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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 4 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
unselor, and patron. Although born in the city of Philadelphia on the 19th of July, 1827, Mr. George Wymberley-Jones DeRenne was, in every thought and emotion, a Georgian most loyal. In the paternal line he was the direct descendant of Captain Noble Jones, the trusted Lieutenant of Oglethorpe, whose watchful eye and brave sword were ever instant for the protection of the infant colony against the enroachments of the jealous Spaniards and the incursions of the restless Indians. Our early re soft sunlight, swelling tides, inviting prospects, and cherished traditions, this attractive spot had uninterruptedly continued to be the home of his ancestors from the date of its original cession from the Crown to his great grandfather, Captain Noble Jones. Here were the remains of the tabby fortification which he had constructed for the protection of his plantation, then an outpost to the town of Savannah, and there vine-covered and overshadowed by oaks and cedars, they will endure for unn
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Dr. G. W. Derenne. (search)
unselor, and patron. Although born in the city of Philadelphia on the 19th of July, 1827, Mr. George Wymberley-Jones DeRenne was, in every thought and emotion, a Georgian most loyal. In the paternal line he was the direct descendant of Captain Noble Jones, the trusted Lieutenant of Oglethorpe, whose watchful eye and brave sword were ever instant for the protection of the infant colony against the enroachments of the jealous Spaniards and the incursions of the restless Indians. Our early re soft sunlight, swelling tides, inviting prospects, and cherished traditions, this attractive spot had uninterruptedly continued to be the home of his ancestors from the date of its original cession from the Crown to his great grandfather, Captain Noble Jones. Here were the remains of the tabby fortification which he had constructed for the protection of his plantation, then an outpost to the town of Savannah, and there vine-covered and overshadowed by oaks and cedars, they will endure for unn