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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 24 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Jones, Jacob -1850 (search)
Jones, Jacob -1850 Naval officer; born near Smyrna, Del., in March, 1768; graduated at the University of Pennsylvania, Jacob Jones. and entered the navy as a midshipman in 1799. He was an officer of the Philadelphia when she was captured at Tripoli. In 1810 he was made commander, and when the War of 1812-15 broke out he was in charge of the sloop-of-war Wasp, in which he gained a victory. He commanded the Macedonian, in Decatur's squadron, as post-captain. After the war he commanded tJacob Jones. and entered the navy as a midshipman in 1799. He was an officer of the Philadelphia when she was captured at Tripoli. In 1810 he was made commander, and when the War of 1812-15 broke out he was in charge of the sloop-of-war Wasp, in which he gained a victory. He commanded the Macedonian, in Decatur's squadron, as post-captain. After the war he commanded the Mediterranean squadron; was a commissioner of the navy board; and governor of the naval asylum at Philadelphia. Congress voted him thanks and a gold medal and several States presented him with swords. He died in Philadelphia, Aug. 3, 1850.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Jones, James Athearn 1790-1853 (search)
Jones, James Athearn 1790-1853 Author; born in Tisbury, Mass., June 4, 1790; received a common-school education, and engaged in journalism in Philadelphia in 1826; later was editor in Baltimore, Md., and in Buffalo, N. Y. His publications include Traditions of the North American Indians, or tales of an Indian camp; Gold medal awarded by Congress to Jacob Jones. Letter to an English gentleman on English libels of America; and Haverhill, or memoirs of an officer in the army of Wolfe. He died in Brooklyn, N. Y., in August, 1853.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Medals. (search)
wpensGold. March 9, 1781Lieut.-Col. William A. WashingtonVictory of the CowpensSilver. March 9, 1781Lieut.-Col. John E. HowardVictory of the CowpensSilver. Oct. 29, 1781Maj.-Gen. Nathanael GreeneVictory at Eutaw SpringsGold. Oct. 16, 1787Capt. John Paul JonesCapture of the Serapis, 1779Gold. March 29, 1800Capt. Thomas TruxtonAction with the Vengeance (French)Gold. March 3, 1805Com. Edward PrebleTripoliGold. Jan. 29, 1813Capt. Isaac HullCapture of the GuerriereGold. Jan. 29, 1813Capt. Jacob JonesCapture of the FrolicGold. Jan. 29, 1813Capt. Stephen DecaturCapture of the MacedonianGold. March 3, 1813Capt. William BainbridgeCapture of the JavaGold. Jan. 6, 1814Lieut. Edward R. McCallCapture of the BoxerGold. Jan. 6, 1814Com. Oliver H. PerryVictory on Lake ErieGold. Jan. 6, 1814Capt. Jesse D. ElliottVictory on Lake ErieGold. Jan. 11, 1814Capt. James LawrenceCapture of the PeacockGold. Oct. 20, 1814Com. Thomas MacdonoughVictory on Lake ChamplainGold. Oct. 20, 1814Capt. Robe
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Navy of the United States (search)
President of the United States proclaimed war against Great Britain, July 19, 1812, the navy consisted of only twenty vessels, exclusive of gunboats. They were as follows: Name.Rated.MountedCommanders. Constitution4458Capt. Hull. United States4458Capt. Decatur. President4458Com. Rodgers. Chesapeake3644Capt. Smith. New York3644Ordinary. Constellation3644Ordinary. Congress3644Ordinary. Boston32Ordinary. Essex32Capt. Porter. Adams32Ordinary. John Adams26Capt. Ludlow. Wasp1618Capt. Jones. Hornet1618Capt. Lawrence. Siren16Lieut. Carroll. Argus16Lieut. Crane. Oneida16Lieut. Woolsey. Vixen12Lieut. Gadsden. Nautilus12Lieut. Sinclair. Enterprise12Capt. Blakeley. Viper12Capt. Bainbridge. The government early perceived the importance of having control of Lakes Ontario and Erie when the war began. Events in the early part of 1812 at the eastern end of Lake Ontario (see Sackett's Harbor), and the fact that the British were building war vessels at Kingston, made it importa
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Somers, the (search)
Samuel Cromwell, the boatswain's mate, and a seaman, Elisha Small. Spencer was arrested on Nov. 27, and the other two on the 28th, and put in irons. These three were convicted by a court on board, and sentenced to be hanged at the yard-arm, the sentence being carried into effect on Dec. 1, 525 miles from St. Thomas. the Somers arrived at New York, Dec. 14, with several of the boys in confinement. A naval court of inquiry, convened on Dec. 28, consisting of Commodores Charles Stewart, Jacob Jones, Alexander J. Dallas, and Ogden Hoffman, judge advocate, sat until Jan. 19, 1843, and decided that Commodore Mackenzie had simply performed his duty, etc. This court and verdict did not satisfy public opinion, and for a further vindication Mackenzie called for a regular court-martial, which was held at the Brooklyn navy-yard, and by a vote of nine to three also acquitted him. An attempt was now made to bring the case before the circuit court of the United States, but Judge Betts, although
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wasp, the (search)
