hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

river; also another detachment several miles above, to destroy a large mill and the ferry-boats across the Apalachee. Both of these parties were successful; the railroad bridge, which was a fine structure about four hundred yards long and sixty feet high from the water, and was approached by several hundred yards of trestle-work at each end, was thoroughly destroyed. At Blue Spring I halted, and set my troops to work destroying railroad. Here, at night, encamped on the plantation of Colonel Lee Jordan, on which I found two hundred and eighty bales of cotton and fifty thousand bushels of corn stored for the rebel government. All the cotton and the most of the corn was destroyed. In addition to this, my command destroyed elsewhere during the day two hundred and fifty bales of cotton and several cotton-gins and mills. I also destroyed in all to-day about five miles of railroad and a large quantity of railroad-ties and string-timbers. November 20.--Moved at seven A. M.; the weathe
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 17: (search)
ed, but managed to hold his ground with the assistance of cavalry. On another part of the line of invasion the Federal Twentieth corps, opposed only by desultory skirmishing of small Confederate bands, had made a path of destruction through Madison and Eatonton. Geary's division destroyed the fine railroad bridge over the Oconee, and the mill and ferryboats near Buckhead. On the 19th he also destroyed about 500 bales of cotton and 50,000 bushels of corn, mostly on the plantation of Col. Lee Jordan. This corps entered Milledgeville on the 20th, and Davis' corps, accompanied by Sherman, arrived next day. The State legislature hastily adjourned, and under the direction of Gen. Ira R. Foster, quartermaster-general of the State, great efforts were made to remove the State property and archives, but on account of the scarcity of wagons and the demoralized condition of the people, adequate help could not be obtained. As the penitentiary had been used for the manufacture of arms, a