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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 63 11 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 54 20 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 32 8 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 31 21 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 8 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 19 17 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 15 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Department (search)
lished, relating to the treatment, diseases, mortality, and exchange of prisoners of war. 19. The conduct of the hostile armies in the Southern States. Private and public losses during the war. Treatment of citizens by hostile forces. 20. Southern poetry, ballads, songs, etc. The following are the officers of the Southern Historical Society, under the re-organization: Parent Society, Richmond, Va.--Gen. Jubal A. Early, President; Hon. Robert M. T. Hunter, Vice-President; Rev. J. Wm. Jones, Secretary and Treasurer. Executive Committee.--Gen. Dabney H. Maury, Chairman; Col. Charles S. Venable, Col. Wm. Preston Johnson, Col. Robert E. Withers, Col. Joseph Mayo, Col. Geo. W. Munford, Lt. Col. Archer Anderson, Maj. Robert Stiles, George L. Christian, Esq. Vice-Presidents of States.--Gen. Isaac R. Trimble, Maryland; Gov. Zebulon B. Vance, North Carolina; Gen. M. C. Butler, South Carolina; Gen. A. H. Colquit, Georgia; Admiral R. Semmes, Alabama; Col. W. Call, Florida; Ge
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Letter from General J. E. Johnston. (search)
Letter from General J. E. Johnston. Rev. J. William Jones, D. D., Secretary Southern Historical Society: Dear Sir — In the account of The Seven days fighting published by your Society in the June No. of the Southern Magazine, there are some errors as to the strength of the Army of Northern Virginia in the beginning of June, 1862. As they contradict previous statements of mine, I beg leave to point them out. In the statement of the strength of Holmes' division, at least 4,000 brought by him to the army from Petersburg, June 1st, are omitted; only those brought at the end of the month are referred to — they may have been 6,500. In that of Longstreet's, the strength was near 14,000 June 1st. The six brigades that then joined it had been reduced to 9,000 when they marched, late in August, to Northern Virginia. The cavalry could not have exceeded 3,000, nor the reserve artillery 1,000, June 1st. G. W. Smith's division of five brigades amounted to near 13,000 June 1st; only
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A Correction. (search)
A Correction. Selma, Ala., March 11th, 1875. Dr. J. Wm. Jones, Secretary Southern Historical Society, Richmond, Va.: Dear Sir — I wish to correct my narrative of the services of the Ironclad Virginia, in which the Teaser, Beaufort and Raleigh are called tugs. In the fight they did good service as gunboats, and should have been so designated. The Beaufort had a converted, single-banded rifle gun, 32-pound calibre, and a 24-pound carronade. The Teaser and Raleigh were, I think, similarly armed. Please annex this to my narrative, and you will oblige, Your obedient servant, Catesby Ap. R. Jones.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Capture of the Indianola. (search)
Capture of the Indianola. Rev. John William Jones, Secretary of the Southern Historical Society: Sir — The last September number of the Southern Magazine contained an article in relation to the capture of the Federal ironclad Indianola. The article, in the absence of other information, draws its narrative principally from letters published in the Northern press during the war. It would manifestly be unjust to the officers and men who effected the capture to allow the facts stated in the article to remain the only record in the archives of the Historical Society. I deem it proper, therefore, to vindicate the truth of history by transmitting to you the order of General Taylor organizing the expedition, the official report of the engagement with and capture of the Indianola, which report, I believe, has never yet been published. For the better understanding of the report, it is well to briefly describe the Confederate rams that effected the capture. The Webb was an ordi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
Surgeon-General Barnes show that a much larger per cent. of Confederates perished in Northern prisons than of Federals in Southern prisons. And though the most persistent efforts were made to get up a case against President Davis, General Lee and others (even to the extent of offering poor Wirz a reprieve if he would implicate them), they were not able to secure testimony upon which even Holt and his military court dared to go into the trial. We have a large mass of documents on this subject, and the Secretary has been busy compiling them. But it is earnestly requested that any of our friends who have facts and figures bearing on the question in any of its branches, which they are willing to give (or lend) to the Society, will at once forward them to the Secretary, Rev. J. Wm. Jones, Richmond, Va. Let us unite in making the discussion full, thorough, and a complete vindication of our long slandered people. Will not our Southern papers call special attention to this matter?
