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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 20, 1862., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 14, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 31, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing forces at Port Royal, November 7th, 1861. (search)
Leasure. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Horatio G. Wright: 6th Conn., Col. John L. Chatfield; 7th Conn., Col. Alfred H. Terry; 9th Me., Col. Rishworth Rich; 4th N. H., Col. Thomas J. Whipple. Unattached . 3d R. I., Col. Nathaniel W. Brown; 1st N. Y. Engineers, Col. Edward W. Serrell; Battery E, 3d U. S. Art'y, Capt. John Hamilton. Confederate land forces, Brig.-Gen. Thomas F. Drayton: 4th Ga. Battalion, Lieut.-Col. W. H. Stiles; 9th S. C. (3 co's), Col. William C. Heyward; 12th S. C., Col. R. G. M. Dunovant; 15th S. C., Col. W. D. De Saussure; Beaufort (S. C.) Guerrillas, Capt. J. H. Screven; Ga. Battery, Capt. Jacob Read; 1st S. C. Militia Art'y (2 co's), Col. John A. Wagener. Loss: k, 11; w, 48; m, 7 = 66. Confederate naval forces, Flag-Officer Josiah Tattnall: Savannah (flag-ship), Lieut. John N. Maffitt; Sampson, Lieut. J. S. Kennard; Resolute, Lieut. J. Pembroke Jones. They were small side-wheel steamers, and each carried 2 32-pounders (smooth-bore). There were no casualties.
were, Col. Anderson and Capt.----, of the army, selected by Gen. Huger, who was too unwell to attend himself; and of the navy, myself, Corn. Hollins, and Capts. Sterrett and Lee, Commander Richard L. Jones, and Lieuts. Ap Catesby Jones and J. Pembroke Jones. The opinion was unanimous that the Virginia was then employed to the best advantage, and that she should continue, for the present, to protect Norfolk, and thus afford time to remove the public property. On the next day, at ten o'clock A. M., we observed from the Virginia that the flag was not flying on the Sewell's Point battery, and that it appeared to have been abandoned: I despatched Lieut. J. P. Jones, the Flag-Lieutenant, to Craney Island, where the confederate flag was still flying, and he there learned that a large force of the enemy had landed on Bay Shore, and were marching rapidly on Norfolk; that Sewell's Point battery was abandoned, and our troops were retreating. I then despatched the same officer to Norfolk,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Electrical torpedoes as a system of defence. (search)
neral employment if practicable. I was selected as his immediate assistant. His work commenced in the spring of 1862, and continued for a few months only with electrical torpedoes. He had arrived at no definite conclusion from his experiments, in any particular when he left the Confederacy for Europe, and I was ordered to take charge, subject to orders from the Navy Department only, and remained so until near the closing scenes of the war, when I was relieved in command by Captain J. Pembroke Jones. The means used in my electrical torpedo defences differed in every essential particular from those used by Captain Maury in his experiments. The peculiar construction of the mines, the methods of fixing them in position and connecting them with the cables and batteries; the determination of the quantities of powder to use at different depths and the effective areas, the batteries used for firing, and also for testing the mines, as well as the organization and equipment of the
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
I have the honor to inform you that I am directed by Captain Elzey, commanding this post, to say, in reply to the demands of the governor of Georgia, made through you yesterday, requesting him to withdraw his command beyond the limits of the State, he begs to request an interview with his excellency the governor, for the purpose of negotiating honorable terms of surrender at as early an hour this morning as practicable. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, J. P. Jones, Lieutenant Second Artillery, Post Adjutant. About 10 o'clock of the same morning the governor, accompanied by his staff and Brigadier-General Harris, commanding the troops, rode up to my quarters, and were received by me, when the following honorable terms were agreed upon and executed: His excellency the governor of Georgia, having demanded the United States arsenal at Augusta, commanded by Capt. Arnold Elzey, Second artillery, United States army, the following terms are agreed
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
el Dow's regiment of Mississippians was armed out of the guns expected by Georgia. When Captain Bulloch was ready to sail out, about ten days after making port, the arrival of the Federals at Tybee made that purpose a dangerous one, but in obedience to the order of the secretary of the navy he loaded the ship with cotton and resin, and on December 20th dropped down to Wilmington island, accompanied by Tattnall's squadron, the Savannah (flagship), Lieut. J. N. Maffitt; the Resolute, Lieut. J. P. Jones; the Sampson, Lieut. J. Kennard, and the Ida and Bartow. The Chatham artillery was also sent to Skidaway island to assist in case there should be a conflict. On the 23d the Fingal and Tattnall's boats ran down near the enemy's gunboats, but found them in such strong force that they were compelled to return. In the brief action which accompanied this reconnaissance, Tattnall's flagship was hit in the wheel-house and required assistance from the Resolute in returning. The Fingal foun
