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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 131 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 72 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 50 22 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 48 8 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 46 14 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 37 15 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 32 8 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for J. William Jones or search for J. William Jones in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
two regiments of Colquitt's brigades, with about twenty field pieces, under Colonel Jones. At day-break, you will march to Port Walthall Junction, and when you hearrthy comrade in the saddle of Stuart and of Hampton, and the good deeds of J. William Jones, the Chaplain of The Boys in Gray, whose life-work will perpetuate on the ellorsville from Stuart and Jackson. Lexington, Ky., January 27, 1883. Rev. J. Wm. Jones, Richmond, Va.: My Dear Sir,—Mrs. Thos. R. Price, of Richmond, Va., haodgkins, sends us the following note: Macon, Ga., November 17th, 1882. Rev. J. Wm. Jones, Secretary Southern Historical Society, Richmond, Va.. My Dear Sir,—Inga. By General W. T. Martin. Natchez, Miss., Feb'y 3rd, 1883. Rev. J. William Jones, D. D., Secretary Southern Historical Society.: Dear Sir,—It has seemed . The State of Texas. Governor Ireland. 3. Southern Historical Society. Rev. J. Wm. Jones. 4. Army of Northern Virginia. Colonel J. W. Robertson. 5. The Brave Bo<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraph. (search)
o fight over again, before the forum of the world's judgment, the great war of secession and independence. In that contest the Southern mind and the Southern tongue and pen will not be less brilliant but more successful than than the Southern heart and the Southern sword. Let us do what we can to help this great purpose and end. Fellow citizens and guests, I offer you the name and fame of Fitzhugh Lee, the worthy comrade in the saddle of Stuart and of Hampton, and the good deeds of J. William Jones, the Chaplain of The Boys in Gray, whose life-work will perpetuate on the enduring page the memory of our heroes living and dead. Our printers report our space all filled, and we must reluctantly leave out what we had to say of Augusta, Athens, Rome, and Greenville, S. C., at all of which places we met a cordial greeting, and were placed under high obligations for courtesies freely extended. But we must say, that Colonel C. C. Jones, Jr., and the committee in Augusta—Dr. Newton,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
Notes and Queries. Field Notes at Chancellorsville from Stuart and Jackson. Lexington, Ky., January 27, 1883. Rev. J. Wm. Jones, Richmond, Va.: My Dear Sir,—Mrs. Thos. R. Price, of Richmond, Va., has recently submitted to my perusal some letters and papers left by her son, Major R. Channing Price, General Stuart's Adjutant-General, who was killed in battle near Chancellorsville, on 1st May, 1863. Among these I find one of the last field dispatches written by Stonewall Jackson. Gary upon the lives of these two great men! Yours very truly, H. B. Mcclellan. The Macon Light Artillery at Fredericksburg. Our gallant friend, Major N. M. Hodgkins, sends us the following note: Macon, Ga., November 17th, 1882. Rev. J. Wm. Jones, Secretary Southern Historical Society, Richmond, Va.. My Dear Sir,—In your last (October and November), General E. P. Alexander, in his admirable paper (No. 2) relative to the battle of Fredericksburg, says: Their advance exposed the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A defence of General Bragg's conduct at Chickamauga. (search)
A defence of General Bragg's conduct at Chickamauga. By General W. T. Martin. Natchez, Miss., Feb'y 3rd, 1883. Rev. J. William Jones, D. D., Secretary Southern Historical Society.: Dear Sir,—It has seemed to me that more misrepresentation, intentional or otherwise, in regard to his acts and motives, during the late war, fell to the lot of General Bragg than any other prominent Confederate officer. That he was unselfish, patriotic, and devoted to our cause, few who knew him will doubt. He has been very severely criticised for failing, it is said, to avail himself of opportunities afforded him by the enemy just previous to and during the battle of Chicamauga. There are many living officers and men who know how little of blame should have attached to him for Hindman's palpable disobedience of order in McLemore's Cove, and General Polk's failure to attack Crittenden's corps in its isolated position, immediately after Hindman's fiasco. The September No. 1881, of the South
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
when they would burst out into enthusiastic applause. Then followed a magnificent banquet, over which Governor Ireland gracefully presided. We regret that our space does not allow us to give a full report of the speeches made—many of which were of a high order of merit—but we can only give the regular toasts and the names of the respondents: The first toast was Our Guests. Responded to by General Lee. 2. The State of Texas. Governor Ireland. 3. Southern Historical Society. Rev. J. Wm. Jones. 4. Army of Northern Virginia. Colonel J. W. Robertson. 5. The Brave Boys in Blue—Our Foes in War—Our Friends in Peace. General G. W. Russ. 6. Army of Tennessee. General G. D. Johnston. 7. The Chief Executive of the Storm-cradled Nation that fell—who has proven true to his Principles and his People in War and in Peace, in Prosperity and Adversity-Jefferson Davis. Governor F. R. Lubbock. 8. The Matchless Soldier, the Knightly Gentleman, Grand in War, Great in Peace—Robert Ed
