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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 131 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 72 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 50 22 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 48 8 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 46 14 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 37 15 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 32 8 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for J. William Jones or search for J. William Jones in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Fifth annual meeting of the Southern Historical Society, October 31st., 1877. (search)
ch larger), we will have no difficulty in meeting all of our expenses. But we are in pressing need of means to enable us to adequately prosecute our great work, and we know not how a lover of the truth of history can better employ funds than by contributing them to the use of the Southern Historical Society. In conclusion, we would express our growing sense of the importance of collecting now, the material for a true history of our great struggle for Constitutional freedom, and we earnestly appeal to all who can add anything of value to our collection, to do so at once. By order of the Executive Committee. Dabney H. Maury, Chairman. J. Wm. Jones, Secretary. The report was unanimously adopted. The President then announced the selection of General E. W. Pettus, of Selma, as Vice-Pesident for Alabama; and Col. Thos. H. Carter, of King William county, Va., formerly Chief of Artillery of Rodes' Division, A. N. V., as a member of the Executive Committee to fill a vacancy.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Leading Confederates on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
ops from the gallant Old North State : Letter from General James H. Lane. Virginia Agricultural and Mechanical College, Blacksburg, October 20, 1877. Rev. J. Wm. Jones, Secretary Southern Historical Society, Richmond, Va.: My dear sir: As great injustice has been done my gallant old brigade of North Carolinians in all thto advance after the failure of Early's attack. And further: In this engagement our loss in men and officers was large. Major-Generals Hood and Pender, Brigadier-Generals Jones, Semmes, G. T. Anderson, and Barksdale, and Col. Avery (commanding Hoke's brigade) were wounded, the last two mortally. Generals Pender and Semmes died . Major Jos. A. Engelhard, Assist.-Adjutant-General Pender's Light Division. Letter from Colonel J. B. Walton. New Orleans, October 15th, 1877. Rev. J. Wm. Jones, D. D., Secretary Southern Historical Society, Richmond, Va.: Dear sir: My attention has been directed to the letter of Col. E. P. Alexander, of date of 17th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Our Gettysburg series. (search)
he very highest interest and value. We have thought proper to prefix these remarks to the letter which originated the series, which we now give in full as follows: Letter from the Count of Paris. Sevilla, January 21st, 1877. Rev. J. Wm. Jones, D. D., Secretary Southern Historical Society: Dear sir: I am writing the account of the battle of Gettysburg, and consider that chapter as the most important, the most difficult to write of the whole work which I have undertaken. I share tthe following letter will have an interest for all of our readers; but for those who knew the gallant Prussian, and appreciated his warm sympathy for our struggling people, it will have a peculiar interest.] Stuttgart, 21st Nov., 1877. Rev. J. Wm. Jones, Sec'y S. H. Soc'y: Dear sir: You will, perhaps, be surprised that a foreigner should desire to mingle in the discussion of the battle of Gettysburg; but I have some reasons which urge me to give you my opinion about that affair. 1. I w
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A correction of General Patton Andersons report of the battle of Jonesboro, Ga. (search)
events of the war.] Letter from General Clayton. Clayton, Ala., December 31, 1877. Rev. J. Wm. Jones, Secretary, &c., Richmond, Va.: Dear sir: My attention has been called to a report of t myself, and was composed of Gibson's brigade in the centre, Holtzclaw's brigade (Colonel Bush. Jones commanding) on the right, and Mannegault's brigade, of Anderson's division, on the left. StovalDiv., C. S. A. Letter from General S. D. Lee. Columbus, Miss., January 28, 1878. Rev. J. Wm. Jones, Secretary Southern Historical Society. My dear sir: In the November number of the Soutuly, S. D. Lee. Letter from General R. L. Gibson. Washington, January 22, 1878. Rev. J. Wm. Jones, Secretary, Richmond, Va.: Dear sir: My attention has been called by a member of the Th finally driven back, as was also Manigault's upon the left. Holzclaw's brigade, Colonel Bush. Jones commanding, which, except its left, had not been so warmly engaged, was subsequently withdrawn.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Torpedo service in the Harbor and water defences of Charleston. (search)
Torpedo service in the Harbor and water defences of Charleston. by General G. T. Beauregard. [The following article from the distinguished engineer and accomplished soldier who made the heroic defence of Charleston, has been delayed much longer than we had intended by circumstances over which we had no control.] Letter from General Beauregard. Rev. J. W. Jones, D. D., Secretary Southern Historical Society, Richmond, Virginia: Dear sir: During last summer several articles appeared in Northern papers, giving accounts of Russian torpedoes and torpedo-boats in the Danube, in which erroneous statements were made of the use of those engines of destruction at Charleston during our late civil war. To give a correct account of their use, as well as of other means employed by me to defend that city against the powerful naval and land batteries of the Federals, I prepared a paper on the subject for the Philadelphia Weekly Times, which, through accidental delays in transmission, di
