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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 53 1 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 4, 1865., [Electronic resource] 10 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 6, 1865., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 19, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion 1 1 Browse Search
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they could not choke. “The news! what news?” “Oh, bitter news — they've fired upon the Flag-- The Flag no foreign foe could blast, the traitors down would drag.” II. “The truest flag of liberty The world has ever seen-- The Stars that shone o'er Washington, And guided gallant Greene! The white and crimson Stripes which bode Success in peace and war, Are draggled, shorn, disgraced, and torn-- Insulted Star by Star. That Flag, whose symbol'd virtues are the pining nation's codes, The Flag of Jones at Whitehaven, of Reid at Fayal Roads. III. “Eh, neighbor, canst believe this thing?” The neighbor's eyes grew wild; Then o'er them crept a haze of shame, As o'er a sad, proud child; His face grew pale, he bit his lip, Until the hardy skin, By passion tightened, could not hold The boiling blood within; He quivered for a moment, the indignant stupor broke, And the duties of the soldier in the citizen awoke. IV. On every side the crimson tide Ebbs quickly to and fro; On maiden cheeks
Battle of Leesburg.--One personal encounter is worthy of record. As Captain Jones, of Company B, Seventeenth Mississippi, was passing through the woods at the head of his men, he met another party headed by an officer. The two halting instantly upon discovering their close proximity, Jones exclaimed, For God Almighty's sake, tell me quick-friends or enemies — who are you? The other replied, We are friends, and at the same time advanced. A little boy, named Joseph Ware, who was behind thed out, Captain, they are not friends; don't you see they have not guns like ours. They are Yankees, let me shoot. Again Jones exclaimed, Who are you? Speak quick, for I can't keep my men from firing. I'll let you know who we are, you d — d rebel, said the Yankee officer, for such he was, and suiting the action to the word, he sprang upon and seized Captain Jones by the collar. For a second or two a scuffle ensued between the officers, when the latter broke loose. At the same instant one
s to be purchased in Europe, does not seem a perfectly satisfactory explanation. Those who know Captain Pegram would not be surprised to hear of any brilliant achievement being performed by him, of which the Nashville is capable, before he reports himself again to the Navy Department in this city. If the good people of some New England seaport town should wake up one of these fine mornings, and find their homes in flames, they may console themselves with reading of the exploits of one John Paul Jones of the long, long ago. It is now Thursday evening. Last week at the same time I felt very well assured that before set of sun to-day great events would have happened all around and very near us. Yet every thing is quiet as before at the critical points on the border. Not a word more of the 40,000 Yankees that landed at Newport News. Nothing farther of the advance upon Winchester. All serene at Centreville. Some artillery practice at transports attempting to go by the batteries at
fight in Albemarle Sound, N. C. A national account. Hatteras inlet, N. C., May 18, 1864. I venture to submit the following account of one of the most unusual and remarkable naval conflicts of this or any other war, in which the contending forces were so markedly disproportionate, and the result so contrary to preconceived ideas of iron-clad invincibility, that it may justly claim to take a historical position on the same page that records the brilliant exploits of Decatur and John Paul Jones. On the afternoon of May fifth, the Mattabesett, Sassacus, and Wyalusing, side-wheel gunboats, were lying at anchor in Albemarle Sound, twenty miles below the mouth of the Roanoke River, having been assigned the arduous duty of encountering, and, if possible, destroying the rebel iron-clad ram Albemarle, whose recent raid, in conjunction with the attack and capture of Plymouth, when she succeeded in capturing two of our gunboats, and sustained unharmed the repeated broadsides of the
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Preface (search)
Armstrong, she possesses the finest qualities of any ship I ever sailed in; rolls as easy as a cradle, and stands up under her canvas like a church. Lying under her stern is the captain's gig; her other boats seem to have been called away; probably one of the watches has gone ashore. Few annals in the history of the United States are of greater and more compelling interest than those connected with the achievement of its sailors. The descendants of Drake and Frobisher, led by John Paul Jones, Perry, Bainbridge, Porter, and other illustrious naval heroes in the days of lofty spars and topsails, made a name for themselves both on the sea and on the lasting scrolls of history. Their records, penned by historians and novelists, form brilliant pages in American literature. Therefore, it was not strange that a conflict in which officers and seamen of the same race and speech, graduates of the same historic Naval Academy and sailing the same seas and along the same shores, met i
