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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 40 6 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hayes, Isaac Israel 1832-1881 (search)
Hayes, Isaac Israel 1832-1881 Explorer; born in Chester county, Pa., March 5, 1832; graduated in medicine at the University of Pennsylvania in 1853. He was surgeon of the second Grinnell expedition to the polar seas under Dr. Elisha Kent Kane (q. v.) Satisfied of the existence of an open polar sea, he wrote and lectured on the subject on his return. He excited such interest in the subject that, with the aid of subscriptions in Europe and the United States, he was enabled to fit out the steamer United States, of 133 tons, in which he sailed from Boston, July 9, 1860, with thirteen other persons, for the Arctic regions. They anchored, after a perilous voyage, in Port Foulke, on the west coast of Greenland, in lat. 78° 17′, on Sept. 9, where they wintered. In April, 1861, with twelve men and fourteen dogs, he pushed northward over the ice in a boat; but finally the vessel was sent back, and Dr. Hayes, with three companions and two dog-sledges, pressed on to land in lat. 81° 37′, <
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kane, Elisha Kent 1820- (search)
Kane, Elisha Kent 1820- Explorer; born in Philadelphia, Feb. 20, 1820; was educated at the universities of Virginia and Pennsylvania, taking his medical degree in 1843. Ill-health led to his enaversed Greece on foot, explored western Africa to some extent, was in the war with Mex- Elisha Kent Kane. ico, and in May, 1850, sailed as surgeon and naturalist under Lieut. Edwin J. De Haven, inl fitted out another expedition for the same purpose in 1853. Two vessels, under the command of Dr. Kane, sailed from New York in May. Kane and his party made valuable discoveries, among others, of aKane and his party made valuable discoveries, among others, of an open polar sea, long suspected and sought for by scientific men and navigators. But they failed to find Sir John Franklin. The companies of these two vessels suffered much, and were finally compelhey returned home in the vessels of the latter in the autumn of 1855. Gold medals were awarded Dr. Kane by Congress, the legislature of New York, and the Royal Geographical Society of London; but his
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Maryland, State of. (search)
ts; no punishment had been awarded, and, I believe, no arrests had been made for these atrocious crimes; supplies of provisions intended for this garrison had been stopped; the intention to capture this fort had been boldly proclaimed; your most public thoroughfares had been daily patrolled by large numbers of troops armed and clothed, at least in part, with articles stolen from the United States, and the federal flag, while waving on the federal offices, was cut down [by order of the chief of police Kane] by some person wearing the uniform of a Maryland soldier. To add to the foregoing, an assemblage elected in defiance of law, but claiming to be the legislative body of your State, and so recognized by the executive of Maryland, was debating the federal compact. If all this be not rebellion, I know not what to call it. I certainly regard it as sufficient legal cause for suspending the privilege of the writ of habeas corpus. At the request of the governors of many States the Presi
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mormons, (search)
sed, mills and workshops were constructed, and a newspaper, The frontier guardian, was established. The city was called Kane, in honor of Colonel Kane (brother of the Arctic explorer), who gave them much aid in their exodus. During the summer andColonel Kane (brother of the Arctic explorer), who gave them much aid in their exodus. During the summer and early autumn bountiful harvests were gathered. From Kane they sent out missionaries to Oregon and California, and even to the Sandwich Islands, while others went forward deeper into the wilderness to spy out a promised land for an everlasting habitKane they sent out missionaries to Oregon and California, and even to the Sandwich Islands, while others went forward deeper into the wilderness to spy out a promised land for an everlasting habitation. They chose the Great Salt Lake Valley, enclosed within lofty and rugged mountains, fertile, isolated, and healthful; and thitherward, in the early summer of 1847, a chosen band of 143 men, accompanied by their wives and children and the memord. In the spring of 1848 fields were seeded, crops were raised, and the blessings of plenty ensued. The inhabitants of Kane pressed forward to the new Canaan; other Saints followed; and the New Jerusalem was laid out within an area of 4 square mi
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Parker, Theodore 1810- (search)
