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be communicated by a leather band over a pulley fixed on the axle of the fly-wheel, or by means of a spur-wheel and pinion. The steam is admitted through the hollow axle on one side, and withdrawn through a similar hollow axle at the opposite side of the cylinder. The figure gives side and front elevations, respectively. The top works are supported by a fourcolumn frame. Oscillating-cylinder steam-engine. Fig. 3431 is another form of oscillating-cylinder steam — engine, known as Joyce's pendulous highpressure engine. The cylinder is inverted and oscillates on its trunnions after the manner of a pendulum. The piston-rod is connected directly to the crank. See also oscillating-piston steam-engine. Fig. 3432 is a transverse view of a low-draft river steamboat with a pair of oscillating engines and feath- ering paddle-wheels. Fig. 3433 is a side view, showing one cylinder inclined, and the upper portion of the wheel with its floats in their changeable positions. The
of a screw-press. The face of the mold being afterward black-leaded, an electrotype cast was taken. He also made stereotype-plates from the same substance, the mold being obtained in the above manner, and the plate formed under pressure while heated. Stereotype-mold drying-press (paper process). Iron electrotypes were made by Klein, a Russian, and the process patented in the United States, September 29, 1868. See also Scientific American, November 18 and November 27, 1868. In Joyce's process for obtaining plates in relief from intaglio molds, patented July 14, 1874, a smooth plate of iron, such as is used in the clay process of stereotyping, is covered with a thin layer of suitable composition, ordinary thin clay and pulverized plaster. When dry, the design or writing is cut into the composition by means of pointed or sharp-edged graving-tools, so as to expose the face of the plate at those parts which are to show black in the print. The nature of the material enable
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Missouri Volunteers. (search)
aris March 11. Battle of Shiloh April 6-7. Paris April 10. Advance on and siege of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. Expedition to Ripley June 27-July 1. At Camp Clear Creek till August 15. Assigned to 1st Missouri Light Artillery as Battery I, August, 1862. For further service see that Battery. Graessele's Battery Independent Lt. Artillery See Knispel's Battery. Johnson's State Militia Battery Light Artillery Attached to 1st Missouri State Militia Cavalry. Joyce's Battery Light Artillery Attached to 10th Missouri Cavalry. Knispel's Battery Light Artillery Attached to 4th Missouri Cavalry. Kowald's Battery Light Artillery Organized August, 1861, but failed to complete organization. Mustered out December 14, 1861. Battery lost 1 killed and 2 by disease. Total 3. Landgraerer's Battery Horse Artillery Organized at St. Louis, Mo., October 8, 1861. Attached to Dept. of Missouri to January, 1862. 5th Brigade, Army of South
L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion, Part 2: daring enterprises of officers and men. (search)
ited States uniform, but little suspicion could be excited, even if the fugitives had been accosted by a guard. Between one and two o'clock the lamps were extinguished in the streets, and then the exit was more safely accomplished. There were many officers who desired to leave, who were so weak and feeble that they were dragged through the tunnel by mere force, and carried to places of security, until such time as they would be able to move on their journey. At half-past 2 o'clock, Captain Joyce, Colonel Kendrick, and Lieutenant Bradford passed out in the order in which they are named, and as Colonel Kendrick emerged from the hole he heard the guard within a few feet of him sing out: Post No. 7, half-past 2 in the morning and all is well. Lieutenant Bradford was intrusted with the provisions for this squad, and in getting through was obliged to leave his haversack behind him, as he could not get through with it upon him. Once out they proceeded up the street, keeping in the
L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion, How the prisoners escaped prom the Richmond jail-incredible underground work-friendship of Virginia negroes. (search)
ited States uniform, but little suspicion could be excited, even if the fugitives had been accosted by a guard. Between one and two o'clock the lamps were extinguished in the streets, and then the exit was more safely accomplished. There were many officers who desired to leave, who were so weak and feeble that they were dragged through the tunnel by mere force, and carried to places of security, until such time as they would be able to move on their journey. At half-past 2 o'clock, Captain Joyce, Colonel Kendrick, and Lieutenant Bradford passed out in the order in which they are named, and as Colonel Kendrick emerged from the hole he heard the guard within a few feet of him sing out: Post No. 7, half-past 2 in the morning and all is well. Lieutenant Bradford was intrusted with the provisions for this squad, and in getting through was obliged to leave his haversack behind him, as he could not get through with it upon him. Once out they proceeded up the street, keeping in the
