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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 131 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 72 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 50 22 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 48 8 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 46 14 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 37 15 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 32 8 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for J. William Jones or search for J. William Jones in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General J. A. Early's report of the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
marched from Hamilton's Crossing, and having been joined by Jones's battalion of artillery, passed Spotsylvania C. H., Verdiet night and encamped, and Hays's and Gordon's brigades with Jones's battalion of atillery and the division trains encamped only on the morning of the 13th Hays's and Gordon's brigades, Jones's artillery and the trains were crossed over to the north sith's brigades, and the rest of the artillery, all under Col. Jones, to the left (west and north-west), following the Cedar and some pieces of artillery well supported. Meanwhile Col. Jones had quietly prepared for running his artillery into positly demoralized by the artillery fire. The artillery under Jones was divided so as to put twelve pieces in the old orchard mt direction. About an hour by sun, everything being ready, Jones ran his pieces by hand into position, and opened almost simed forward Smith's brigade to the support, and also ordered Jones to advance with the pieces that were posted on our left, le
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
nteresting movements, and an eloquent tribute to the skill of our leaders, and the heroism of our men which emblazoned Chancellorsville on the tattered battle flag of the Army of Northern Virginia. General Lee spoke throughout in a strong, clear voice, and his every word could be heard in the most remote parts of the hall. The closest attention was paid to the speaker, and all the finer passages of the lecture were received with warm and generous applause. At the close of the lecture, Dr. Jones, in a few well chosen words, thanked the people of Charleston for the more than cordial manner in which they had received General Lee and himself, and for the magnificent audience which had greeted the lecturer. He expressed also his particular gratification at the official recognition of the work of his Society, which had been so frankly vouchsafed by the city authorities. Those who desired to aid the Society further by subscription to the Southern Historical Society papers, he referred