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The most famous naval action of the Civil war (search)
fighting all the contested points of this battle over again. It was a drawn fight, bravely fought, and there is honor enough for both. The thrill of the meeting between these two armored ships was in its novelty. The results were in the reconstruction of the navies of the world. Neither vessel long survived their famous encounter, and the Merrimac was the first to finish her days. Owing to Flag-Officer Buchanan's injuries, the command on that memorable 9th of March had fallen on Lieutenant Jones, and he was relieved before the end of the month by Flag-Officer Josiah Tatnall. Though the Monitor stayed close at hand, there was no further meeting after her valiant foe was released from the drydock on April 4th. When Norfolk was evacuated by the Confederates, on the 10th of May, the further disposition of the Merrimac became a grave problem. Tatnall had her lightened three feet in order to take her up the James, but the pilots refused to attempt this in the face of a westerly
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval chronology 1861-1865: important naval engagements of the Civil war March, 1861-June, 1865 (search)
isoners and stores at Smith-field, Va. April 19, 1864. Attack on Federal vessels under Lieut.-Comdr. C. W. Flusser by Confed. ram Albemarle, Comdr. J. W. Cooke, at Plymouth, N. C.; sinking of U. S. S. South-field and death of Flusser. April 23, 1864. U. S. gunboat Petrel captured by Confederates on the Yazoo River. April 25, 1864. Confederates in strong force attacked 3 of Adml. Porter's gunboats on the Red River. May, 1864. May 6, 1864. U. S. gunboat Commodore Jones blown up by Confed. torpedo in James River. May 13, 1864. Adml. Porter's fleet above Alexandria Falls released by Col. Bailey's dam. June, 1864. June 3, 1864. Capture of U. S. S. Water Witch, Lieut.-Comdr. Austin Pendergrast by boat expedition under Lieut. J. P. Pelot, C. S. N., in Ossabaw Sound, Ga., Lieut. Pelot killed. June 19, 1864. The Confed. cruiser Alabama, Capt. Semmes, was sunk off the harbor of Cherbourg, France, by U. S. sloop-of-war Kearsarge, C
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Jones, John Paul 1747- (search)
His seat was at the mouth of the Dee. John Paul Jones. Jones anchored his vessel, the Ranger, ie mansion and plunder it of the family plate. Jones would not listen to the proposition, for the m medal presented to John Paul Jones. were sold Jones bought this plate, and sent it back to Lady Se guns), stretching out from Flamborough Head. Jones signalled for a chase, and all but the Allianc their spars and rigging became entangled, and Jones attempted to board his antagonist. A short coest with pike, pistol, and cutlass ensued, and Jones was repulsed. The vessels separated, and werethe rigging of the Serapis, and by their light Jones saw that his double-headed shot had cut the mathe North Sea. For this victory Congress gave Jones the thanks of the nation, a gold medal and a commission as commander of Jones raising the first flag ever displayed on a United States ship-of- presented to France. The King of France made Jones a knight of the Order of Merit, and presented [12 more...]
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), MacKENZIEenzie, Alexander Slidell 1803-1848 (search)
l apprentices, he discovered a mutinous plot on board, and immediately called a council of officers, which after a careful examination advised that the three persons principally involved in the affair be executed. On Dec. 1, 1842, the decision was put into effect. Soon after the Somers reached New York a court of inquiry began an investigation, which fully approved Mackenzie's action, and later he was acquitted by a court-martial before which he was tried. He was, however, severely criticised by many, as the young men whom he had executed were of good social standing, one of them being a son of John C. Spencer, then Secretary of War. The decision of the court-martial did not quiet this criticism, which greatly embittered the remainder of Mackenzie's life. His publications include Popular essays on naval subjects; The American in England; Life of John Paul Jones; Life of Commodore Oliver H. Perry; Life of Commodore Stephen Decatur, etc. He died in Tarrytown, N. Y., Sept. 13, 1848.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Medals. (search)
. Henry LeeSurprise of Paulus HookGold. Nov. 3, 1780John PauldingCapture of AndreSilver. Nov. 3, 1780David WilliamsCapture of AndreSilver. Nov. 3, 1780Isaac Van WartCapture of AndreSilver. March 9, 1781Brig.-Gen. Daniel MorganVictory of the CowpensGold. March 9, 1781Lieut.-Col. William A. WashingtonVictory of the CowpensSilver. March 9, 1781Lieut.-Col. John E. HowardVictory of the CowpensSilver. Oct. 29, 1781Maj.-Gen. Nathanael GreeneVictory at Eutaw SpringsGold. Oct. 16, 1787Capt. John Paul JonesCapture of the Serapis, 1779Gold. March 29, 1800Capt. Thomas TruxtonAction with the Vengeance (French)Gold. March 3, 1805Com. Edward PrebleTripoliGold. Jan. 29, 1813Capt. Isaac HullCapture of the GuerriereGold. Jan. 29, 1813Capt. Jacob JonesCapture of the FrolicGold. Jan. 29, 1813Capt. Stephen DecaturCapture of the MacedonianGold. March 3, 1813Capt. William BainbridgeCapture of the JavaGold. Jan. 6, 1814Lieut. Edward R. McCallCapture of the BoxerGold. Jan. 6, 1814Com. Oliver H
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