredell Jones, a distinguished South Carolina soldier of the Confederacy, now residing near Rock Hill,n's island, a second company of students was formed, with Prof. C. S. Venable as captain and Iredell Jones as first lieutenant, but it was not accepted by Governor Pickens on account of the youth of k would be made on Fort Gregg that night; and the signals being read by officers at Sumter, Lieutenant Jones was ordered to carry the information in daylight to Colonel Keitt at Wagner. Thereupon he egg he commanded a detachment of forty men. After the evacuation of the Charleston defenses Lieutenant Jones was promoted to assistant inspector-general for the First military district of South Caroli
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Letters from Fort Sumter in 1862 and 1863. (search)
Letters from Fort Sumter in 1862 and 1863. By Lieutenant Iredell Jones, First Regiment South Carolina Regulars. [We have on hand a number of letters written by Lieutenant Jones, while serving in Fort Sumter, to his parents. As vivid descriptions, written at the time, of the events they describe by a gallant participant in thLieutenant Jones, while serving in Fort Sumter, to his parents. As vivid descriptions, written at the time, of the events they describe by a gallant participant in the heroic defence of Sumter, they are of interest and historic value worthy of a place in our records.] Letter no. 1. Fort Sumter, June 18th, 1862. You have heard by the papers the particulars of the bloody fight of the 16th, at Secessionville. Though on a small scale, this war furnishes not one instance of a more galshells bursted mostly in rear of us, and only once directly overhead, which wounded two men. There were five of us along together, composing our party. It was very unwise of us to have exposed ourselves thus recklessly, and the more so that we should have done so merely out of curiosity. Your affectionate son, Iredell Jones.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 3 (search)
Fifth Virginia, Colonel J. H. S. Funk. Twenty-seventh Virginia, Lieutenant-Colonel Charles [L.] Haynes. Thirty-third Virginia, Colonel F. W. M. Holliday. Steuart's brigade. the Virginia regiments constituted Terry's brigade, Gordon's division. Tenth Virginia, Colonel E. T. H. Warren. Twenty-third Virginia, Colonel A. G. Taliaferro. Thirty-seventh Virginia, Colonel T. V. Williams. First North Carolina, Colonel H. A. Brown. Third North Carolina, Colonel S. D. Thruston. Jones's brigade. the Virginia regiments constituted Terry's brigade, Gordon's division. Twenty-first Virginia, Colonel W. A. Witcher. Twenty-fifth Virginia, Colonel J. C. Higginbotham. Forty-second Virginia, Colonel R. W. Withers. Forty-fourth Virginia, Colonel Norvell Cobb. Forty-eighth Virginia, Colonel R. A Dungan. Fiftieth Virginia, Colonel A. S. Vanderventer. Stafford's brigade. constituting York's brigade. First Louisiana, Colonel W. R. Shivers. Second Louisiana, Colon
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Letters from Fort Sumter in 1862 and 1863. (search)
Letters from Fort Sumter in 1862 and 1863. By Lieut. Iredell Jones, First Regiment S. C. Regulars. No. 2. Fort Sumter, July 20, 1863. My Dear Father, —Since my last to mother much of interest has transpired, and all before my eyes. I have seen a desperate battle fought, preceded, as it was, by one of the most furious bombardments of the war. About 9 o'clock on Saturday morning, the five monitors, the Ironsides, and five gunboats moved up in front of Wagner and immediately opened believe the Battery will fall, for it is now almost encircled with gunboats and batteries. The garrison holds out bravely, and if assisted, as it deserves to be, Wagner cannot be taken. It is now 3 O'clock P. M. The bombardment was recommenced to-day, and still continues. The enemy's batteries have just opened on Sumter, and for the first time. Several shells have fallen inside the fort. A drummer-boy was wounded by a fragment a few moments ago. Your affectionate son, Iredell Jones
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