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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 131 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 72 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 50 22 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 48 8 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 46 14 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 37 15 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 32 8 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 0 Browse Search
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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Morale of General Lee's army. (search)
The Morale of General Lee's army. Rev. J. William Jones, D. D. In his testimony before the Committee on the conduct of the War, Major General Joseph Hooker says: Our artillery had always been superior to that of the rebels, as was also our infantry, except in discipline; and that, for reasons not necessary to mention, never did equal Lee's army. With a rank and file vastly inferior to our own, intellectually and physically, that army had, by discipline alone, acquired a character for steadiness and efficiency unsurpassed, in my judgment, in ancient or modern times. We have not been able to rival it, nor has there been any near approximation to it in the other rebel armies. [Italics mine.] I do not propose to enter upon any odious comparison between the Army of the Potomac and the Army of Northern Virginia, as to the character of the men who composed them; yet, I think I shall be able to show that General Hooker is entirely mistaken in attributing the confessed superiority of t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Confederate loss at seven Pines.-letter from General J. E. Johnston. (search)
The Confederate loss at seven Pines.-letter from General J. E. Johnston. [We take pleasure in publishing — the following letter from General Johnston, which explains itself, as we are always ready to make explanations or corrections of any thing that we may put into our Papers.] Richmond, June 22d, 1877. Rev. J. Wm. Jones, D. D., Secretary Southern Historical Society: Dear Sir: Major-General Longstreet's report of the battle of Seven Pines, as published in your Society's Papers-May and June, 1877-differs materially from his official report made to me, the commander of the Confederate army on that occasion. The difference is in the interpolation of a list of killed, wounded, and missing in the paper you published. No such list was in the official report. General Longstreet's statement of his loss is in the sentence of his report next to the last, viz: A rough estimate of the loss on this part of the field may be put down at 3,000 killed and wounded. This estimate was af
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A slander Refuted. (search)
uly exchanged, and are hereby so declared. Ro. Ould, Aqent of Exchangce. Richmond, September 12, 1863. By order: S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector-General. And if Mr. Blaine will not receive rebel authority, then the following is submitted: On page 74 of General Boynton's book (Sherman's Historical raid) the following telegram from Gen. Halleck, at Washington, to Burnside, in East Tennessee, is given: September 18,--. A part at least of Longstreet's corps is going to Atlanta. It is believed that Bragg, Johnston, and Hardee, with the exchanged prisoners from Vicksburg and Port Hudson, are concentrating against Rosecrans. You must give him all the aid you can. [Italics ours.] Either Mr. Blaine is mistaken, therefore, in giving General Grant as his authority for saying that these high-toned gentlemen and gallant soldiers violated their paroles, or else General Grant's memory is at variance with the facts. J. William Jones, Secretary Southern Historical Society.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
e other day, which those in charge of them had intended to send to our Archives, is but another sad illustration of the danger of allowing valuable material to remain in private hands. A distinguished Confederate officer wrote us last year that a fire had just. destroyed invaluable reports, &c., which he had intended to send us, and we fear that other such examples will be needed to convince our friends that the right thing to do with such material is to send it at once by express to J. Wm. Jones, Secretary Southern Historical Society, Richmond, Virginia. Remember, that where our friends have material which they are not willing to donate, we will be glad to receive it as a loan, to be carefully preserved and held subject to their order. Mr. W. B. McEWEN, a former agent of our Society in Georgia and Alabama, would find it to his interest to communicate at once with this office, and any friend knowing his whereabouts would confer a favor by informing us without delay.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Causes of the defeat of Gen. Lee's Army at the battle of Gettysburg-opinions of leading Confederate soldiers. (search)
ur own deductions. Very respectfully, &c., (Signed) A. L. L. Long. Letter from General Fitz. Lee. Richland, Stafford co., Va., March 5th, 1877. Rev. J. Wm. Jones, Secretary Southern Historical Society: My dear Sir: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter enclosing a copy of a communication from -tice to Stuart, it may be said that he had calculated upon the brigade of Jenkins and White's batallion of cavalry, which accompanied Generals Ewell and Early, and Jones' and Robertson's brigades, which were left to guard the passes of the Blue Ridge, and were to rejoin General Lee as soon as the enemy crossed the river, to do all Fitzhugh Lee. Letter from Colonel William Allan, of Ewell's staff. McDoNOUGH School, Owings' Mill, Baltimore county, Md., April 26th, 1877. Rev. J. W. Jones, D. D. My dear Sir: The questions asked in the letter ofof January 21st, 1877, in regard to Gettysburg, are more or less fully discussed in my article on Get