built in Washington, D. C., in 1806. On Oct. 13, 1812, under command of Capt. Jacob Jones, thoroughly manned and equipped, carrying sixteen 32-pounder carronadesn and boys. She ran off towards the West Indies, and, on the night of Oct. 18, Jones saw several vessels, and ran parallel with them until the dawn, when he discove wounded was ninety men. the Wasp had only five men killed and five wounded. Jones placed Lieutenant Biddle in command of the Frolic, with orders to take her intoondition to flee or fight, and within two hours after he had gained his victory Jones was compelled to surrender both vessels. They were taken to Bermuda, where thectory of the Wasp over the Frolic caused much exultation in the United States. Jones was lauded in speeches and songs. The authorities of New York voted him a swor city. Congress voted him thanks and a gold medal, and appropriated $25,000 to Jones and his company as compensation for their loss of prize-money. A silver medal
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wilderness, battle of the (search)
tes dashed forward and penetrated their lines. But they were almost instantly repulsed, and Lee was compelled to abandon what he intended as a decisive assault. Night came on, and after dark Lee threw Ewell's corps forward against Sedgwick. There was some hard fighting and much confusion. Ewell captured the most of two brigades, and then fell back. So ended the battle in the Wilderness, without decisive results on either side, and with a mutually heavy loss. In the two days the Nationals lost about 18,000 men, of whom 6,000 were made prisoners. Generals Hays, Wadsworth, and Webb were killed. The Confederate loss was probably about 11,000. Generals Jones, Pickett, and Jenkins were killed. Longstreet's wounds disabled him for several months. The Wilderness is a wild plateau, covered with a dense growth of dwarf trees and vines and brambles, and sloping every way to cultivated fields. It is along the south bank of the Rapidan River, about 10 miles in width and 15 in length.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Wee Nee volunteers of Williamsburg District, South Carolina, in the First (Hagood's) regiment. (search)
rgeant J. F. Sanders, slightly in two places; Corporal John Manning, severely in leg; privates John Boyce, slightly; A. Vocelle, slightly in thigh; S. Wetherhorn, slightly in abdomen. Company F. Killed: Private R. D. Zimmerman. Wounded: Captain Martin A. Sellers, slightly in arm; Color Corporal J. W. Myers, mortally in abdomen; Corporal John Pritchett, mortally in abdomen; Corporal T. W. Ulmer, severely in temple; privates H. F. Dantzler, slightly in leg; H. Griffin, slightly in breast; J. Jones, slightly in breast; E. B. Stroke, slightly in arm. Company G. Killed: Sergeant J. E. Rast; private L. W. Jenkins. Wounded: Privates E. E. Inabinet, severely in leg; J. M. O. Holman, slightly; E. Ott, slightly in head; S. R. Hall, severely in leg. Company H. Killed: Private G. M. Howard. Wounded: Sergeant R. A. Horton, severely in hand; J. H. Pricket, slightly in head; W. H. Matthews, slightly in thigh. Company I. Wounded: Sergeant R. F. Ridgway, severely in arm; W. A. Lowder, s
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Old South. (search)
on, etc. Kentucky sent more men for the invasion of Canada than did any other State. All honor to the United States sailors of the North, who had no sympathy with the Hartford Convention, and nobly did their duty— Perry, Bainbridge, Stewart, Lawrence, Porter, Preble, &c. The Don't Give up the Ship of dying Lawrence is a precious legacy to the whole American people. But the unmaritime South claims, among the naval heroes of that period, Decatur, of Maryland; MacDonough, of Delaware; Jacob Jones, of same State; the two Shubricks, of South Carolina; Jesse D. Elliott, of Maryland; Blakely, of North Carolina, etc. A very large proportion of the naval heroes of the war of 1812 came from Maryland. In the Mexican war, the commanders-in-chief on both lines were born in Virginia, one of whom became President for his exploits, and the other an unsuccessful candidate for the Presidency. This war was unpopular in the North, and hence the South furnished the troops to carry it on, out of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
Jervey, Henry, 34 Johnson, Gen. B. R , 183, 231. Johnson, Col. Edward, 88, 90. Johnson, Lt., 379. Johnson, Lt. Polk G., 107, 349. Johnson's Tour, cited, 14. Johnson's Traditions of S. C., 9. Johnston, Gen. A. S., 69, 274, 308, 317. Johnston. Gen. Jos. E., 25, 68; Narrative, cited, 85, 98,204; forces of in 1862, 256, 294, 308. Johnston, Major, J. Stoddard, 58, 61, 68. Johnston, Col., Wm. Preston, 309, 317. Jones, Cadwalader, 19, 20, 21. Jones, Col., Charles, 304. Jones, Jr., Col. C. C., address of, 270. Jones, E., 96. Jones, Capt., Elcan, 91, 98. Jones, Capt F. C., 306. Jones, Gen., 393. Jones, J. W , 175. Jones, Rev. Dr. J Wm., 195, 205. Jones, Gen., Sam., 179. Jonesboroa, Battle of, 372. Jones' Farm, Battle of, 21. Jordan, Lt. J. W., 277. Jordan, Gen., Thomas, 297, 318. Joshua as a military leader, 197. Kearse, Col., 393. Keitt, Col. L. M., 130, 157, 169. Kellers, Corp. F. M., 192. Kellogg, Col. S. C., 349. Kelley, Gen., 215. Kell