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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 4 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 6, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 1 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Henry Jordan or search for Henry Jordan in all documents.

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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
States service, was born near his present home in 1835. His father, Uriah Jordan, was a native of South Carolina, a physician and farmer, and his grandfather, Henry Jordan, one of the early settlers of Landsford, was a native of Virginia. His mother, Margaret, was the daughter of Robert Robinson, a native of Ireland who settled in the Fishing Creek district and became a member of the legislature and county sheriff. Dr. Jordan was educated at the Mount Zion school and South Carolina college, and then entering upon the study of medicine, was graduated at the university of New York in 1859. He began the practice in his native county, but abandoned it in April, 1861, to enlist in Company A, Sixth volunteers, with which he served near Charleston. Mr. Jordan heard the first gun of the war, when it was fired upon Fort Sumter. In July at Summerville he re-enlisted in the Confederate States service, and reaching Manassas Junction as the great battle of 1861 came to a close, had the pl