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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 131 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 72 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 50 22 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 48 8 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 46 14 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 37 15 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 32 8 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for J. William Jones or search for J. William Jones in all documents.

Your search returned 30 results in 21 document sections:

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Colonel Baldwin's interview with Mr. Lincoln-letter from Colonel J. H. Keatley, of Iowa. (search)
Colonel Baldwin's interview with Mr. Lincoln-letter from Colonel J. H. Keatley, of Iowa. We publish the following letter as confirming the accuracy of Dr. Dabney's interesting report of Colonel John B. Baldwin's account of his interview with Mr. Lincoln. Council bluffs, Iowa, December 18, 1880. Rev. J. William Jones, D. D., Secretary Southern Historical Society, Richmond, Va.: Dear Sir,--I have just read, in the first volume of the Transactions of your society, Dr. Dabney's paper concerning an interview between Mr. Lincoln and Colonel John Baldwin, of Virginia, in April, 1861. In May, 1865, I was on duty, as a Federal military officer, in Norfolk, and while the United States District Court for the eastern district of Virginia was in session there. I was introduced to Colonel Baldwin at that time, in the clerk's office, by Honorable L. H. Chandler, United States District Attorney, Colonel Baldwin being then in attendance on some business connected with that court, and having
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), An official paper which was never sent. (search)
An official paper which was never sent. The following letter explains itself. We should be glad to learn something more concerning the lieutenants who wrote the document quoted: Council bluffs, Iowa, February 11, 1881. Dr. J. W. Jones, Secretary Southern Historical Society: Dear Sir,--In the winter of 1864 and the spring of 1865 I served in the Army of the Potomac, in front of Petersburg, and was present during the last gallant efforts of the Army of Northern Virginia. Upon reaching the inside of the Confederate works in the vicinity of the point where the Weldon railroad crossed the trenches I saw a bunch of papers, the one corner of which lay in a pool of blood. Near by was also the shattered carriage of a gun, indicating that one of our shells had dismounted it. Everywhere were the signs of a desperate struggle, though the dead and wounded had been removed. I picked up the package of papers, supposing that some poor fellow had dropped them as he fell, and they might le
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia, or the boys in gray, as I saw them from Harper's Ferry in 1861 to Appomattox Court-house in 1865. (search)
Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia, or the boys in gray, as I saw them from Harper's Ferry in 1861 to Appomattox Court-house in 1865. by J. Wm. Jones. [Prefatory Note.--The readers of our Papers will bear witness that the Secretary has not often troubled them with his own writing, preferring that our valuable space should be filled by other pens. As I have been, however, frequently urged by gentlemen, in whose judgment I have great confidence, to publish a series of papers which shall attempt a sketch of army life as I saw it, I have decided to yield to their solicitation, so far, at least, as to present several papers on different phases of the history of our grand old army. It is for others to say how far it may be desirable to continue them. My general design is (while preserving the strictest historic accuracy as to our great campaigns and battles, bringing out especially the great odds against which we fought) to draw a series of pictures of the prominent lead
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia. by J. Wm. Jones. Paper no. 2.--First Manassas and its Sequel. Remaining for some days longer in front of Winchester, and several times called into line of battle on false alarms, the private soldier was forming his own plan of campaign when our great commander received information that Beauregard was being attacked at Manassas, and determined at once to hasten to his relief. Accordingly, about noon on the 18th of July Johnston left a cordon of Stuart's cavalry to conceal the movement from General Patterson, and put his column in motion for Ashby's Gap and Manassas. As soon as we had gotten about two miles from Winchester there was read to us a ringing battle order from our chief, in which he stated that Beauregard was being attacked at Manassas by a greatly superior force — that this was a forced march to save the country, and that he expected us to step out bravely, to close up our ranks, and do all that could be required of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
ctfully, T. D. Jeffress. General Grant replied as follows on the bottom of the same sheet of paper: General Badeau's book, now in the hands of the printer, will give the exact truth of the matter referred to in this letter. There was no demand made for General Lee's sword, and no tender of it offered. U. S. Grant. We should be glad of an answer, by some one who can give the information, to the following courteous letter: Cambridgeport, mass., March 16, 1881. Rev. J. William Jones, Secretary Southern Historical Society: My Dear Sir,--During the night of the 23d, and morning of the 24th of May, 1864, Hancock's Second corps, Army of the Potomac, was crossing the trestle bridge over the North Anna at Chesterfield, and during that time, more especially after dawn, whenever any considerable number of troops appeared on the bridge, they were the object of immediate attention from a Confederate battery a few hundred yards up the river, in position on the right ban
