hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 63 11 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 54 20 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 32 8 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 31 21 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 8 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 19 17 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 15 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for John William Jones or search for John William Jones in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Treatment and exchange of prisoners. (search)
y answered by a counter report of a committee of the Confederate Congress. And it is also true that in 1876, the Rev. John Wm. Jones, D. D., who was then editing the Southern Historical Society Papers, made a full and masterly investigation and repong the South and its leaders from these aspersions (for which work, as said in our last report, the Southern people owe Dr. Jones a lasting debt of gratitude.) (The letter of Mr. Davis, the report of the Committee of the Confederate Congress, with other valuable material collected by Dr. Jones, are all published in the first volume of the Southern Historical Papers, and also in a separate volume.) But whilst these publications were most satisfactory to us at the time, they, necessarily, did nomisery contained in many of the personal recitals of the captives on either side, such as are collected in the works of Dr. Jones, the Sanitary Commission, and others. Many of these are simply heart-sickening and disgusting; and, making allowances
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Refused to burn it. [from the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, April 27, 1902.] (search)
for disobedience, or rather defiance, of the orders of Brigadier-General Johnson, but the arrest was broken the same day, and he was returned to the command of his regiment while covering the retreat of the command when pressed by two brigades of Federal Cavalry. It is proper to state that in this affair General McCausland was acting under orders received from General Early. White, in his History of General Robert E. Lee, alluded to the foregoing incident, and is also recited in John William Jones' History of the United States. During the retreat from the invasion of Pennsylvania referred to McCausland's command reached Moorefield, in Hardy county, and encamped there on the 6th of August. Man of iron resolution. The Confederate Military History says: The lines were made, the camps pitched, and the pickets posted according to the orders of Brigadier-General McCausland, the commanding officer of the expedition, Brigadier-General Johnson obeying his orders. Next mor
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.30 (search)
officers. While Colonel Strange, of Charlottesville, Va., was drilling his regiment in that town a short time before being ordered to the front, he said: Mr. Jones, stand square, sir! Mr. Jones immediately replied: Colonel Strange, I are squar, sir! Mr. Jones was a splendid specimen of the mountaineer, and of Mr. Jones immediately replied: Colonel Strange, I are squar, sir! Mr. Jones was a splendid specimen of the mountaineer, and of such material as many of the best Confederate soldiers were made. Yes, we whipped them badly at Manassas, sometimes called the battle of Bull Run by the skedaddlers, for it was the battle of Manassas that gave to the English language the new word skedaddle. So much has been written about this battle that I will not attempt any Mr. Jones was a splendid specimen of the mountaineer, and of such material as many of the best Confederate soldiers were made. Yes, we whipped them badly at Manassas, sometimes called the battle of Bull Run by the skedaddlers, for it was the battle of Manassas that gave to the English language the new word skedaddle. So much has been written about this battle that I will not attempt any special description of the disposition of the troops or their manoeuvres, but give you extracts from papers and reports from men who were engaged in the battle, that these facts may be before the eyes of our citizens, and not reply, as did a young lady to a friend of mine a few weeks ago in Philadelphia, when asked some question ab