hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 20 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 18 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 16 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 12 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 8 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 4 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 4 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 4 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition.. You can also browse the collection for Kant or search for Kant in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

s also advancing in the power of its intelligence. The possession of reason is the engagement for that progress of which history keeps the record. The faculties of each individual mind are limited in their development; the reason of the whole Kant's Idee zu einer allgemeinen Geschichte in Weltburgerlicher Ansicht. Sammtliche Werke. VII., i. 319. strives for perfection, has been restlessly forming itself from the first moment of human existence, and has never met bounds to its capacity foralm we find; He mounts the storm and walks upon the wind. Institutions may crumble and governments fall, but it is only that they may renew a better youth, and mount upwards like the eagle. The petals of the flower wither, that fruit may form. Kant's Werke. The desire of perfection, springing always from moral power, rules even the sword, and escapes unharmed from the field of carnage; giving to battles all that they can have of lustre, and to warriors their only glory; surviving martyrdoms,
ely communicated to every American assembly. The people of Pennsylvania, said Thomas Penn, will soon be convinced by the House of Commons, as well as by the ministers, that they have not a right to the powers of government they claim. T. Penn to Hamilton, 7 July, 1757 The debates between the proprietaries of Pennsylvania and its people involved every question in dispute between the crown and the provinces, making Pennsylvania the central figure in the struggle; and Benjamin Franklin, whom Kant, in 1755, had heralded to the world of science as the Prometheus of modern times, Kants Werke, VI. 280. stood forth the foremost champion of the rights and the legislative free will of America. Every day brightened his fame and increased his influence. The House of Commons, said Penn, will end the business entirely to our satisfaction. Still the exertion of the extreme authority of parliament was postponed. The Privy Council was as yet persuaded, that they, with the king, had of them
my advanced to continue the attack, now employing its left wing also. Leuthen was carried by storm, and the Austrians were driven to retreat, losing more than six thousand in killed and wounded, more than twenty-one thousand in prisoners. The battle, which began at half past 1, was finished at five. It was the masterpiece of motion and decision, of moral firmness and warlike genius; the greatest military deed, thus far, of the century. That victory confirmed existence to the country where Kant and Lessing were carrying free inquiry to the sources of human knowledge. The soldiers knew how the rescue of their nation hung on that battle; and, as a grenadier on the field of carnage began to sing, Thanks be to God, the whole army, in the darkness of evening, standing amidst thousands of the dead, uplifted the hymn of praise. Daun fled into Bohemia, leaving in Breslau a garrison of twenty thousand men. Frederic pressed forward, and astonished Europe by gaining possession of that city