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sherman's advance on Meridian — report of General W. H. Jackson. (search)
onnoitre the enemy's position, and feel of him in force, and, if the opportunity should appear favorable, to capture the city and works. At 10 o'clock, A. M., we commenced the attack. Colonel Mabry was ordered to attack on the Plank road; Colonel Jones to carry the left central redoubt; Colonel Hawkins to carry the extreme right redoubt. These officers belonged to General Ross's brigade, and their dispositions were made by him. Acting under General Ross's advice, I placed Captain Thralltention. We had now four pieces throwing shells at this work. One of my pieces, however, soon disabled itself by its recoil. I received a message from General Ross, saying that he had thrown the forces of his wing, to-wit: Colonel Mabry's, Colonel Jones's, and the Twelfth Tennessee cavalry, Colonel Neeley commanding, around the east and south sides of the fort, and the shells which went over the works fell among our own men. I now saw that I could complete the investment of the work, and sto
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia. by J. Wm. Jones. Paper no. 3.--down the Valley after Stonewall's quarter-master. I pass by the scenes of our winter quarters at Manassas, and of the falling back from that line of defence; for although there are many points of interest connected with these events, I can only in these papers touch on a few of the more important movements of our army. Ewell's division held the line of the Rappahannock, while Johnston fell back to Richmond, and went thence to the Peninsula to support Magruder in the skillful and gallant resistance he had been making to the advance of the overwhelming force of the enemy. The situation at this time was anything but encouraging. The Confederates after the battle of Manassas, had been beguiled into the idea that the war was virtually over — that foreign powers would certainly recognize the the Confederacy, and that it was scarcely necessary to make much preparation for another campaign. I remembe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
ence at Lewinsville we quoted from a version we had at the time of its occurrence, but we are very much gratified to receive from our friend, Major McClellan, the following exact copy of the original: Lexington, Ky., 12th April, 1881. Rev. J. Wm. Jones: My Dear Sir,--In your interesting Reminiscences, published in the last No. of the Southern Historical Society Papers, you make mention of some correspondence which passed between General Stuart and some of his old army comrades about tinks the location was south of the Old Church road; but there are so many references to Shady Grove and Shady Grove road that others think the position was north of Old Church road, nearer the Shady Grove. If possible I would like to ascertain the distance, also, from Bethesda church, and the bearing by compass. If you can without much trouble assist me in determining this point, you will confer a great favor upon Yours, very truly, Wm. H. Hodgkin. Rev. J. Wm. Jones, D. D., Richmond, Va.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia. by J. Wm. Jones. Paper no. 4.--capture of Winchester and rout of Banks's army. We were now on the flank, and would soon be in the rear of General Banks, whose army numbered about 18,000, while ours numbered about 16,000. But he was equally on our flank, and could, by a bold movement on Front Royal, have recaptured his stores and prisoners, and planted himself in our rear. Whether this would have been a wise thing for him to do is another question, and he does not seem to have long hesitated as to entering the lists (as he expresses it in his report) for a race to the Potomac. General Ewell, with Trimble's brigade and some cavalry, was sent on the morning of Saturday, May 24th, by the direct road to Winchester, while Jackson moved his main body across to Middletown, on the main Valley pike. Coming in sight of Middletown, Jackson saw that the pike was filled with a rapidly retreating column, and immediately he ordered Captain
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia. By J. William Jones. Paper no. 5. How Fremont and Shields caught Stonewall Jackson. The day after the capture of Winchester we spent in resting on the green sward and reveling in the stores which we had captured from General Banks, and the large number of sutlers who had brought to Winchester supplies of every description. It was very amusing to see the relish with which our boys would discard beef and hardtack and feast on potted meats, pickled oysters, lobsters, genuine coffee, bakers' bread, ham, canned fruits, oranges, figs, all kinds of confectionery, and various other luxuries to which, even at that date, the Confederacy was a stranger. Clothing of every pattern was abundant, and was eagerly seized on by the ragged rebels until their regulation gray was fast disappearing and blue uniforms becoming the prevailing fashion. Old Jack soon put a stop to this transformation, however, by issuing an order to his provost guard to
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