the devil, in the same act! You remember the trial, the ruling of the bench, the swearing on the stand, the witness coming back to alter and enlarge his testimony and have another gird at the prisoner! You have not forgotten the trials before Judge Kane at Philadelphia, and Judge Grier at Christiana and Wilkesbarre. These are natural results of causes well known. You cannot escape a principle. Enslave a negro, will you?—you doom to bondage your own sons and daughters by your own act . . . as if the third hypothesis would be fulfilled, and slavery triumph over freedom; as if the nation would expunge the Declaration of Independence from the scroll of time, and, instead of honoring Hancock and the Adamses and Washington, do homage to Kane and Grier and Curtis and Hallett and Loring. Then the preamble to our Constitution might read to establish justice, insure domestic strife, hinder the common defence, disturb the general welfare, and inflict the curse of bondage on ourselves and
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), San Juan Hill (search)
f the men who showed signal valor would necessitate sending in an almost complete roster of the regiment. Many of the cases which I mention stand merely as examples of the rest, not as exceptions. Captain Jenkins acted as major, and showed such conspicuous gallantry and efficiency that I earnestly hope he may be promoted to major as soon as a vacancy occurs. Captains Lewellen, Muller, and Luna led their troops throughout the charges, handling them admirably. At the end of the battle Lieutenants Kane, Greenwood, and Goodrich were in charge of their troops, immediately under my eye, and I wish particularly to commend their conduct throughout. Corporals Waller and Fortescue, and Trooper McKinley, of Troop E; Corporal Rhoades, of Troop D; Troopers Albertson, Winter, McGregor, and Ray Clark, of Troop F; Troopers Bugbe, Jackson, and Waller, of Troop A; Trumpeter McDonald, of Troop L.; Sergeant Hughes, of Troop B, and Trooper Geieren, of Troop G, all continued to fight after being wounde
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Schmucher, Samuel Mosheim 1823-1863 (search)
Schmucher, Samuel Mosheim 1823-1863 Author; born in New Market, Va., Jan. 12, 1823; graduated at Washington College, Pa., in 1840; became a Lutheran clergyman and held pastorates till 1848; was admitted to the bar in 1850, but applied himself to literary work. He was author of Election of judges by the people; Constitutionality of the Maine liquor law; Life of John C. Fremont; Life of Alexander Hamilton; History of the Mormons; Life of Thomas Jefferson; Arctic explorations and discoveries; Life of Dr. Elisha Kent Kane; Life of Daniel Webster; Life of Henry Clay; Life of Washington; Blue laws of Connecticut; A history of the Civil War, etc. He died in Philadelphia, Pa., May 12, 1863.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Tyson, Job Roberts 1803-1858 (search)
Tyson, Job Roberts 1803-1858 Lawyer; born in Philadelphia, Pa., Feb. 8, 1803; admitted to the bar in 1855-57. He was the author of Essay on the penal laws of Pennsylvania; The lottery system of the United States; Social and intellectual State of the colony of Pennsylvania Prior to 1743; Discourse on the 200th anniversary of the birth of William Penn; Report on the Arctic explorations of Dr. Elisha K. Kane, etc. He died in Montgomery county, Pa., June 27, 1858.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
search for Sir John Franklin, sail from New York City, under Lieut. E. J. De Haven, with Dr. Elisha Kent Kane as surgeon......May 23, 1850 President Taylor dies at Washington, aged sixty-six......ce-President of the United States, dies at Cahawba, Ala., aged sixty-seven......April 18, 1853 Kane sails from New York in the brig Advance, under the auspices of the United States navy, in search ary governor of Greytown, Nicaragua, by citizens......Sept. 12, 1855 Expedition in search of Dr. Kane, under Lieutenant Hartstene, U. S. N., finds at the Isle of Disco, Greenland, Kane and his compKane and his companions, who had left the ship in the ice, May 17, and reached Disco, Aug. 8......Sept. 13, 1855 This expedition returns to New York City......Oct. 11, 1855 Thirty-fourth Congress, first session, Federal troops......Jan. 6, 1857 Electoral votes counted......Feb. 11, 1857 Death of Elisha Kent Kane (arctic explorer), at Havana, Cuba, aged thirty-five......Feb. 16, 1857 Act to confirm t
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New York, (search)
ed......Jan. 1, 1849 Population of the State, 3,097,394......1850 University of Rochester, at Rochester, chartered......May 8, 1850 Arctic expedition in search of Sir John Franklin sails from New York under Lieutenant De Haven and Dr. Elisha Kent Kane......May 24, 1850 Collins line of steamships begin between New York and Liverpool—an American line......1850 Washington Hunt elected governor. 1850 Erie Railroad completed; Piermont on the Hudson to Lake Erie......April 28-29, 1851ooperstown, N. Y.......Sept. 14, 1851 Whig party disappears from State and national politics after......1852 Horatio Seymour, governor......Jan. 1, 1853 Second Arctic expedition in search of Sir John Franklin sails from New York under Dr. Kane. Funds mostly furnished by Henry Grinnell, of New York, and George Peabody. Grinnell land discovered......May 30, 1853 New York clearing-house established......1853 District libraries of the State have 1,604,210 volumes......1853 [Thi
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