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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 2 Browse Search
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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
ny H, J. E. Ritch, W. A. Cain; Company I, W. B. Young, William Duke; Company K, F. E. Eve, J. J. Floyd; Company L, A. M. Rogers. Even after the reorganization as the Ninth Georgia cavalry this fine body of troops was called Cobb's legion to the last. From the opening of the spring campaign of 1864 to the close of the war it was in Hampton's command. Phillips' Georgia legion, another of the commands organized by June 1, 1861, had for its field officers: Col. William Phillips, Lieut.-Col. Seaborn Jones, Jr.; Maj. John D. Wilcoxon, and Adjt. James H. Lawrence. The infantry captains were O. R. Daniel (A), R. T. Cook (B), E. S. Barclay (C), H. F. Wimberly (D), Joseph Hamilton (E), Jackson Barnes (F), Charles Dubignon (G), W. W. Rich (H), W. B. C. Puckett (I), R. S. Y. Lowry (K), J. M. Johnson (L), J. F. McClesky (M), S. S. Dunlap (N), T. K. Sproull (0), W. W. Thomas (P). The cavalry captains were J. H. Nicholls (A), Wm. H. Rich (B), E. C. Hardin (C), P. L. Y. Long (D), A. F. Hunter (E
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
nor McDonald, solicitor-general of the Chattahoochee circuit to fill a vacancy, and in 1838 was elected by the general assembly for a full term of four years. Upon his marriage in the fall of the next year with Mary Howard, only daughter of Col. Seaborn Jones, a very eminent lawyer of Columbus, he resigned his position and formed a partnership with Colonel Jones in the practice of law. In 1850, he and Martin J. Crawford and James N. Ramsey were delegates to the Southern convention at Nashville, Colonel Jones in the practice of law. In 1850, he and Martin J. Crawford and James N. Ramsey were delegates to the Southern convention at Nashville, Tenn. In the fall of 1853, when less than forty years of age, he was elected one of the justices of the Supreme court of Georgia, a position he held for the full term of six years. His decisions are noted for clearness, ability and loyalty to the best settled legal principles. He was a man of absolutely crystal truth. He had a candor and directness proverbial. He spoke with a low, guttural tone and a syllabic precision, that heightened the idea of his manly force of character. He was able t