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A review of the First two days operations at Gettysburg and a reply to General Longstreet by General Fitz. Lee. (search)
taken the advice of one who urged him not to attack. In the Rev. J. Wm. Jones' Personal Reminiscences, Anecdotes, and letters of Lee, pags rendered by the artillery under the immediate command of Lieutenant-Colonel Jones, and the general charge of the acting chief of artillery f Lieutenant-Colonel Carter's, Lieutenant-Colonel Andrews', Lieutenant-Colonel Jones', Colonel Brown's, and Lieutenant-Colonel Nelson's — the tthis road; while of the Second corps, Early's division, attended by Jones' artillery battalion was approaching from the direction of York, anafter the engagement was opened by those of the Third, Carter's and Jones' batteries were, at the time of our arrival, plied on the left with battalion, Third corps; two of Eshleman's, First corps; and one of Jones', Second corps, were detailed to report to General Imboden at Cash al E. P. Alexander. Montgomery, Ala., February 23, 1878. Rev. J. Wm. Jones, Secretary: Dear sir: The letter of Colonel J. B. Walton,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Letter from President Davis-reply to Mr. Hunter. (search)
on this subject, without comment of our own, except to say that both sides having been heard, we hope the distinguished gentlemen will now consent to close the controversy, at least in our pages.] Mississippi City, March 27th, 1878. Rev. J. W. Jones, D. D., Secretary of Southern Historical Society: Dear sir: In the December number of your magazine was published an article by Hon. R. M. T. Hunter, purporting to be a reply to my answer to his previous article published in a Northern paperspeak of him kindly-even affectionately. It is therefore with regret that I learn that a different state of feeling exists. Very sincerely yours, Wm. Preston Johnston. Letter from F. R. Lubbock. Galveston, March 21st, 1878. Rev. J. William Jones, Sec. S. H. Society, Richmond, Va.: Dear sir: I have quite recently seen in the Southern Historical Society Papers, for December last, a communication from the Hon. R. M. T. Hunter, of Virginia, purporting to be a rejoinder to a letter
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Colonel Taylor's reply to the Count of Paris. (search)
Colonel Taylor's reply to the Count of Paris. Norfolk, Va., March 8, 1878. Rev. J. William Jones, Secretary, &c., Richmond, Va.: My dear Mr. Jones: In compliance with your request, I enclose herewith the copy of the memorandum of the Count of Paris concerning the strength of the two armies at Gettysburg, sent to me by CoMr. Jones: In compliance with your request, I enclose herewith the copy of the memorandum of the Count of Paris concerning the strength of the two armies at Gettysburg, sent to me by Colonel Allan. I have only found time to read the same to-day. It is, in my judgment, as conclusive evidence as has yet been presented of the great disparity in the strength of the two armies, when one who deducts thirteen per cent. from the effective strength of the Army of the Potomac, and makes a further deduction of seven per cumbers, 67,000. So, also, after a careful review of all the evidence, I would say that General Meade had about 105,000. The Count contends that we should include Jones' and Robertson's brigades of cavalry, that reached us after the battle; but he is careful to exclude the troops taken from Harper's Ferry by General Meade and sent
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reply to General Longstreet's Second paper. (search)
tly thereafter, and, in that letter, he spoke in very complimentary terms of General Longstreet, but expressed a desire that the whole of General Lee's letter, from which the brief extract was given, should be published. This was the occasion of the publication of the communication in the New Orleans Republican, from General Longstreet, which has been referred to. That communication contained a bitter tirade of denunciation against General Fitz Lee, General William N. Pendleton, the Rev. J. William Jones, and myself, the greater part of it being directed against me. Thus originated the tom-tom warfare, in which the leading part on our side was borne by me, and two long articles were published on both sides. It implies no immoderate degree of vanity on my part to say that General Longstreet came out of the first campaign badly worsted. The only ground for his complaint against me has been already shown in my reply to his first article in the Philadelphia Times; and I will take occ
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Steuart's brigade at the battle of Gettysburg.--a narrative by Rev. Randolph H. McKim, D. D., late First Lieutenant and Aide-de-camp, Confederate army. (search)
Steuart's brigade at the battle of Gettysburg.--a narrative by Rev. Randolph H. McKim, D. D., late First Lieutenant and Aide-de-camp, Confederate army. Rev. J. Wm. Jones, D. D., Secretary Southern Historical Society: Dear sir: The sketch which I send herewith has been prepared at the urgent request of several of the survivors of the Third brigade, (Second corps, A. N. V.,) who think that justice to the memory of the heroic men of that command who gave up their lives at Gettysburg demands a more extended notice than has yet appeared of the part borne by them on that bloody field. (Owing to the fact that on the 3d July I was occupied chiefly on the right of the line, my narrative relates principally to the deeds of the regiments on the right.) In preparing the narrative my memory has been assisted by pocket memoranda, made on the field, and by letters written immediately after the events related. This enables me to hope that in all substantial points this account may be relied