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Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Sketch of the principal maritime expeditions. (search)
that of the Scandinavians. From 527 to 584, three new expeditions, under Ida and Cridda, placed England in the power of the Saxons, who formed of it seven kingdoms. It is only at the end of three centuries (833) that this Heptarchy is united into a single State under Egbert. By a movement the reverse of that of the Vandals, the African populations, visited in their turn the South of Europe. The Moors crossed in 712 the Straits of Gibraltar, under the conduct of Tarik. Invited by Count Julian, they came at first only to the number of five thousand, and far from experiencing a strong resistance, they were favored by the numerous enemies of the Visigoths. Then was the fine time of Califs, and the Arabs could indeed pass for liberators in comparison with the oppressors of the North. The army of Tarik, soon increased to twenty thousand men, conquered king Rodrigo at Xeres de la Frontera, and subjected the kingdom. By degrees, several millions of inhabitants from Mauritania, pas
, of Watertown, and had--   Charles.   Nathaniel, b. 1760; d. 1832.   Abigail, m. Isaac Collins.   Of these,--   Nathaniel Willis m. Lucy Douglass, of New London, and had--   Andrew, d. young.   Nathaniel, b. June 6, 1780.   Rebecca, b. 1782; m. Samuel Richards.   He m., 2d, Mary Cartmell, and had--   Sarah, m. Judge Easton, of La.   Mary, m.----McDonald.   Eliza, m. D. R. Ferguson.   Catharine, m.----Carpenter.   Madeline, m. Hiram Still.   James M.   Henry C.   Matilda.   Julian D., deceased.   The oldest son, Nathaniel, is the well-known publisher in Boston. He m., July 22, 1803, Hannah Parker, who was b. Jan. 28, 1782, and d. Mar. 21, 1844. Their children were--   Lucy D., b. May 11, 1804; m. J. F. Bumstead.    Nathaniel Parker, the well-known author, b. Jan. 20, 1806; m.1st, Oct. 1, 1835, M. Stace, who d. Mar. 25, 1845; 2d, C. Grinnell, Oct. 1, 1846, who was b. Mar. 19, 1826.   Louisa H., b. May 11, 1807.   Ju
year is Lady-day of the Old Style, that is, new Lady-day March 25, + the 11 days removed by act of Parliament 1752, = April 6; thus embodying both the ancient practices, namely, the commencement of the year at about the vernal equinox and the old Julian style, which had lost 11 days in 1798 years. The Mexicans had a year of 360 days and 5 supplementary days. They divided it into 18 months of 20 days each, and had a leap-year. Their year commenced at the vernal equinox. The Peruvian year 135, became a Roman colony from which Jews were rigorously excluded. Constantine restored the name and made it a Christian city about A. D. 326. Five centuries of peace, a long period for Jerusalem, followed the restoration under Constantine and Julian. Then followed the Persian, Chosroes II., A. D. 614; Heraclius retrieved it in 628; but Omar subdued it, A. D. 637. The Christians regained it but for a brief and bloody interval of 87 years, in the eleventh and twelfth centuries, when it was c
ot nearly so ancient as that at Elephanta, which consists of a staircase between two walls descending to the Nile. One wall has engraved upon it a series of marks representing the hight to which the water has risen on certain occasions. The cubits here are divided into 14ths, or double digits, and measure 1 foot 8.625 inches. This nilometer was described by Strabo, 54 B. C. The nilometer at Memphis was transferred by Constantine to a church in the vicinity of the Serapeum of Alexandria; Julian sent it back to the building at Memphis, where it remained till its destruction by Theodosius. At the present day the rise is watched for with anxiety, and proclaimed by 4 criers. The object of the nilometers formerly was to settle the amount of taxation to be imposed upon the country. It may still be the basis of the impost of taxes in that overridden country. Eminent domain there includes the land, the poor fellahs upon it, and the water. The effect of the rise is a gradual elev
principles of Freedom which we seek to establish under the Constitution of the United States. In the Senate, Mr. Hale is admitted to be foremost in aptitude and readiness of debate, whether in the general legislation of the country, or in the constant and valiant championship of our cause. His genial and sun-like nature irradiates the antagonism of political controversy, while his active and practical mind, richly stored with various experience, never fails to render good service. Of Mr. Julian, our candidate for the Vice-Presidency, let me say simply that, in ability and devotion to our principles, he is a worthy compeer of Mr. Hale. To vote for such men will itself be a pleasure. But it will be doubly so when we reflect that in this way we bear our testimony to a noble cause, with which the happiness, welfare and fame of our country are indissolubly connected. With such a cause and such candidates, let no man be disheartened. The tempest may blow, but ours is a life-boat
