Browsing named entities in John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Charles Jones or search for Charles Jones in all documents.

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the city, except the cannoneers. Capt. J. B. Anderson, of Company E, Louisiana artillery, although wounded early in the conflict, continued to render the most gallant service to the end. Of the same company, Lieutenant Baylor, of the 42-pounder barbette battery, and Lieutenant Agar deserve mention. Among those who acted coolly during the six days, were Lieutenants Ogden, Kennedy and Mumford, of the Louisiana artillery; Lieutenant Gaines, in command of the 32-pounder on the river front; Captain Jones, Company I, Twenty-third regiment Louisiana volunteers; Captain Peter, Company I, Twenty-second regiment volunteers; Lieut. Thomas K. Pierson, Twentythird regiment, who was killed while gallantly fighting his guns; Capt. M. T. Squires, senior officer at Fort St. Philip; and Lieut. Thomas B. Huger, of the McRae, who was seriously wounded. Speaking of the deserters, General Duncan, three weeks later, said: Scores of them have been daily going over to the enemy and enlisting since, unti
e among the officers wounded. Ruggles' division was mainly Louisiana troops, the other brigades being Patton Anderson's and Preston Pond's. Anderson's brigade included the Seventeenth, Twentieth, Response battalion, and Hodgson's artillery. Colonel Jones, and Lieutenant-Colonel Boyd (Twentieth) were wounded; Major Clack had two horses shot under him. Col. Preston Pond, Sixteenth, commanded a brigade including the Sixteenth, Eighteenth, Crescent, and battalion Orleans Guards. Colonel Martin an Allen; Eleventh volunteer infantry, Col. S. F. Marks; Twelfth volunteer infantry, Col. S. M. Scott; Thirteenth volunteer infantry, Col. Randall L. Gibson; Sixteenth volunteer infantry, Col. Preston Pond; Seventeenth volunteer infantry, Lieut.-Col. Charles Jones; Eighteenth volunteer infantry, Col. Alfred Mouton; Nineteenth volunteer infantry, Col. B. L. Hodge; Twentieth volunteer infantry, Col. August Reichard; the Crescent regiment (N. O.), Col. Marshall J. Smith; Confederate Guards Response
y during these clamorous reports of war Magruder favored his men with a new march—somewhat longer than his wont on the peninsula. On April 21st he retreated from the Warwick line in silence and mystery, with Richmond for his objective. McClellan, though fairly surprised, quickly followed on our rear with his entire army. He attacked the Confederate rear guard near Williamsburg. During the day, Magruder succeeded in keeping the swarming masses in check. Here the Fourteenth Louisiana, Colonel Jones, was actively engaged, and the gallantry of its commanding officer as well as of Lieutenant-Colonel York and Captains Leech and Bradley, is mentioned in the reports. A battalion of the Chasseurs-à--pied, Capt. M. G. Goodwyn commanding, which held one of the redoubts, and three pieces of the Donaldsonville artillery, under Lieutenant Fortier, are mentioned. At New bridge, on the Chickahominy, some days later (May 24th), the Fifth Louisiana, on picket duty, was suddenly attacked by a fo