hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 11 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 2 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 2 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 24 results in 10 document sections:

Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 13.94 (search)
ders Mattabesett, Sassacus, Wyalusing, and Miami, together with the smaller vessels, Whitehead, Ceres, and Commodore Hull, steamed up Albemarle Sound to give battle. The Union force under Captain Melancton Smith in the action of May 5th, 1864, was: Double-enders: Mattabesett, Commander John C. Febiger; Sassacus, Lieutenant-Commander Francis A. Roe; Wyalusing, Lieutenant-Commander Walter W. Queen; Miami, Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Charles A. French. Ferryboat: Commodore Hull, Acting Master Francis Josselyn. Gun-boats: Whitehead. Acting Ensign G. W. Barrett; Ceres, Acting Master H. H. Foster. The losses were: Mattabesett, k, 2; w, 6,--total, 8; Sassacus, k, 1; w, 19 (13 of these were scalded),--total, 20; Wyalusing, k, 1,--in all 29.--editors. The Sassacus was one of the several wooden side-wheel ships, known as double-enders, built for speed, light draught, and ease of manoeuvre. She carried four 9-inch Dahlgren guns and two 100-pounder Parrott rifles, and was under the comm
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 13.95 (search)
abandoned their works. In a short time Plymouth was entirely in possession of the Union forces. The casualties on the Union side were six killed and nine wounded. The vessels engaged were as follows: Doubleenders: Shamrock, Commander W. H. Macomb, commanding division, Lieutenant Rufus K. Duer, executive officer; Otsego, Lieutenant-Commander H. N. T. Arnold; Wyalusing, Lieutenant-Commander Earl English; Tacony, Lieutenant-Commander W. T. Truxtun. Ferry-boat: Commodore Hull, Acting Master Francis Josselyn. Gun-boat: Whitehead, Acting Master G. W. Barrett. Tugs: Belle, Acting Master James G. Green; Bazley, Acting Master Mark D. Ames. The Chicopee, Commander A. D. Harrell, and Valley City, Acting Master J. A. J. Brooks, were not present at the second and final demonstration.--J. R. Soley. Note on the destruction of the Albemarle. by her Captain, A. F. Warley, C. S. N. When I took command of the Confederate States iron-clad Albemarle I found her made fast to the river ban
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 35: operations of the North Atlantic Squadron, 1863. (search)
nded for faithful and efficient service, and were promoted in consequence. Acting-Ensign De Camarra, Acting-Master's Mates E. MacKeever, A. H. Hicks and Edward S. Austin were commended for their good conduct and bravery in battle. Acting-Master F. Josselyn, Acting-Ensigns J. O. Johnson and J. B. De Camarra, Acting-Master's Mates A. F. Haraden and Henry W. Wells. Acting-Second-Assistant Engineers H. Rafferty and John E. Harper, and Paymaster's Steward John C. Cross, were recommended to esting-Master's Mates, M. E. Wandell and Wm. Chandler; Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistant, Cornelius Carr; Acting-Third-Assistants, G. R. Dunkley, Wm. Veitch and John Heaney. Steamer Commodore Hull. Acting-Masters, Wm. G. Saltonstall and Francis Josselyn; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, C. F. P. Hildreth; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, Jonathan Chapman; Acting-Ensigns, J. O. Johnson and J. B. da Camera; Acting-Master's Mates, E. F. Bowen, J. H. Wilkinson and A. F. Haradon; Engineers: Acting-Second-As
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 40: (search)
Carolina. The following vessels, arranged in the order given, off Edenton Bay, were under Captain Smith's command: Miami, Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant Charles A. French. Ceres, Acting-Master H. H. Foster. Commodore Hull, Act.-Master Francis Josselyn. Seymour. Second line. Mattabesett, Commander J. G. Febiger. Sassacus, Lieutenant-Commander F. A. Roe. Wyalusing, Lieutenant-Commander W. W. Queen. Whitehead, Acting-Ensign G. W. Barrett. The Miami was fitted with a torpedoant Surgeon, James Kinnier; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, Thos. Jernegan; Engineers: Acting-Second--Assistant, Hiram Warner; Acting-Third-Assistants, Charles Culver, D. S. Leffer and F. G. Shannon. Steamer Commodore Hull. Acting-Masters, Francis Josselyn and J. O. Johnson; Acting-Master's Mates, D. A. Simmond and Geo. Van Duzer; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, C. F. T. Hildreth; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, Jonathan Chapman; Engineer: Acting-Second-Assistant, B. F. Bee; Acting Third-Assistants, W.
