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, J. M. Sanford, Chas. S. Jacobs, Alex. Gregg, Surveyor of Highways. John T. White,Constables. Elisha Tolman, Amos Hemphill, John T. White, Collector of Taxes. Eleazer Davis,Field Drivers. Willard Butters, Thos. Gillard, Pyam Cushing,Fence Viewers. Peter C. Hall, Nathan W. Wait, John T. White,Fish Committee. Amos Hemphill, Elbridge Teel, Henry H. Jacquith, Pound Keeper. John Sparrell,Surveyors of Lumber. Jas. O. Curtis, J. T. Foster, E. Stetson, J. Loring, S. Lapham, O. Joyce, J. Stetson, J. Taylor, P. Curtis, P. Cushing, E. Hayden, G. T. Goodwin, A. Hutchens, R. E. Ells, H. Taylor, C. S. Jacobs, B. R. Teel, E. Waterman, J. Sanborn, T. T. Fowler, J. Clapp, B. H. Samson, Expenses. The first book kept by the Treasurer is lost. From the second, which begins in 1729, and others of later date, the following items of expenses are taken. The modern modes of book-keeping were not known to our fathers. There were sometimes two or three rates ma
ilt.location.building-Committee.master-workmen.cost. 1835.Primary, Union Street.Horatio A. Smith, Galen James, and Milton James.Caldwell & Wyatt.$1040.00. 1837.Primary, Park Street.Galen James, James W. Brooks, James O. Curtis, & Saml. Joyce.Oakman Joyce and John Sables.3454.64. 1840.High & Grammar, High Street.Oakman Joyce, D. Lawrence, and James O. Curtis.Charles Caldwell & Wm. B. Thomas.7568.77. 1851.Brooks, Brooks Street.John B. Hatch and James M. Usher.George A. Caldwell.2542.98. 1851.Oakman Joyce, D. Lawrence, and James O. Curtis.Charles Caldwell & Wm. B. Thomas.7568.77. 1851.Brooks, Brooks Street.John B. Hatch and James M. Usher.George A. Caldwell.2542.98. 1851.Primary, Salem Street.Geo. T. Goodwin, Henry Taylor, and M. E. Knox.J. J. Beaty and I. H. Bradlee.3375.41. 1852.Everett, Salem Street.Robert L. Ells, Samuel Joyce, and Henry Taylor.James Pierce.7166.57. The town proceeded immediately to the building of a new schoolhouse, on the spot where the Park-street house was burned. April 2, 1855, Messrs. Franklin Patch, Judah Loring, and Charles S. Jacobs were chosen a committee to produce a plan, publish proposals, and carry forward the work,--con
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 4., Medford Historical Society. (search)
rthur T. Haskins, Mrs. M. J. Hayes, Edward W. Hayes, Mrs. Ellen R. Hayes, Mrs. C. B. Hayes, Miss Martha E. Hedenburg, Dr. James. Herriott, Miss Adelaide S. Hervey, James A. Hinckley, Miss Ella S. Hobbs, Lewis F. Hobbs, Mrs. Victoria B. Hodges, Gilbert. Hogan, Mrs. Mary. Hollis, Benjamin P. Hollis, Mrs. Mary B. Hooper, John H. Hooper, Mrs. John H. Johnson, Cleophas B. Jones, Charles N. Jones, Mrs. Frances W. Jones, Miss Amy W. Joyce, Allston P. Kennedy, Miss Alice J. Kidder, Fred H. Kidder, Mrs. C. Edith. Kingman, William F. Kummer, Charles E. Lane, George H. Langell, Everard I. Law, Colonel Asa. Larkin Charles E. Lawrence, Hon. Samuel C. Lawrence, Mrs. Carrie R. Life Members.Lawrence, Rosewell B. Leavitt, Harry B. Leary, Mrs. Fanny S. Leighton, Miss Ella. Leonard, Benjamin C. Libby, John F. Lincoln, Miss Agnes W. Litchfield, Parker R. Locke, Edwin F. Loom
prenticeship with the late Noah Brooks, of South Boston, from which place he came to Medford and lived in the house of Oakman Joyce. He formed a partnership with Mr. Henry Ewell. They built here fifty-one vessels. He died at Nantasket beach at his East Boston, continuing in the same business. From 1831 to 1860 many of the houses on Ship street were built by Mr. Oakman Joyce, who came to Medford with his brother Samuel Joyce from Marshfield; and bought land along the street between Mr. Magston, Maine, in 1808, came early to Medford and learned shipcarpenter-ing of Sprague & James. His home was next above Oakman Joyce's. In 1856 he worked for Mr. Magoun, and during the Civil War, in the navy yard. In 1873 he was working in Mr. Fosterthe time he built it, fifty-two years. He came from Marshfield, born there in 1818. In 1834 he apprenticed himself to Oakman Joyce, to learn carpentering and joinering, which trade he followed through life. His thoroughness and skill still speak i
