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Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 34 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 30 4 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 19 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 14 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 14 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 6 4 Browse Search
John Jay Chapman, William Lloyd Garrison 6 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 5 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for Thomas L. Kane or search for Thomas L. Kane in all documents.

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bigotry, or to trust to their isolation, and build up the kingdom on United States territory. The Mormons chose the latter course. Early in 1849 they organized the State of Deseret; but Congress ignored it, and, in September, 1850, created instead the Territory of Utah. President Fillmore appointed Brigham Young Governor; and he took the oath of office February 3, 1851. Stenhouse says, Rocky Mountain Saints, p. 275. President Fillmore appointed Brigham on the recommendation of Colonel Thomas L. Kane, and upon the assurance of that gentleman that the charges against Brigham Young's Christian morality were unfounded. A judge, the attorney, and the marshal of the district court, were also Mormons. Two of the judges were Gentiles. Thus was impressed a Mormon policy upon the Federal relations of the Territory. The Federal officers arrived in July, and were soon involved in trouble. Judge Brocchus reprobated polygamy in a public assembly, and was told by the Governor, I will k
assy. Ornithology. conflicting Policies. Colonel Kane the diplomatist. senatorial criticism on Gd for the office of such negotiation. Colonel Thomas L. Kane was a son of Judge Kane, of PhiladelphJudge Kane, of Philadelphia, and a brother of the arctic explorer — of a family connected with the President by ties of frien, where he arrived early in March. When Colonel Kane arrived, Brigham Young was already virtualln so closely identified with the enemy. Colonel Kane, after receiving the inspiration for his miry destitute of provisions, offered through Colonel Kane to send in 200 head of cattle and 15,000 ornston forbore to notice. The arrival of Colonel Kane, a self-imposed embassador, caused a slighthappening to be in personal attendance upon Colonel Kane for a short time, said, of his own motion, eve him, to keep an eye on the d—d Mormon. Colonel Kane, though in-doors, and the orderly outside, and accomplished soldier and statesman. Colonel Kane had in some manner satisfied Governor Cummi[6 more...]<
ere promptly punished; and California and Oregon emigrants will remember that their wagon-trains received escorts of dragoons over the dangerous parts of the route. In the spring of 1859 an issue arose between General Johnston and Governor Cumming, in which the latter was evidently misled by his feelings. The documents and correspondence will be found in the executive document just quoted above, and may be summarized as follows: Governor Cumming, from the time of his association with Colonel Kane, imagined that his civil functions were to protect the Mormons from the military, who were seeking their destruction; a very praiseworthy and magnanimous state of mind, if it had been founded upon facts. His error was, I presume, of the head rather than of the heart; and it is not probable that he could have so misconceived General Johnston, if he had allowed himself to become better acquainted with him. He indulged another fancy, that his office, somehow, clothed him with military autho