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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 15 1 Browse Search
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essfully deceived the Confederates as to his real intentions by making a demonstration towards Richmond by way of the York River and the Peninsula, along McClellan's line of march. On the night of May 4, Butler's army was embarked on transports and conveyed around to Hampton Roads; and at dawn the next morning 35,000 troops, accompanied by a squadron of war vessels under Admiral Lee, were rapidly ascending the James towards City Point, at the mouth of the Appomattox. At the same time, Gen. A. V. Kautz, with 3,000 cavalry, moving swiftly from Suffolk, south of the James, struck the Weldon Railway south of Petersburg, and burned a bridge over Stony Creek, while Col. R. M. West, with 1,800 cavalry (mostly colored men), moved from Williamsburg up the north bank of the James, keeping abreast of the grand flotilla. The bewildered Confederates made no serious opposition to these movements. A division of National troops took quiet possession of City Point (May 5) and the war vessels took a
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kautz, August Valentine 1828-1895 (search)
Kautz, August Valentine 1828-1895 Military officer; born in Ispringen, Germany, Jan. 5, 1828; brother of Admiral Kautz. His parents came to the United States the year of his birth, and in 1832 settled in Ohio. He graduated at the United States Military Academy in 1852; commissioned second lieutenant in the 4th Infantry in 18Admiral Kautz. His parents came to the United States the year of his birth, and in 1832 settled in Ohio. He graduated at the United States Military Academy in 1852; commissioned second lieutenant in the 4th Infantry in 1853; promoted first lieutenant in 1855; captain in the 6th Cavalry in 1861; colonel 8th Infantry in 1874; brigadier-general in 1891; and was retired Jan. 5, 1892. In the volunteer service he was commissioned colonel of the 2d Ohio Cavalry, Sept. 2, 1862; promoted to brigadier-general, May 7, 1864; and brevetted major-general, Oct. aider; and in the final Richmond campaign. After the war he was again engaged in operations against the Indians, serving in Arizona, California, and Nebraska. General Kautz published The Company clerk; Customs of service for non-commissioned officers and soldiers; and Customs of service for officers. He died in Seattle, Wash., Se
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Petersburg. (search)
Potomac in an attempt to capture Petersburg. On June 10 Butler sent 10,500 men, under Gillmore, and 1,500 cavalry, under Kautz, to attack the Confederates at Petersburg; at the same time two gunboats went up the Appomattox to bombard an earthwork a little below the city. The troops crossed the Appomattox 4 miles above City Point, and marched on Petersburg, while Kautz swept round to attack on the south. The enterprise was a failure, and the Nationals retired. Five days later there was anoroyers. The National line had now been extended to the Weldon road. Meanwhile a cavalry expedition, 8,000 strong, under Kautz and Wilson, had been raiding upon the railways leading southward from Petersburg, the latter being in chief command. TheSouthside Railway, and destroyed it over a space of 20 miles, fighting and defeating a cavalry force under Fitzhugh Lee. Kautz pushed on, and tore up the track of the Southside and Danville railways, at and near their junction. The united forces d