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ness as an officer, and for gallantry in the battles before Atlanta. Colonel Theodore Jones, Thirtieth Ohio volunteer infantry, for faithful service during previoudirected, and the consequence was, that two regiments — the Eighth Indiana (Colonel Jones) and Ninth Michigan cavalry (Colonel Acker)--together with myself and staffall force of the enemy was encountered and dispersed by the Eighth Indiana (Colonel Jones) and the Fifth Kentucky, (Colonel Baldwin,) nine miles from Waynesboro, notvance, was directed to make a disposition accordingly. The Eighth Indiana (Colonel Jones) was dismounted and pushed forward as skirmishers; the Ninth Pennsylvania, avalry, at East-Macon; Colonel Acker and his regiment, Ninth Michigan ; and Colonel Jones, Eighth Indiana, when cut off and surrounded near Waynesboro; Colonel Heathr-General J. W. Geary commanding. Three brigades, commanded by Colonels Pardee, Jones, and Barnum. Third division, Brigadier-General W. T. Ward commanding. Three
ire to our infantry. Accordingly, Colonel Atkins (Second brigade) was ordered to move out to the intersection of the Waynesboro and Louisville road, and there take up position. Colonel Murray was directed to move past Colonel Atkins, and take up position in his rear, and so on in succession retire from any force that might be sent in pursuit. By some misunderstanding, Colonel Atkins moved on without halting as directed, and the consequence was, that two regiments — the Eighth Indiana (Colonel Jones) and Ninth Michigan cavalry (Colonel Acker)--together with myself and staff, were cut off and partly surrounded. But the brave officers and men of these two regiments, by their splendid fighting, broke through the rebel lines and slowly fell back, repulsing every attack of the enemy, until the main column was reached. We moved on, crossed Buckhead Creek, burning the bridge, and halted to feed two (2) miles from the creek. Information soon reached me that Wheeler was crossing with hi
December 2. The command moved on the Waynesboro road, in advance of a division of infantry under General Baird, the object being to cover the movements of our troops, marching in several columns on Millen. A small force of the enemy was encountered and dispersed by the Eighth Indiana (Colonel Jones) and the Fifth Kentucky, (Colonel Baldwin,) nine miles from Waynesboro, not, however, without a severe skirmish. On reaching Rocky Creek, the enemy was found in considerable force on the opposite side. General Baird's infantry came up, and a force of both cavalry and infantry crossed the creek and simultaneously charged the enemy, who rapidly retreated toward Waynesboro and Augusta, being closely pursued for some distance by the cavalry.
valry, (Colonel Heath,) who had been sent out on our right, charged the enemy in flank and rear, when he gave way at all points, and rapidly fell back to the town of Waynesboro. Here he was found occupying a second line of barricades, with artillery, as before, and his flanks so far extended, that it was useless to attempt to turn them. I therefore determined to break his centre. Colonel Murray, having the advance, was directed to make a disposition accordingly. The Eighth Indiana (Colonel Jones) was dismounted and pushed forward as skirmishers; the Ninth Pennsylvania, (Colonel Jordon,) in columns of fours, by battalions, had the left; the Third Kentucky, (Lieutenant-Colonel King,) the centre; the Fifth Kentucky (Colonel Baldwin) and Second Kentucky, (Captain Foreman,) the right. The advance was sounded, and in less than twenty minutes the enemy was driven from his position, the town gained, and Wheeler's entire force completely routed. The Fifth Ohio, Fifth Kentucky, and a
my remarks, I desire to make favorable mention of my brigade commanders, Colonels Murray and Atkins. Both have, at all times, faithfully performed the responsible duties that have devolved upon them. Always on duty, attentive to orders, energetic, skilful, and brave. Both are educated gentlemen and accomplished cavalry soldiers; both merit promotion. Lieutenant-Colonel Sanderson and his regiment, Tenth Ohio cavalry, at East-Macon; Colonel Acker and his regiment, Ninth Michigan ; and Colonel Jones, Eighth Indiana, when cut off and surrounded near Waynesboro; Colonel Heath and his regiment, at Buckhead Creek. The Ninety-second Illinois mounted infantry, Lieutenant-Colonel Van Buskirk; the Ninth Pennsylvania, Colonel Jordon ; the Third Kentucky, Lieutenant-Colonel King; the Tenth Ohio, Fifth Ohio, and Ninth Michigan cavalry, at Waynesboro, December fourth, have all, at the various places mentioned, behaved most handsomely and attracted my special attention. The Second Kentucky c
was sent to destroy the railroad between Atlanta and the Chattahoochee River, which was reported the next morning as effectually done. Changes in the principal commands of the corps since the last campaign,. left the organization as follows: First division, Brigadier-General A. J. Jackson commanding. The brigades commanded respectively by Colonels Selfridge, Carman, and Robinson. Second division, Brigadier-General J. W. Geary commanding. Three brigades, commanded by Colonels Pardee, Jones, and Barnum. Third division, Brigadier-General W. T. Ward commanding. Three brigades, commanded by Colonels F. C. Smith, Dustin, and Ross. A list of regiments composing the brigades will be found in reports of subordinate commanders. The artillery was reduced to four batteries of four guns each; two of three-inch Rodmans, and two of twelve-pounder Napoleons, under charge of Major J. A. Reynolds, Chief of Artillery. The horses were increased to eight to a carriage. The Ninth Illi
gth of four thousand four hundred and twenty-six officers and men, and was composed of seventeen regimental organizations. Its three brigade commanders being, Colonels John M. Oliver, Fifteenth Michigan; Wells S. Jones, Fifty-third Ohio; and Theodore Jones, Thirtieth Ohio. The troops moved rapidly, passing through McDonough the seventeenth, Indian Springs the eighteenth, crossing the Ocmulgee the nineteenth, at Roach's Mills, reaching Hillsboro the twentieth, and Clinton the twenty-first, where Colonel Theodore Jones's brigade was left to cover the Macon roads till the next division arrived. Some skirmishing took place here, with a few casualties. On the twenty-second, the Macon and Augusta Railroad was crossed, and the march continued, passing Irwinton the twenty-fourth, and the Oconee River, at Bull's Ferry, the twenty-fifth. The enemy was found on the opposite bank, and two regiments deployed to develop them. On the morning of the twenty-sixth, they had left, and preparati