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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A vindication of Virginia and the South. (search)
made his name and kingdom fill the world with their renown. He died one hundred years after Saul was anointed, and then Jerusalem and the temple being finished, the ten tribes — supposing the necessity of further taxation had ceased — petitioned Rehoboam for a reduction of taxes, a repeal of the tariff. Their petition was scorned, and the world knows the result. The ten tribe seceded in a body, and there was war; so thus there remained to the house of David only the tribes of Benjamin and Judah. They, like the North, had received the benefit of this taxation. The chief part of the enormous expenditures was made within their borders, and they, like New England, flourished and prospered at the expense of their brethren. By the Constitution, a citizen of the South had a right to pursue his fugitive slave into any of the States, apprehend and bring him back; but so unfriendly had the North become towards the South, and so regardless of her duties under the Constitution, that South
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Advance on the City of Mexico-battle of Contreras-assault at Churubusco-negotiations for peace-battle of Molino del Rey-storming of Chapultepec-San Cosme-evacuation of the City-Halls of the Montezumas (search)
struction until within gun-shot of the point where the road we were on intersects that running east to the city, the point where the aqueduct turns at a right angle. I have described the defences of this position before. There were but three commissioned officers besides myself, that I can now call to mind, with the advance when the above position was reached. One of these officers was a Lieutenant [Raphael] Semmes, of the Marine Corps. I think Captain [John] Gore and Lieutenant [Henry] Judah, of the 4th infantry, were the others. Our progress was stopped for the time by the single piece of artillery at the angle of the roads and the infantry occupying the house-tops back from it. West of the road from where we were, stood a house occupying the south-west angle made by the San Cosme road and the road we were moving upon. A stone wall ran from the house along each of these roads for a considerable distance and thence back until it joined, enclosing quite a yard about the hou
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 127 (search)
he 14th, conforming to the movement of troops on the right and the general plan of advance, the division moved forward from one position to another until the enemy's main lines were reached. The troops on several parts of our lines had become warmly engaged with the enemy during the forenoon, and his main line of battle in front of our right was well developed. In the afternoon, in compliance with orders, I sent Mitchell's brigade to the support of a part of our lines, composed of Brigadier-General Judah's command, of the Twenty-third Corps, and Brigadier-General Turchin's brigade, of the Fourteenth Corps, which were reported as being hard pressed by the enemy. This brigade moved promptly and gallantly into position. Relieving these troops, they entered immediately into the fight. The conduct of this brigade was highly creditable to both officers and men. Colonel Mitchell's conduct was conspicuous on this occasion for personal gallantry. My batteries were exceedingly well posted
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 151 (search)
ime. I had not previously known that the enemy had works in our vicinity, nor was I then informed as to their position, their character, or the manner in which the attack was to be made. There was, of course, no time for a reconnaissance by me without neglecting to advance along with Major-General Schofield, as ordered. I had barely time to give the proper instructions to Brigadier-General Turchin on my left, and was communicating the same to the right brigade, when the troops of Brigadier-General Judah, on General Schofield's right, came up with my left. His front line passed through my rear line before mine began to advance, and, thus interlaced, both went forward together. It was subsequently ascertained that the rebel line of works ran along the western slope of a ridge, which extended from near Resaca northward, on the west side of the railroad. A narrow valley, intersected along its length by a boggy creek, separated this from another ridge which lay parallel with and in f
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Resaca. (search)
ime. I had not previously known that the enemy had works in our vicinity, nor was I then informed as to their position, their character, or the manner in which the attack was to be made. There was, of course, no time for a reconnaissance by me without neglecting to advance along with Major-General Schofield, as ordered. I had barely time to give the proper instructions to Brigadier-General Turchin on my left, and was communicating the same to the right brigade, when the troops of Brigadier-General Judah, on General Schofield's right, came up with my left. His front line passed through my rear line before mine began to advance, and, thus interlaced, both went forward together. It was subsequently ascertained that the rebel line of works ran along the western slope of a ridge, which extended from near Resaca northward, on the west side of the railroad. A narrow valley, intersected along its length by a boggy creek, separated this from another ridge which lay parallel with and in f