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 49: first attack on Fort Fisher.--destruction of the confederate ram Albemarle, etc. (search)
ting-Ensign M. D. Ames, having on board the pilot of the Wyalusing; next came the Otsego, Lieutenant-Commander H. N. T. Arnold; Wyalusing, Lieutenant-Commander Earl English; Tacony, Lieutenant-Commander Wm. T. Truxtun; Commodore Hull, Acting-Master Francis Josselyn, in the order named. Owing to the skill of the pilot, Acting-Master Alfred Everett, the vessels. with a great deal of hard work, succeeded in entering Roanoke River at 4 P. M., with the exception of the Commodore Hull, which remainee Confederacy; but the sudden dash of the steamers disconcerted their aim, and the grape, canister, and shrapnel falling in their ranks from the distance of only a few yards were too much for human nature to resist. The Commodore Hull, Acting-Master Josselyn, was very much cut up by the enemy's shot, and lost four men killed and three wounded. She was exposed to the fire of the enemy's heavy guns, and, as she neared the batteries, a heavy fire of musketry was poured in from the rifle-pits. A
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 50: Second attack on Fort Fisher. (search)
Acting-Third-Assistants, T. K. Payson, C. W. Williams and J. D. Averill. Western world--Fourth-rate. Acting-Master, Edward Herrick; Acting-Ensigns, A. J. L. Barker, Chas. Hall, R. D. Sparrow and E. H. McDonald; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, R. F. Brooks, Acting-Assistant Paymaster, Amos D. Allen; Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistant, F. R. Shoemaker; Acting-Third-Assistants, A. Anderson, H. L. Perrine, J. E. Thumbert and Edw. G. Schwartz. Commodore Hull--Fourth-rate. Acting-Masters, F. Josselyn and J. O. Johnson; Acting-Ensign, F. J. Runnells; Acting-Master's Mate, Henry Fleet; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, J. Chapman; Engineers: Acting-Third-Assistants. O. L. Smith, W. C. Remick and S. T. Hand. Rachael Seaman--Fourth-rate. Acting-Master, Samuel Curtis; Acting-Ensigns, E. T. Strong and D. Organ; Acting-Master's Mates, H. B. Arbecam and W. H. Wording; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, T. Thompson. Whitehead--Fourth-rate. Acting-Master, Geo. W. Barrett; Acting-Ensign, Jarvis
H. H. Stewart, Chief Engineer, United States Navy. Lieut.-Com. W. W. Queen, U. S. N., Commanding. Report of Acting Master Josselyn. United States steamer Commodore Hull, off Roanoke River, N. C., May 6, 1864. Sir: I have the honor to reo casualties to report. Enclosed is a list of ammunition expended. I am, respectfully, your obedient servant, Francis Josselyn, Acting Master, commanding. Captain Melancton Smith, U. S. N., Senior Officer, Sounds of North Carolina. Additional report of Acting Master Josselyn. United States steamer Commodore Hull, off Roanoke River, N. C., May 6, 1864. Report of ammunition expended during engagement of May fifth: Thirty-pounder Parrott shell, sixty, (60.) Twenty-four-pounder howitzer shell, twenty-one, (21.) Respectfully submitted, F. Josselyn, Acting Master, commanding. Captain Melancton Smith, U. S. N., Senior Officer, Sounds of North Carolina. Report of Lieut. Charles A. French. United States steamer
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: reduction of Newbern—the Albemarle. (search)
officer of the Whitehead states: The rebel steamer Cotton Plant, with a number of launches in tow, having succeeded in making her escape, my attention was directed to the ram, upon which I opened fire with the 100-pounder rifle, using solid shot, first at a distance of one thousand, but soon lessened it to four hundred yards. No other mention is made of tile Cotton Plant having launches in tow, or of that vessel, except by the Miami, when on picket duty, that the Cotton Plant came out. Josselyn, commanding the Hull, reported his part in the engagement, and states that the Hull crossed the bows of the Albemarle and paid out a large seine for the purpose of fouling her propeller, but though encompassing the ram, it did not have the desired effect. The batteries, expenditures of ammunition, and casualties of the different vessels engaged will be found in the Appendix. No accounts whatever are found among the Confederate archives in Washington of this engagement, of injuries sus
expended 37 solid shot, 33 shell; 2 24-ponnder howitzers, expended 27 shrapnel, 18 shell; 2 12-pounder howitzers (one rifled). Casualties, 1 killed. Miami, Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Charles A. French. Battery: 1100-pounder Parrott rifle, expended 41 solid shot; 6 Ix-inch Dahlgrens, expended 76 solid shot; 1 24-ponnder howitzer. Whitehead, Acting Ensign G. W. Barrett. Battery: 1100-pounder Parrott rifle, expended 17 solid shot; 8 24-pounder howitzers. Commodore Hull, Acting Master Francis Josselyn. Battery: 230-pounder Parott rifles, expended 60 shell; 4 24-pounder howitzers, expended 24 shell. Ceres, Acting Master H. H. Foster. Battery: 2 20 pounder Parrott rifles (pivot). XI.—List of Ordnance left on Morris Island on the night of its evacuation, September 6, 1863. Battery Wagner. Two X-inch Columbiads (1 dismounted and broken, 1 serviceable); 1 X-inch mortar, serviceable; 2 Viii-inch shell guns (1 serviceable, 1 injured by shell and carriage disabled); 2 V
Iroquois, the, U. S. vessel, 7 Irwin, Lieutenant, 43; commended, 62 Isaac Smith, the, U. S. vessel, 17, 19, 21, 26, 37, 46, 49 et seq., 52, 72 et seq., 130 Ives, Captain T. P., 179 J. Jacksonville, Fla., 60 et seq. James Adger, the, 84 Jeffers, Lieutenant-Commanding William N., 177, 186 John Adams, the, U. S. sloop, 7 Johnson, Ensign M. L., conduct commended, 62; again commended, 102 Johnson, Neils, 69 Jones, Ensign, 200, 211 Jordan, Thomas, 78 Josselyn, of the Commodore Hull, 210 Judah, the, Confederate privateer, 69 Juniata, the, 156, 222, 228 K. Kansas, the, 210, 228 Kempff, Acting Master, 43 Keokuk, the, 90 et seq., 99 et seq., 116 Keystone State, the, U. S. vessel, 75, 80 et seq. Kitchen, Paymaster, 58 L. Lamb, Colonel, William, 226, 237, et seq., 240 Lamson, Lieutenant, 220, 237 Lancer, the, 179 Lardner, Captain J. L., 16, 21 Lamed, Lieutenant, 165 Latham, Captain, 198 Leckler, Col