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The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 7. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 8 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Josselyn, John 1638- (search)
Josselyn, John 1638- Author; born in England early in the seventeenth century; travelled in America in 1638-39 and 1663-71. He is the author of New England's rarities discovered; An account of two voyages to New England, etc.
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 18: Prescott and Motley (search)
ed at last. But the great light was a pleasant thing. doggerel, shows that even the Puritans could smile as they regarded some of their discomforts. Nathaniel Ward See also Book I, Chap. III. wrote The simple Cobler of Aggawam in America (1647), which Moses Coit Tyler called the most eccentric and amusing book that was produced in America during the colonial period, although Ward insisted that it should be accepted as a trustworthy account of the spiritual state of New England. John Josselyn, who wrote New England's Rareties (1672), declared that most of what he wrote was true; he admits that some things which he recorded he had heard but not seen: for example, that Indians commonly carry on their discussions in perfect hexameter verse, extempore, and that in New England there is a species of frog which chirps in the spring like swallows and croaks like toads in autumn, some of which when they sit upon their breech are a foot high, while up in the country they are as big as
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
burg, 284 John Endicott, 39 John of Barneveld, 145, 146 John Phoenix. See Derby, G. H. Johns Hopkins University, 338 Johnson, Andrew, 143, 144, 151, 157 Johnson, Judge S. E., 264 Johnson, Dr., Samuel, 38, 94, 124, 203, 234, 239, 367 Johnston, Albert Sidney, 306 Joseph E., 306 Joseph E., Richard Malcolm, 316, 318, 320, 347, 365, 379, 389 Jonas books, 400 Jonathan to John, 280 Jones, Charles Colcock, Jr., 316-318, 322 Josh Billings. See Shaw, H. W. Josselyn, John, 149 Journal (N. Y.), 178 Journal (Louisville), 281 Journal of American Folk-Lore, 356 n. Journal of an African Cruiser, 21 Journal of a solitary man, the, 19 Journal of commerce, 187 J. R. S. (pseud. for Whitman), 262 n. Judas MacCABAEUSabaeus, 37, 39 Jumping frog of Calaveras County, 379 Junta, The, 183 Just before the battle, mother, 285 Justice and Expediency, 52 Juvenile miscellany, 399 Kaler, James Otis, 405 Kansas Emigrants, the, 51 Kant, 1
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 7. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Zzz Missing head (search)
has the universal acclimation of sin. The first account we have of negro slaves in New England is from the pen of John Josselyn. Nineteen years after the landing at Plymouth, this interesting traveller was for some time the guest of Samuel Mavel new-comers gratis. On the 2d of October, 1639, about nine o'clock in the morning, Mr. Maverick's negro woman, says Josselyn, came to my chamber, and in her own country language and tune sang very loud and shrill. Going out to her, she used a gntroduction and purchase, giving freedom to all held to service at the close of seven years. In 1641, two years after Josselyn's adventure on Noddle's Island, the code of laws known by the name of the Body of Liberties was adopted by the Colony. gain took the place of the severe self-denial and rigid virtues of the fathers. Hence we are not surprised to find that Josselyn, in his second visit to New England, some twenty-five years after his first, speaks of the great increase of servants an