hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for W. A. Joplin or search for W. A. Joplin in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
ound the beautiful city, filled the day, and at night General Lee had a fine audience and a splendid reception. We saw enough of Little Rock to be charmed with the city, and to resolve to go there again at our very first opportunity. But at 12 we were off for Memphis, to reach which place we had, because of the overflow, to go by rail to Madison, and thence by steamer down the St. Francis and up the Mississippi. The trip would have been a very tedious one; but the courtesy of Captain W. A. Joplin, (an old Bedford, Virginia, Confederate,) and his polite officers of the steamer Rene Macready, made our time pass very pleasantly, and the sight of the Mississippi, forty miles wide at that point, was very interesting to us, though not so to the poor sufferers by the flood. Arriving at Memphis we were met at the boat by the committee, who were introduced by our friend, Colonel H. D. Capers, and were at once taken possession of so cordially that the salute fired in honor of General
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
ound the beautiful city, filled the day, and at night General Lee had a fine audience and a splendid reception. We saw enough of Little Rock to be charmed with the city, and to resolve to go there again at our very first opportunity. But at 12 we were off for Memphis, to reach which place we had, because of the overflow, to go by rail to Madison, and thence by steamer down the St. Francis and up the Mississippi. The trip would have been a very tedious one; but the courtesy of Captain W. A. Joplin, (an old Bedford, Virginia, Confederate,) and his polite officers of the steamer Rene Macready, made our time pass very pleasantly, and the sight of the Mississippi, forty miles wide at that point, was very interesting to us, though not so to the poor sufferers by the flood. Arriving at Memphis we were met at the boat by the committee, who were introduced by our friend, Colonel H. D. Capers, and were at once taken possession of so cordially that the salute fired in honor of General