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 155 (search)
was immediately doubled in strength and the enemy's skirmishers driven back to the second line of hills. General Turchin then gave orders to Col. M. B. Walker, Thirty-first Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry, to advance the front line of the brigade and occupy the first line of hills. This was immediately done, the second line moving at the same time, with the proper interval. Shortly after the brigade had arrived at the top of the hill it was observed that General Hascall's brigade, of General Judah's division, was moving in a double line of battle to the front, on a line of direction which brought it upon the rear of this brigade. Not understanding the nature of the movement, our lines stood fast until General Hascall's front line had passed our front line and his rear line our rear line. See map: Zzz At this time General Baird gave the order that this brigade should advance as General Hascall's brigade advanced, and the troops were immediately ordered forward, advancing
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 156 (search)
avy skirmish fire until we reached a point about threequarters of a mile from the rebel fortifications, which were some two miles north of Resaca. While here General Judah's division, of the Twenty-third Army Corps, which was to the left and partly in our rear, advanced in two lines to attack and storm the rebel works. As the brill. From there they could be plainly seen. In front of my regiment I had two companies as skirmishers, to wit, A and B, under command of Captain Whedon. As General Judah's troops advanced in front of my regiment, my skirmish line went forward and drove the rebel skirmishers into their works. When General Judah's first line reaGeneral Judah's first line reached a small ravine, some 200 yards from the rebel works, it stopped, and the men took shelter in it from a most murderous fire that was then being poured in upon them from the rebel lines, and commenced returning the fire. The second line being also similarly situated, advanced rapidly, and took shelter in the same ravine as best
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 159 (search)
General Turchin, then in command of the brigade, to allow Hascall's brigade, in Judah's division, of the Twenty-third Corps, already formed in two lines of battle in out, and as we advanced the enemy's skirmishers were driven into their works. Judah's division moved impetuously to the charge, and we had to follow at rapid pace.een ordered to close my line into column. I perceived on reaching the top that Judah's division did not halt under cover of the hill to rest the men and organize th a murderous fire of artillery and infantry at from 300 to 400 yards distance. Judah's lines were giving way to the left, and most of them retiring from the attack.at we were almost entirely unsupported, for we had become, by the retirement of Judah, the front. Some of his men had taken refuge in the low ground on my left, and for a long time he could not be found. In the mean time, through an aide, General Judah had sent word he meant to renew the assault. At last General Turchin was f
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 160 (search)
rmer position. On the 14th the regiment was deployed on the right of the front line of the brigade, and, being ordered to send out skirmishers, details of veterans from each company, under command of Capt. W. H. Wade, were advanced onto a ridge in front of the open field, then occupied by the brigade. The skirmishers were soon engaged, and soon after the whole line was ordered to advance. Upon reaching the crest of the second ridge a line of troops, said to belong to Hascall's brigade, of Judah's division, Army of the Ohio, advanced from the woods in our rear, and passing our front line, advanced some paces in its front. The regiment being then ordered forward, upon reaching the crest of a third ridge, it was exposed to a heavy fire of artillery from batteries planted upon hills on the opposite side of a valley and distant about 500 yards. The word being still forward, the regiment rushed down a nearly precipitous declivity and advanced to the edge of a creek, over which the front
rebels, who were just then opening fire on General Judah's forces. The battle, although it has beelds at the end of the by-road or lane, and General Judah's men coming down on the pike road had coma little way above the pike road, by which General Judah's forces had come up from Portsmouth. Thi at two o'clock on Sunday morning. When General Judah started from Portsmouth on Thursday eveninthis encounter Captain John J. Grafton, of General Judah's staff, became separated from the advancece to cooperate when he might with advantage. Judah arrived, after a hasty march of less than two ager desire to go ahead, for all felt that General Judah knew his business, although he was sufferiorces were sent in different directions by Generals Judah and Hobson to intercept the enemy. All th is the greatest victory of the war, and makes Judah and Hobson rightly entitled to two stars. Jud After the fight Captain Wood reported to General Judah for duty, with the boat, and was highly co[11 more...]
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