hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 36 8 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 27 13 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 17 3 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 12 4 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 11 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 11 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 3 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Sam Jones or search for Sam Jones in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.23 (search)
and I knew the Major was a strict disciplinarian and would do as he said. So I asked him: How can I help it? Go to Captain Jones (I. L., of Liberty Hill), and say to him what I said to you, and that I say you can only relieve yourself of responsi the first premature shot he permits to come from that fort. I so did; crossing the railroad among the shells to see Captain Jones. That discipline was the secret of that slaughter. The battle was continuously fought under the strictest tacticsie-balls. At my post, behind the breastwork, near the railroad, I would peep up to see how near the Federals were. Captain Jones, on the other side of the railroad, was doing the same thing. Closer and closer would the Federals come, and I wouldr straightened himself, Rear rank, ready! aim, fire! Then, Front rank, ready! aim, fire! I extended the orders to Captain Jones, and 250 Enfield rifles of each rank spoke at each command with one voice. The air was thick in front of us with the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A horror of the war. [from the Richmond, Va., times, March 14, 1897.] (search)
A horror of the war. [from the Richmond, Va., times, March 14, 1897.] How General Custer hung some of Mosby's men. Their comrades wished to raise a monument to the memory of Anderson, love, Carter, Jones, Overby and Rhodes. When Mosby's men met here at the last Confederate Reunion, and feasted and talked of the thrilling events of their lives on the frontier, they did not fail to recall the names of those who had fallen in the fight, but especially the six soldiers, who, after bein Very respectfully, your obedient servant, John S. Mosby, Lieutenant-Colonel. We, the committee appointed by Mosby Camp to solicit subscriptions to erect a monument at Front Royal, Va., to the memory of our six comrades—Anderson, Carter, Jones, Overby, Love and Rhodes—who, while prisoners of war, were hung or shot to death, by the order of General Custer, in the year 1864. The memory of these brave boys, who met an untimely death in defence of their country, deserves to be perpetuat
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.38 (search)
ne of the bravest and most promising spirits in the South. He had led the Georgia regiment, which had fought with the 4th Alabama like tigers in the strife. General Berrien, a brother-in-law of Dr. Semmes; Mr. and Mrs. Semmes, the doctor, General Sam Jones and Staff, all went out to Manassas early in the morning to see the shaft erected. For some reason or other it was impossible for Mr. Davis, who had been expected to be the orator of the day, to be present. At the last moment the Georgia regiment and General Sam Jones called upon Mr. Semmes to be the orator of the occasion. He was so totally taken by surprise, said Mrs. Semmes, that he came up to me and whispered, I really don't know what to say on such short notice. Yes you do, I replied, just tell them about the bravery and heroism of our Southern boys; tell them how they are suffering and how they still cling to the cause which is so dear to us all. And he did, said Mrs. Semmes. I think that it was the grandest speech
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.43 (search)
located on Morris Island could send their shells into the lower part of the city, where their explosion caused great destruction of houses, and danger to the inhabitants of that part of the town. As a means of protecting the residents, Major-General Sam Jones, commanding the Confederate forces in Charleston, notified Major-General J. G. Foster, of the United States army, that he had placed five generals and forty-five field officers of the United States army, in a part of the city occupied byer sent a copy of the letter to General Halleck, at Washington, and thereupon he ordered 600 Confederate officers to be taken from Fort Delaware and placed on Morris Island under the fire of the Confederate guns, in retaliation for the act of General Jones. Of these 600 officers, a list of the Virginians is given herewith, among whom will be found the name of Second Lieutenant C. F. Crisp, 10th Infantry, Luray, Page county. This second lieutenant was the late Speaker of the House of Repres