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 6., The Baptist Church of Medford. (search)
ss shop (all in one building). A ten-footer, occupied by an Irish family and three stables, were all totally destroyed. The conflagration swept on before a strong northwest wind until about twelve o'clock, when it came to the lumber yard of Oakman Joyce, two-thirds of which was destroyed, when its progress was checked. The old Nathan Wait house, nearly opposite the hotel, came near being destroyed, but fortunately, the flames in this direction were stayed. Mr. John Schwartz' saw factory w His furniture and his own and his wife's clothing were all lost. Some of the houses named above were occupied by James Hyde, Henry Forbes, Aborn, the hatter, on Washington street, Boston. Mr. Lawrence's loss is about $2,500, no insurance. Mr. Joyce had about $5,000 of lumber destroyed. Accommodating.—We feel under special obligations to Mr. Tarbox of the Revere House Stables, on Hanover street, for the prompt manner in which he furnished us with a carriage last night, at a late hour, t
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 12., The pump in the market place; and other water supplies of Medford, old and modern. (search)
names are those of men whose lives were a part of Medford's history, and some were known personally by many living today: William Bradbury, Timothy Dexter, Nathan Wait, Daniel Symmes, Darius Wait, John T. Cram, William A. Egery, Thomas Pratt, Oakman Joyce, Nathan W. Wait, Benjamin Moore and R. G. Pinkham. Timothy Dexter's name occurs most frequently as having had bills approved for repairing the pumps. The Waits and Symmeses were blacksmiths; Thomas Pratt, Oakman Joyce, R. G. Pinkham were cOakman Joyce, R. G. Pinkham were carpenters. The last named did a good deal of work on pumps also, and died a few years ago, the last of those here mentioned. John T. Cram was a pump maker and lived on the southerly side of Ship street, opposite Pleasant street, in the little house still standing. He furnished a pine pump in 1843 for Malden's town well, at a cost of $16.67. Dec. 7, 1801 Voted To have guide Boards put up in Market place in Medford, in most suitable place. 25 May 1812 Voted To allow Field Vining's accoun
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 22., The Medford library building. (search)
hitectural style to please his wife, and that he built the L at the rear to live in and to suit himself. Certainly there was a contrast, in that it was perfectly plain, with low-studded rooms, like a ship's cabin, and these were the ones mostly used. By the alterations for library use these have disappeared. By the removal of part of the second floor, partitions, and exterior wall in one story they have become the reading room and part of the corridor. It is doubtful if Mr. Magoun expected the library to grow to its present proportions when he suggested the librarian's residence in those cabin-like rooms. It has been said that Oakman Joyce of Medford was the builder. This is not unlikely, as a little later (1839) he built the Unitarian church. Whoever he was, his work does him credit. In this article we have been unable to answer our own queries. Possibly it may serve to awaken other and more successful ones that may add to our knowledge of old Medford's history. M. W. M.