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Nathan Hale of ArkansasDavid O. Dodd. (search)
The Nathan Hale of Arkansas—David O. Dodd. By Prof. W. C. Parham. Benton, ark., May 26TH, 1883. Rev. Dr. J. Wm. Jones, Secretary Southern Historical Society. My Dear Sir,—I enjoyed the great pleasure of hearing General Fitzhugh Lee's graphic description of the Battle of Chancellorsville, in Little Rock, last winter. In the felicitous prefatory remarks made by yourself, I was particularly struck with one terse sentence; Let those who made the history tell it as it was. In this connection you distinctly expressed it as the desire of the Society, to receive contributions from any source, particularly from Confederate sources, giving information bearing either upon the general conduct of the War between the States, or even upon well authenticated incidents of a personal nature, in that great struggle. In reply to that request, publicly expressed, I propose to give you an account of a tragical incident which occurred in the Trans-Mississippi Department, during the winter of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of Valentine's Recumbent figure of Lee at Lexington, Va., June 28th, 1883. (search)
er of wisdom— unerring judgment combined with exquisite taste. The literature that may be found in the letters of the great, unfolds the very essence of the genius of the men, and of the times they lived in; and in my humble judgment it were sufficient to read the letters written by General Lee, and which are collated in the beautiful memorial volume Personal Reminiscences, Anecdotes and Letters of General R. E. Lee, by J Wm. Jones, Secretary Southern Historical Society. prepared by Rev. Dr. J. Wm. Jones, to discern that the writer was one who profoundly comprehended the topics of the day, and wielded a pen as vigorous and polished as his sword. And when we contemplate in connection with his deeds, the fair and lofty character that is mirrored in them, we behold one whose strong, equitable and wide-reaching mind was such that had he devoted it to jurisprudence, had made the name of Justice as venerable and august as when a Marshall enunciated the law; who, had he been a statesman,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of the Lee Memorial Association. (search)
n A. Graham, of the old Rockbridge Artillery, presided, and Rev. J. William Jones was made Secretary. After making some arrangements in reommander, a committee, consisting of Major J. B. Dorman and Rev. J. William Jones, was appointed to present suitable resolutions to an adjourlter Bowie, General John Echols, Colonel T. S. Flournoy, Rev. J. William Jones, D. D., Colonel J. K. Edmundson. When the great Lee Memorialpondence: Richmond College, Virginia, March 30th, 1875. Rev. J. Wm. Jones, D. D.: Dear Sir,—We have been appointed by the Literary Socieowing resolutions were adopted: Resolved, 1. That Messrs. Dr. J. William Jones and E. V. Valentine be requested by the Lee Memorial Associasolved, 2. That the Lee Memorial Association, having heard from Rev. Dr. Jones that the students of Richmond College will make an application miniscence, anecdotes and letters of General R. E. Lee, by J. William Jones, D. D. Roll of Liberty-Hall Volunteers. Photographs of Gene
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The friendship between Lee and Scott. (search)
The friendship between Lee and Scott. By J. Wm. Jones. Now that the bitter memories of the late war between the States are passing away, and those who were enemies once can meet as friends and brothers again, it is very pleasant to recall the fact that even amid the animosities of war there were instances of warm friendship existing between soldiers of the opposing armies. That playful correspondence between Jeb Stuart and his old West Point chum at Lewinsville, in 1861, the capture of his old classmate by Fitz. Lee in 1862, and the jolly time they had together as they sang Benny Havens O! and revived memories of Auld Lang Syne—the meeting between Major Bob Wheat and Colonel Percy Wyndham, when the latter was captured by Ashby near Harrisonburg, Va., in 1862, and many similar incidents, might be given to show that there were friendships which could not be broken by the fact that honest men took opposite sides in the war. But one of the most conspicuous illustrations is the wa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
It is worthy, as far as any publication can be, of the event it commemorates, and we congratulate our friend, the Rev. J. William Jones, on the impression his Magazine has made. It gives, as its name indicates, a graphic account of the unveiling stic oration by Major John W. Daniel, and a paper full of interest by the editor, the Rev. [ex-Confederate chaplain] J. William Jones. Take the publication, all in all, it is one which should be bound in snow-white vellum, with clasps of gold. Thcription to Southern Historical Papers is only $3, and only 50 cents for the Lee number. Orders should be sent to Dr. J. William Jones, Secretary, Richmond, Va. Dr. Jones deserves the gratitude of the Southern people for the energy the ardor and Dr. Jones deserves the gratitude of the Southern people for the energy the ardor and the ability with which he has worked and is working to give to the world, through Southern Historical Papers, a true history of the South in the course of her ill-omened cause. Louisiana soldiers' home.—as a model for similar organizations, we g
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