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Causes of the Confederate defeat at Gettysburg. (search)
they know of the great battle. Letter from General E. P. Alexander, late Chief of artillery First corps, A. N. V. Montgomery, Ala., March 17th, 1877. Rev. J. Wm. Jones, Secretary: Dear Sir: I have your favor of the 27th ult., enclosing copy of letter from ---- , giving an outline of his views of the campaign and battle other purpose. Very respectfully, yours, E. P. Alexander. Letter from General C. M. Wilcox. Baltimore, Md., March 26th, 1877. Dear Sir: The Rev. J. Wm. Jones, Secretary of the Southern Historical Society, has favored me with a copy of your letter of January 21st, 1877, and at his request I give you such facts asfully and truly, C. M. Wilcox. Letter from General A. L. Long, military Secretary to General R. E. Lee. Charlottesville, Va., April, 1877. Rev. J. Wm. Jones, D. D., Secretary Southern Historical Society: The questions of-- , in relation to the invasion of Pennsylvania and the battle of Gettysburg, I will notice i
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Second paper by Colonel Walter H. Taylor, of General Lee's staff. (search)
d, at once ordered General French to move to Frederick with seven thousand men, to protect his communications, and thus made available a like number of men of the Army of the Potomac, who would otherwise have been detached for this service. On the side of the Confederates, the entire cavalry corps is included. That portion which General Stuart accompanied made a complete circuit of the Federal army, and only joined General Lee on the evening of the second day; and the brigades under Generals Jones and Robertson, which had been left to guard the passes of the Blue Ridge, did not rejoin the army until the third of July. Report of Brigadier-General R. L. Gibson of Operations in Vicinity of Nashville. [From the original Ms. signed in General Gibson's autograph.] Headquarters Gibson's brigade, near Tupelo, Miss., January 11th, 1865. Capt. J. M. Macon, A. A. G.: Captain: I have the honor, in compliance with orders from Division Headquarters, to submit the following report of opera
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Leading Confederates on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
eas, R. J. Deas. Letter from Major-General Henry Heth, of A. P. Hill's corps, A. N. V. [The following letter from General Heth was originally addressed to the Secretary of our Society, and was duly forwarded to our distinguished foreign correspondent, whose letter of enquiry to us called it forth. It has been recently published in the Philadelphia Times, but will be none the less acceptable to our readers as one of our Gettysburg series.] Richmond, Va., June, 1877. Rev. J. Wm. Jones, D. D., Secretary Southern Historical Society: My dear Sir:---- , referring to the invasion of Pennsylvania in 1863, says: The Army of Northern Virginia, when it invaded the Northern States, was more powerful than it had ever been before. If---- , in using the term more powerful, means that the numerical strength of the Army of Northern Virginia, on this occasion, was greater than ever before, he is wrong, as the subjoined statement of the strength of that army, taken from the official
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Official report of General R. L. Gibson of the defence and fall of the Spanish Fort. (search)
General St. John Liddell, at Blakely, and by him directed to move towards Deer Park, near Fish river, and with two regiments of Holtzclaw's brigade, Colonel Bush. Jones commanding, and Colonel P. B. Spence's cavalry, to hold the enemy in observation. The following day I disposed these troops for this purpose, and early the next m be hurried. From the end of the treadway they were conveyed in light boats to Battery Huger, and thence to Blakely in steamers, except a few under Colonel Bush. Jones, who was directed to go up the marsh to Blakely. My scouts had already moved along this route with a view of ascertaining whether it was practicable. This was ne co-operation and soldierly bearing: Brigadier-General J. F. Holtzclaw, commanding the left wing; Colonel J. A. Andrews, commanding Ector's brigade; Colonel Bush. Jones, commanding Holtzclaw's brigade; Colonel F. L. Campbell, commanding Gibson's brigade; Colonel Frank Zacherie, Colonel I. W. Patton, commanding the artillery; and a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Leading Confederates on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
is caused by the fact that he includes in his estimate the two cavalry brigades of Robertson and Jones, which had been left guarding the passes of the Blue Ridge when the last of our infantry and artcting Meade's communications to the rear, as was the case with French's command. Robinson's and Jones' brigades certainly numbered over 2,000 men, and very probably over 3,000. Take them from Colonthe cavalry that went into Pennsylvania at the time our army invaded that state, Robertson's and Jones' being left behind, as already stated. Even Hooker, who estimated our force that passed through very safe to assume that the whole of our cavalry in Pennsylvania, exclusive of Robertson's and Jones' brigades, did not exceed 6,000 or 7,000, at the most. Estimating the artillery at 4,000, whichngth must have been less than 60,000 by some 2,000 or 3,000; and even including Robertson's and Jones' brigades, it could not have exceeded that number more than a few hundred, if it reached it. It
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