hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 1 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 24, 1864., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 5 results in 4 document sections:

Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The first fight of iron-clads. (search)
ack to her buoy. During the month of April, 1862, our forces, under General J. E. Johnston, had retired from the Peninsula to the neighborhood of Richmond, to defend the city against McClellan's advance by way of the Peninsula, and from time to time rumors of the possible evacuation of Norfolk reached us. On the 9th of May, while at anchor off Sewell's Point, we noticed at sunrise that our flag was not flying over the batteries. A boat was sent ashore and found them abandoned. Lieutenant Pembroke Jones was then dispatched to Norfolk, some miles distant, to call upon General Huger, who was in command, and learn the condition of affairs. He returned during the afternoon, reporting, to our great surprise, the town deserted by our troops and the navy yard on fire. This precipitate retreat was entirely unnecessary, for while the Virginia remained afloat, Norfolk was safe, or, at all events, was not tenable by the enemy, and James River was partly guarded, for we could have retired b
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 12: fight between the Merrimac and Monitor, March 8, 1862. (search)
e and then overwhelm him with the Monitor, heavy frigates and powerful rams that were prepared to attack him. That was the last appearance of the Merrimac. According to a Confederate account: On the 9th of May, while at anchor off Sewell's Point, it was noticed at Lieut. John Taylor Wood, of the Merrimac. (afterwards commander of the privateer Tallahassee.) sundown that the Confederate flag was not flying over the batteries. A boat was sent on shore and found them abandoned. Lieut. Pembroke Jones was then dispatched to Norfolk, and returned with the news that Norfolk was evacuated, and the Navy Yard on fire. That determined the fate of the Merrimac. Her occupation was gone, and to prevent her from falling into the hands of the Federal Government, she was blown up and entirely destroyed. Several plans had been proposed to save the vessel for further use, such as lightening her and getting her up the James River as a protection to Richmond, but they were found impractica
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), chapter 11 (search)
fith. Second-Lieutenant, J. A. V. Pue, Edward Beatty. First-Sergeant, John H. Scholl. Sergeants, Hammond Dorsey, Frank Griffith, Joshua Riggs, Chas. R. Cockey. Corporals, Wm. Wilson, Bazil Clark, Arthur Bond, John Harding. Company B—Captain, Geo. M. Emack. FirstLieuten-ant, Mason E. McKnew. Second-Lieutenant, Adolphus Cook, Henry C. Blackiston. First-Sergeant, S. B. Spencer. Sergeants, W. A. Wilson, W. H. W. Guyther, D. M. Turner, O. H. Perry. Corporals, G. M. Serpell, J. J. Spear, Pembroke Jones, J. R. H. Deakins, Robert Carvell. Company C—Captain, Robert C. Smith. FirstLieuten-ant, Geo. Howard. Second-Lieutenant, T. Jeff Smith, T. J. Green, Graeme Turnbull, Jas. D. Walters. First-Sergeant, Illinois Carruthers. Sergeants, Geo. Smith Norris, E. Clarence Neale, Wm. F. Dorsey, Hamilton Lefevre. Corporals, Richard Knox, Richard C. Smith, LaFayette Hause. Company D—Captain, Warner G. Welch. First-Lieu. tenant, Wm. H. Dorsey. Second-Lieutenant, Stephen D. Lawrence, Milton W<
A Trip of the iron clad Raleigh. --The iron clad Raleigh ran out of Wilmington, N. C., the other night, but did not succeed in bagging any of the blockaders. The Wilmington Journal has the following account of the adventure: Last evening the iron-clad Raleigh, Lieutenant Pembroke Jones commanding, bearing the broad pennant of flag officer Lynch, steamed out of New Inlet in quest of the enemy. Not long after leaving the bar the Raleigh met a blockader cruising about, and gave her a 7 inch shot crashing through her sides. The Federal vessel being unused to such an encounter immediately left, making signals to the fleet. The iron-clad continued her cruise until after midnight, when an unsuspecting blockader, taking her for a blockade runner, fired a shot and ran down to pick up a prize; but instead of receiving the surrender of an unarmed Anglo rebel, Jonathan was complimented by a bill that was more surprising than agreeable. Thinking, in his wonder, that he had been fi