Browsing named entities in John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for George Jordan or search for George Jordan in all documents.

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ily increasing their number. School for officers is actively attended; battalion drill has its fixed days. The Louisiana Legion —with a past behind it—has returned to its old system of Sunday marches in order to make sure a full attendance. Among the new companies was one whose numbers were drawn from the greenroom. This company of twenty-four privates called itself the Varieties Volunteers. Actors of repute were the officers—John E. Owens, comedian of renown, being the captain, and George Jordan, handsomest of walking men, first-lieutenant. Nor shall Labor hold back for the convention. The Screwmen's benevolent association—sturdy workers along the levee, still populous with boats bringing cotton, rice and sugar—enjoys its annual parade. Business and confidence touch elbows. The 8th of January, representing that battle which has so strongly inspired the spirit of the soldier of Louisiana, is to be celebrated with a muster of the city's militia. Every historic city, lik
only surviving captain of that guard so famous in the past, and on either hand of Maunsel White Anthony Fernandez and M. M. Barnett, Sr., two of the oldest fighters of 1814-15, still hale and hearty. In front of the veterans could be noted their flag which Chalmette saw—or rather what remained of it—a bare pole with stripes of tattered silk. The white veterans were followed by their brethrenin-arms, the colored veterans of Chalmette. Jordan Noble, once drummer-boy at Chalmette—in 1861 old Jordan for the city and State—is among them. Upon these last the spectators gaze in that silence which, accorded to the worthy, is respect. They raise their hats as the latter pass. The parade of the troops on Washington's birthday was a triumph in the appearance and in the number of the men. The Picayune of the 23d placed the number at 8,000, observing in connection with the day: May the custom, now revived, of paying honor to the birthday of Washington, be one of everlasting observ