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olonel Windham, of that regiment, was captured and considerable loss sustained. Colonel Cluseret with his brigade, subsequently engaged the enemy in the timber, driving him from his position and taking his camp. At about eight a battalion of Colonel Kane's Pennsylvania regiment entered the woods under the direction of Brigadier-General Bayard, and maintained for half an hour a vigorous attack, in which both sides suffered severely, driving the enemy. The enemy attempted to shell our troops, bs of infantry, supported by cavalry and artillery in position. Before they could be withdrawn, they suffered most severely, losing nearly one half their whole number, killed, wounded, and missing. Officers and men fought most gallantly. Lieut.-Colonel Kane, who commanded them, was severely wounded, and refusing to allow his men to carry him off the field, was left behind, and is undoubtedly a prisoner. Capt. Taylor, a brother of Bayard Taylor, was wounded and captured. The acting Adjutant
ing the bridge across Bull Run. Our rear-guard was composed of part of General Schurz's division, two pieces of Captain Dilyer's battery, and a detachment of (Colonel Kane's) Bucktail Rifles, which had come up with several guns collected on their march of retreat. I reached Centreville at daylight on the thirty-first of August, ordered your corps to resume its march. My first brigade, under Colonel Schimmelfennig, was to form the rear-guard, and was instructed to destroy the bridge. Colonel Kane of the Pennsylvania Bucktail Rifles reported himself to you with a battalion of his men and several pieces of artillery which he had picked up on the road. The bridge was destroyed some time after half-past 1, and I marched toward Centreville, taking with us Colonel Kane's promiscuous pieces of artillery behind the first regiment of Col. Schimmelfennig's brigade. I rejoined you about three o'clock A. M., two miles from Centreville, where we bivouacked until five. About seven we arr
ing the bridge across Bull Run. Our rear-guard was composed of part of General Schurz's division, two pieces of Captain Dilyer's battery, and a detachment of (Colonel Kane's) Bucktail Rifles, which had come up with several guns collected on their march of retreat. I reached Centreville at daylight on the thirty-first of August, ordered your corps to resume its march. My first brigade, under Colonel Schimmelfennig, was to form the rear-guard, and was instructed to destroy the bridge. Colonel Kane of the Pennsylvania Bucktail Rifles reported himself to you with a battalion of his men and several pieces of artillery which he had picked up on the road. The bridge was destroyed some time after half-past 1, and I marched toward Centreville, taking with us Colonel Kane's promiscuous pieces of artillery behind the first regiment of Col. Schimmelfennig's brigade. I rejoined you about three o'clock A. M., two miles from Centreville, where we bivouacked until five. About seven we arr
m, General, very respectfully, your obedient servant, (Signed) J. N. Brown, Lieutenant Commanding. To Brig.-Gen. M. L. Smith, Commanding Defences at Vicksburgh. A true copy: J. F. Girault, A. A. General. C. S. Gunboat Arkansas, Vicksburgh, July 23, 1862. sir: I beg leave herewith to send a list of names of the killed and wounded of the detachment who so nobly volunteered from the forces of your command, on — June last, to aid in making up a crew for this vessel, to wit: Killed — John Kane, private, Pinkney's battalion Louisiana volunteers; Charles Madden, private, Clinch's battalion Louisiana artillery; Henry Shields, company E, Antonio Florez, company G, and Daniel O'Sullivan, company A, of the Twenty-eighth Louisiana volunteers. Total killed--five. Wounded — Wm. Alexander, private, Clinch's battalion Louisiana artillery; Thomas Lynch, sergeant, Clinch's battalion Louisiana artillery; Bernard Martinez, private, Twenty-eighth Louisiana volunteers. Total wounded--four. <
though crushed back by overwhelming numbers, stood their ground until resistance was destruction. The Bucktails, under Col. Kane, of your city, covered themselves with glory. Upon repairing to the station at daylight, we found that last night thain, half a mile further up the road. The train was guarded by about two hundred of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, under Colonel Kane, who had reached here the previous day, since being wounded at Cross Keys. The men rushed out and fired a volley in the darkness, the rebels fell back, but advanced again, and, surrounding the whole party, had Col. Kane and some one hundred and forty-nine of his men prisoners. But, Providence favoring, Col. Kane, encouraging his men, sent them out one by one to tCol. Kane, encouraging his men, sent them out one by one to the rear in the storm, and when all were out followed himself; and, while the rebels were absorbed by the storm, escaped. The rebels then popped over to Pope's wagons, took all his fancy horses, papers, etc., and burned his two wagons. They also
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Company a, Fifteenth Virginia Infantry, Confederate States Army. (search)
. Hall; 19. Wounded at Sharpsburg; appointed first sergeant; promoted second lieutenant, May 16, 1864. Julius W. Herbert; 22. Wounded at Sharpsburg. John W. Johnson; 22. Not accounted for. Charles Keppler; 19. Killed at Sharpsburg. John Kane; 18. Charles Thomas Lockett; 21. Wounded at Sharpsburg, and died in Staunton. Hugh Michaels; 18. Discharged. George W. Manning; 19. Wounded at Suffolk, and leg amputated. William H. H. Mason; 19. Wounded at Drewry's Bluff. Newt Died since the war. F. P. Galley, J. B. Gathright. Died since the war. J. H. Gill, J. T. Gentry, Died since the war. M. W. Hazelwood, J. A. Hardie, Died since the war. Thomas Hardin, Died since the war. P. H. Hall, J. W. Herbert, John Kane, G. W. Manning, W. H. H. Mason, A. L. Morris, A. H. Mountcastle, W. H. Manning, G. W. Richardson, H. Schwalmeyer, H. T. Scherer, J. F. Seigle, T. E. Valentine, Died since the war. J. V. Willis, W. H. Wise, John R. Wyatt, John W. Waters, W. D
-A terrible accident occurred at New Haven, Ct., Friday. The boiler of the factory of Dan & Brothers, makers of the hook works of carriages, exploded, tearing away a portion of the building and badly injuring several persons, One, a boy, named John Kane, will die from a fracture of the skull. Two others, G. G. Baldwin and George Dewolf, were badly scalded. Another boy named Johnson was badly injured. Another boy named Rice is supposed to be buried under the ruins. The cause of the explosioe covered with the ruins. A dispatch from New Haven, Saturday, says: The boy Henry Rice, who was killed by the steam boiler explosion at Dan & Brothers' coach factory yesterday, was found under the ruins last night; nearly all his bones were crushed. The boy John Kane lives, but with no hope of his life; G. G. Baldwin and Geo. DeWolf are very low; Jos. Van Riper was badly scalded, but may live. The cause of the accident was poor boiler iron. The loss of property is about $5,000.
Mayor's Court. --The following is a summary of the cases which were before the Mayor on Saturday: Thomas Kane, John Kane, and John Camp, boys, were charged with bathing in the day time in Shockoe Creek, and exposing their persons to citizens in that neighborhood. Upon the first hearing of this case, His Honor announced his intention to require security for their good behavior; but after reflection reconsidered his decision, and discharged them with an admonition, --The practice of bathing in the city, and in the neighborhood of public places of resort, was one often indulged in by young men and boys, and one which the Mayor said should be put a stop to. He directed his officers to turn their attention particularly to this nuisance, and whenever they caught any person, no matter who he might be, indulging in the luxury in interdicted places, they must be brought before him. "Take their clothes," he said, "if you can't catch them, and let them go home naked." Garret Al