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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.35 (search)
sketch. Judah Phillips Benjamin was the son of English parents, and was born in 1811. His mother and father were on their way from England to New Orleans. Arriving off the mouth of the Mississippi river, it was found to be blockaded by British men-of-war, so their vessel turned back and put in at St. Croix. Here it was, on English soil, that young Benjamin first saw the light of day. In 1815 the Benjamins moved to Wilmington, N. C., and ten years later, when only a lad of fourteen, Judah was sent to Yale. He remained there only three years, and left before taking his degree. Upon attaining his majority he was admitted to practice at the bar in New Orleans, and soon forged his way to the front. In 1847 he was engaged as counsel in the famous Spanish land cases, which involved the ownership of immense properties in California. For his legal services in this controversy he received the largest fee on record at that time, $25,000. Mr. Benjamin in 1852 was sent to the Unit
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.44 (search)
y, that the Benjamins came to the United States when Judah was only four or five years of age, and Mr. Ezekiel of their immigration was 1815. Mr. Belden says that Judah and his brother Solomon, and his sister Hannah, came became pupils in the Fayetteville Academy, and that Judah was a classmate of mine during his stay in Fayetteville. Continuing, Mr. Belden says: Mr. Levy (Judah's uncle), desiring to enlarge his business, removed with his If they prove anything, these statements prove that Judah could not have been in Fayetteville much more than oranspire that Mr. Belden really attended school with Judah at the old brick school-house in St. Michael's alleyton, S. C., who is still living, says that he was in Judah's class; that Judah was a very bright pupil, and quoJudah was a very bright pupil, and quoted Shakespeare while playing marbles; that his teacher was Robert Southworth. Among his classmates, or schoolhis naturalization papers here. After the war, when Judah wished to enter the English Bar, it was necessary fo