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The treatment of prisoners during the war between the States. (search)
er comment on this charge, your committee report that the practice of firing on our prisoners by the guards in the Northern prisons appears to have been indulged in to a most brutal and atrocious extent. See the depositions of C. C. Herrington, William F. Gordon, Jr., J. B. McCreary, Dr. Thomas P. Holloway, and John P. Fennell. At Fort Delaware a cruel regulation as to the use of the sinks was made the pretext for firing on and murdering several of our men and officers, among them Lieutenant-Colonel Jones, who was lame, and was shot down by the sentinel while helpless and feeble and while seeking to explain his condition. Yet this sentinel was not only not punished, but was promoted for his act. At Camp Douglas as many as eighteen of our men are reported to have been shot in a single month. These facts may well produce a conviction, in the candid observer, that it is the North and not the South that is open to the charge of deliberately and wilfully destroying the lives of the pris
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of Colonel D. T. Chandler, (search)
n is now Rector of the University of Virginia, and is an accomplished scholar and a high-toned Christian gentleman, whose lightest word may be implicitly relied upon. Mr. Kean has sent us the following letter, which, though hastily written and not designed for publication, gives so clear a history of this report that we shall take the liberty of publishing it in full: Letter of Hon. B. G. H. Kean, Chief clerk of the Confederate war Department. Lynchburg, Va., March 22, 1876. Rev. J. William Jones, Secretary Southern Historical Society: My Dear Sir-Yours of the 20th is received this A. M., and I snatch the time from the heart of a busy day to reply immediately, because I feel that there is no more imperious call on a Confederate than to do what he may to hurl back the vile official slanders of the Federal Government at Washington in 1865, when Holt, Conover & Co., with a pack of since convicted perjurers, were doing all in their power to blacken the fame of a people whose p
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Book notices. (search)
military biography of Stonewall Jackson. By Colonel John Esten Cooke. With an appendix (containing an account of the Inauguration of Foley's statue, &c.), by Rev. J. Wm. Jones. General Joseph E. Johnston's Narrative. Personal Reminiscences, Anecdotes and letters of General R. E. Lee. By Rev. J. Wm. Jones, D. D. Sherman's MemoiRev. J. Wm. Jones, D. D. Sherman's Memoirs and Shuckers' Life of Chief justice Chase. From the publishers, Harper Brothers, New York (through West & Johnston, Richmond): Draper's Civil war in America. From J. B. Lippincott, Philadelphia (through West & Johnston): Dixon's New America. From West & Johnston, Richmond: A beautiful lithograph of the Ordinance advertisements at the following rates:  12 mos.6 mos.3 mos.1 mo. 1 page$75$40$25$10 1/2 page4025156 1/4 page251583 We desire to secure everywhere suitable agents to canvass for members of the Society, or subscribers to our papers. Address Rev. J. William Jones, Secretary Southern Historical Society, Richmond, Va
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Book notices. (search)
ich appeared in a previous edition, has been corrected in the edition before us. A military biography of Stonewall Jackson. By Colonel John Esten Cooke. With an appendix (containing an account of the Inauguration of Foley's statue), by Rev. J. Wm. Jones. D. Appleton & Co., New York. Cooke's Life of Jackson was originally published during the war, and was rewritten, and republished in 1866. The enterprising publishers have brought out a new edition with an Appendix added, which containves some exceedingly vivid pictures of old Stonewall on his rawbone sorrel, there are important errors in the narrative which ought by all means to be corrected. Personal Reminiscences. Anecdotes and letters of General R. E. Lee. By Rev. J. Wm. Jones, D. D. D. Appleton & Co., New York. We cannot, of course, give an unbiased judgment of this book. But we may say this, that the letters of General Lee, which the author was so fortunate as to secure, are among the most charming specimens o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Letter from Captain William L. Ritter. (search)
Letter from Captain William L. Ritter. Rev. John William Jones, Secretary Southern Historical Society, Richmond, Va.: Dear Sir — The February number of the Southern Historical Society Papers contains an article from Major J. L. Brent in relation to the capture of the iron-clad Indianola, in which mention is made of the name of Sergeant Edward H. Langley, of the Third Maryland Artillery, who had immediate charge of the two Parrot-guns aboard the Queen of the West. As Sergeant Langley belonged to the battery of which I was a member, I desire to relate a few incidents connected with the closing scenes of his life, and to mention the fate of his successor, Lieutenant William Thompson Patten. When the two gun detachments were put aboard the steamer Archer, January 23d, 1863, and sent down the river in charge of Sergeant Langley, there was but one commissioned officer with the battery in Vicksburg, the others having not yet arrived from Tennessee. On the 26th the steamer De S
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