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: (search)
his going on with the command. Morgan and his men pushed on to Georgetown, and on the 17th captured Cynthiana, with 420 prisoners. The Georgia troopers, under command of Lieut.-Col. F. M. Nix, acted a prominent part in this brilliant affair; Captain Jones, of Company A, and Maj. Samuel J. Winn being especially distinguished among the officers. At the same time the First and Second Georgia cavalry regiments were earning their spurs with Forrest in Tennessee. Part of the First, under Col. J.he Georgia was of a different construction, 250 feet long and 60 feet in beam, with a casemate 12 feet high. Her machinery was defective, and it was necessary to tow her where needed. She carried seven guns and was under the command of Lieut. J. Pembroke Jones. The Atlanta, under command of Lieut. Charles H. McBlair, made a trial trip toward Fort Pulaski on July 31st and created much consternation in the Federal fleet. A Northern newspaper correspondent wrote that unless some monitor shoul
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
rty. Commodore Tatnall upon this joined his ship, at anchor near Sewell's Point. On May 10th, about 10 A. M., it was observed that no Confederate flag was flying at Sewell's Point battery and that the fort seemed to be abandoned. Flag-Lieutenant J. Pembroke Jones was immediately sent to Craney Island, and there learned for the first time that a large force of the enemy had landed at Bay Shore and were rapidly marching on Norfolk, and that our troops were retreating. Lieutenant Jones was theLieutenant Jones was then sent to Norfolk to confer with General Huger, in command at that place, and with Captain Sidney S. Lee at the navy-yard. At the navy-yard he found everything in flames, and that all the officers had left on the railroad. At Norfolk he was informed that General Huger and all his officers had left and that the enemy were within half a mile of the city in treaty with the mayor for its surrender. About 7 P. M. he reached the Merrimac with his report, and at this hour all the batteries on the r
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Muster Roll of the Holcombe Guards. (search)
tered into service June 3, 1861, with the following officers and men: J. J. Winn, Captain, dead; J. W. Rodes, first lieutenant, dead; B. G. Brown, second lieutenant, dead; W. B. Maupin, third lieutenant; T. J. Golding, orderly sergeant; J. E. Wyant, second sergeant, dead; D. O. Etherton, third sergeant, dead; W. A. Brown, fourth sergeant, killed at Williamsburg; C. B. Brown, fifth sergeant; W. P. Walters, first corporal, killed at Williamsburg; B. Fretwell, second corporal, died 1861; J. P. Jones, third corporal, dead; W. N. Parrott, fourth corporal; J. B. Ambroselli, killed at Gettysburg; F. A. Bowen, killed at Williamsburg; H. C. Blackwell, J. T. Belew, J. T. Bailey, W. H. H. Brown, B. G. Brown, W. G. Brown, R. C. Brown, G. P. Clarke, dead; W. N. Clarke, M. J. Clements, killed at Gettysburg; M. E. Clements, John L. Coleman, David Dove, dead; Peter L. Davis, Henry T. Davis, T. J. Fulcher, dead; G. R. Fisher, drowned; Eppa Fielding, W. B. Fielding, B. F. Fielding, killed at Bull R
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.52 (search)
of the Commodore Barney, a gunboat, and the loss of many lives in August, 1863, and the complete destruction of the Commodore Jones, a large gunboat, and nearly all her crew in May, 1864. These were the first vessels ever injured in war by any s In a long letter from the Secretary of the Navy, Mr. Mallory, to me after the war, he says: The destruction of the Commodore Jones, the leading vessel of Admiral Lee's fleet, which was ascending the James river to co-operate with General Butler inwell-known officers living who can testify to the exactness of all I have here written, viz: Captains W. H. Parker, J. Pembroke Jones, John M. Brooke, and J. Taylor Wood. I have therefore to request that as an act of simple justice you will answeurred in 1864, as clearly shown in my letter and in Mr. Mallory's words, which I here repeat: The destruction of the Commodore Jones, the leading vessel of Admiral Lee's fleet, which was ascending James river to co-operate with General Butler in the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stuart's cavalry in the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
brilliant. Capt. Bulloch again wanted Capt. Murdaugh detailed to command one of three vessels to make an attack on the New England ports. In a letter to the Secretary of the Navy from London, January 10, 1865, Capt. Bulloch says: I have long thought that a severe blow might be struck at New Bedford, Salem, Portland and other New England towns by sending from this side ships prepared with incendiary shells and Hall's rockets. If you will send out Commodore Davidson and Lieut. J. Pembroke Jones and will detail Lieut. Murdaugh, who is now in Europe, these three officers to command the ships, and each having not more than two subordinates of prudence and experience, I think the expedition could be secretly managed in the spring or early summer. This scheme was never consummated, coming as it did so soon before the termination of the war. What I have here recorded does not do justice to the naval career of Capt. Murdaugh. That the services he performed do not appear t
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