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Roster of the Nineteenth regiment Massachusetts Volunteers (search)
, priv., (E), Jan. 12, ‘65; 25; disch. May 6, ‘65. Jordan, John, priv., (—), Dec. 5, ‘62; 26; N. F.R. Jordan, John F., priv., (B), Aug. 22, ‘61; 19; wounded Dec. 13, ‘62; re-en. Dec. 21, ‘63; pris. June 22, ‘64 to Apr. 28, ‘65; M. O. June 30, ‘65. Jordan, Nathan B., priv., (H), Aug. 12, ‘61; 23; wounded Sept. 17, ‘62; transf. to V. R.C. from Co. I, Sept. 17, ‘63. Joy, Edward, priv., (C), May 25, ‘64; 36; sub. W. T. Hanchitt; capt'd. Aug. 25, ‘64, Ream's Station; not heard from since. Joyce, John, priv., (—), Dec. 2, ‘62; 26; N. F.R. Kain, Charles, priv., (B), Dec. 30, ‘61; 38; deserted May 6, ‘65. Kannett, Geo. A., priv., (C), Aug. 12, ‘62; 25; disch. disa. Mar. 21, ‘63. Keating, John, priv., (E), May 27, ‘64; 32; sub. S. W. Avery; abs. pris. war since June 22, ‘64. Keefe, Cornelius, priv., (—), Aug. 9, ‘62; 27; N. F.R. Keefe, David, priv., (—), Aug. 15, ‘61; 19; N. F.R. Keefe, Jos. P., priv., (—), Aug. 5, ‘61; 18; N. F.R
634, for New England and narrowly escaped shipwreck. The next year, he was more successful, and arrived safely, with his wife and two (or three) children. His w. Joyce d. in Nov. 1638, and he m. Margaret——. His chil. were Samuel, b. in England about 1630; Lydia, b. in England about 1632, m. John Sprague of Malden, 2 May 1651; Na old in 1691, Depo.), and after his arrival here, Benjamin; John, b. 11 Sept. 1645; Martha; Philip, b. about 1650; William, b. 28 Ap. 1655; Jason, b. 14 Nov. 1658; Joyce, b. 31 Mar. 1660, m. Edmund Rice of Sudbury before 1681. It is not known that this family was connected with that of John (1), or that of Richard of Chs. William ary d. 24 June 1691. 4. Benjamin, s. of William (2), by w. Rebecca, had Rebecca, b.——, d. 2 Feb. 1673; Jason, b. 10 May 1674; Benjamin, b. 2 and d. 19 Ap. 1676; Joyce, b. 14 May 1677; Sarah, b. 4 July 1679. 5. John, s. of William (2), m. Elizabeth, dau. of David Fiske, and had Martha, b. 1 Aug. and d. 7 Nov. 1675; David; Jo
uch older than himself. His chil., all by the first wife, were Charles Henry, John, and Hannah, who m. Elhanan W. Russell, 18 Oct. 1838. John the f. was a farmer, res. on the southerly side of North Avenue, near Cedar Street, and was killed on the Fitchburg Railroad track, 3 Feb. 1853. Goffe, Edward, embarked with Shepard in 1634, for New England and narrowly escaped shipwreck. The next year, he was more successful, and arrived safely, with his wife and two (or three) children. His w. Joyce d. in Nov. 1638, and he m. Margaret——. His chil. were Samuel, b. in England about 1630; Lydia, b. in England about 1632, m. John Sprague of Malden, 2 May 1651; Nathaniel, b. Feb. 1637-8, d. 23 Aug. 1645; Deborah, b. 15 Dec. 1639, d. 21 Nov. 1660 Hannah, b. 23 Mar. 1643-4, m. John Moore of Windsor, Conn., 21 Sept. 1664; Abiah, b. 1 Ap. 1646, m. Henry Woolcott, of Windsor, Conn., 12 Oct. 1664. A dau. Mary d. 23 Ap. 1646. Edward the f. d. 26 Dec. 1658; his w. Margaret m. John Witchfield, of
Judges. 2. William, by w. Martha, had Joseph, b. in England about 1636 (55 years old in 1691, Depo.), and after his arrival here, Benjamin; John, b. 11 Sept. 1645; Martha; Philip, b. about 1650; William, b. 28 Ap. 1655; Jason, b. 14 Nov. 1658; Joyce, b. 31 Mar. 1660, m. Edmund Rice of Sudbury before 1681. It is not known that this family was connected with that of John (1), or that of Richard of Chs. William the f. was a carpenter, and appears to have res. in Menot. He d. 14 Feb. 1661; his was a carpenter, res. in Menot., and d. between 14 Nov. and 17 Dec. 1694; his w. Mary d. 24 June 1691. 4. Benjamin, s. of William (2), by w. Rebecca, had Rebecca, b.——, d. 2 Feb. 1673; Jason, b. 10 May 1674; Benjamin, b. 2 and d. 19 Ap. 1676; Joyce, b. 14 May 1677; Sarah, b. 4 July 1679. 5. John, s. of William (2), m. Elizabeth, dau. of David Fiske, and had Martha, b. 1 Aug. and d. 7 Nov. 1675; David; Jonathan; William; Abigail, b. 18 Ap. 1686; Patience, b.——, d. 27 May 1688; Esther, b
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoranda of Thirty-Eighth Virginia infantry. (search)
y from our lines, near Bermuda Hundreds, which was accomplished with the loss of one killed and wounded. Since that time my regiment has been holding one of the most exposed positions on this most important line, and has been engaged in several skirmishes with the enemy since occupying its present position. August the 25th, the enemy's picket line in my front was captured with some prisoners, but my loss here was not repaid by the advantage gained, having lost two very valuable officers—Captain Joyce, Company A, killed, and Captain W. G. Caba niss, shot through the face, so as to disable him from service—besides some good men. November the 17th, it being desirable to advance our picket line, and all necessary arrangements being made, the line being slightly reinforced moved forward, and before the enemy well knew what was going on the larger number were prisoners. I lost one man wounded in this charge, established my picket line as far as was desired, captured about thirty-seven pri
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