principles of Freedom which we seek to establish under the Constitution of the United States. In the Senate, Mr. Hale is admitted to be foremost in aptitude and readiness of debate, whether in the general legislation of the country, or in the constant and valiant championship of our cause. His genial and sun-like nature irradiates the antagonism of political controversy, while his active and practical mind, richly stored with various experience, never fails to render good service. Of Mr. Julian, our candidate for the Vice-Presidency, let me say simply that, in ability and devotion to our principles, he is a worthy compeer of Mr. Hale. To vote for such men will itself be a pleasure. But it will be doubly so when we reflect that in this way we bear our testimony to a noble cause, with which the happiness, welfare and fame of our country are indissolubly connected. With such a cause and such candidates, let no man be disheartened. The tempest may blow, but ours is a life-boat
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 7: fiction II--contemporaries of Cooper. (search)
der and law. Richard Hurdis (1838), Border Beagles (1840), Beauchampe (1842), and Charlemont (1856) are amazingly sensational. Nor was Simms happy when he abandoned native for foreign history, as in Pelayo (1838), The Damsel of Darien (1839), Count Julian (1845), and Vasconselos (1854). Even more than Cooper, he lacked judgment as to the true province of his art; like Cooper, he constantly turned aside to put his pen to service in the distracted times through which he was fated to live. His the chief writers were William Ware (1797-1852), and Sylvester Judd (1813-53). Ware, a clergyman and fair classical scholar, wrote three novels, Letters from Palmyra (1837), later called Zenobia, Probus (1838), a sequel now known as Aurelian, and Julian (1841), which, though strongly biased in favour of the creed Ware preached, and often diffuse and monotonous, had still enough force and charm to have continued to be read by those to whom all books dealing with the origins of Christianity are an
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
, 311, 314, 36, 317, 318, 319, 320,322,324,325 Cooper, Myles, 138 Cooper, Thomas, 202 Cooper, Judge, William, 293, 294 Coquette, the, 285, 286 Cornwallis, 144, 145 Cortez, 287, 319 Cotton, Rev.John, 21, 35-38, 43,50, 158 Count Julian, 317 Countryman, Letters of A, 148 Courier (Charleston), 237 Court of fancy, the, 176 Cousin, Victor, 332 Cowley, 112, 177 Cowper, 166, 178 n., 180, 263, 273, 276 Cox, Ross, 210 Cox, William, 241 Coxe, Tench, 148 of Journal of the Continental Congress, 144 Journal of the Federal Convention, 146 Journal of the taking of Cape Breton, a, 9 Journals (Emerson), 351, 355, 357 Judah, S. B., 231 Judd, Sylvester, 324 Julia, or the Wanderer, 220 Julian, 324 Juliet Grenville, 284 Julius Caesar, 225 Junto Club, 95, 105, 122, 161 K Kalm, Pehr, 186 Kaloolah, 320 Kames, Lord, 91, 97 Kant, 332, 334, 357 Katherine Walton, 315 Kean, Charles, 224, 240 Keats, John, 260, 262, 26
avy Art'y. Hudson, Thomas,36Boston, Ma.Aug. 30, 1864Aug. 11, 1865, expiration of service. Hurd, Henry,23Boston, Ma.July 31, 1861Aug. 16, 1864, expiration of service. Jackman, Henry A.,32Boston, Ma.July 31, 1861Jan. 5, 1864, re-enlistment. Jaunotte, Abraham,26Hadley, Ma.Jan. 25, 1864Aug. 11, 1865, expiration of service. Jeffords, George R.,40Rowe, Ma.Aug. 30, 1864June 11, 1865, expiration of service. Jennings, Stephen E.,29Chicopee, Ma.July 31, 1864Aug. 11, 1865, expiration of service. Julian, George N.,20Exeter, N. H.,July 31, 1861Sept. 18, 1862, Capt. 18th N. H. Vols. Kelly, Robert N.,23Boston, Ma.Dec. 19, 1863Aug. 11, 1865, expiration of service. Kelly, Thomas,28Boston, Ma.Dec. 18, 1863Aug. 11, 1865, expiration of service. Kimball, Martin B.,25Boston, Ma.Oct. 16, 1861Oct. 16, 1864, expiration of service. King, Phineas F.,26Watertown, Ma.July 31, 18611862, disability. Knight, Thomas W.,19Boston, Ma.July 31, 1861Aug. 16, 1864, expiration of service. Knights, William W.,
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays, The Greek goddesses. (search)
on in his Drink to me only with thine eyes. e)moi\ de\ mo/nois pro/pine toi=s o)/mmasin. Philostratus, Letter 24. The parallel passages may be found in Cumberland's Observer, No. 74, where they were first pointed out. And if, following Ben Jonson, we wish to know what man can say in a little, we must seek it in such poems as this by Plato, preserved in the Anthology:-- My star, upon the stars thou gazest. Would that I were heaven, that on thee I might look with many eyes! Or this by Julian, on a picture:-- The painter [depicts] Theodota herself. Had he but failed in his art, and given forgetfulness to her mourners! *lh/qhn dw=ken o)durome/nois. Brunck's Analecta, 2.502. Or this other picture-song by Paulus Silentiaris:-- The pencil has scarce missed [the beauty of] the maiden's eyes, or her hair, or the consummate splendor of her bloom. If any one can paint flickering sunbeams, he can paint also the flickering [beauty of] Theodorias. marmarugh\n *qeodwria/dos. B
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