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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 27, 1864., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 3 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 3 1 Browse Search
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 3 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 2 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 2 0 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 2 0 Browse Search
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urther, and now retired a mile and a half. Thus matters stood on the right at four o'clock. A half-hour earlier, the enemy in considerable numbers had threatened our centre and left, evidently with the intention of rushing in and cutting off our communication with the reserve; but General Carter had already anticipated their intention, and had a section of Law's mountain howitzer battery placed in position on our centre. They now drew up in line of battle, when the Second Ohio cavalry, Colonel Kautz, was ordered to attack them. Major Gratz, Gen. Carter's Adjutant-General, begged permission to accompany them, when he, with Captain Pike, of company I), Second Ohio cavalry, followed by his splendid command, (the escort of the General,) and the remainder of the regiment, dashed off in splendid style. But the rebels would not stand. Our Colt's revolving rifles sent their little messengers whizzing about their ears, and away they went. The chase was kept up for five miles, the enemy c
ring volley of musketry, before which the Northerners could not stand, plowed through their ranks. The Federal line was doubled upon itself. The terrific onslaught was continued by the Confederates and resulted in forging to the entrenchments and capturing seventeen hundred prisoners, four guns, and several colors. At dusk Hill returned to his entrenchments. The Second and Sixth corps were joined in a new position. at the same time the Cavalry, under General James H. Wilson, including Kautz's division, started out to destroy the railroads. The Confederate Cavalry leader, General W. H. F. Lee, followed closely, and there were several sharp engagements. The Union Cavalry leader succeeded, however, in destroying a considerable length of track on both the Weldon and South side railroads between June 22d and 27th. Then he turned for the works at Petersburg, but found it a difficult task. The woods were alive with Confederates. Infantry swarmed on every hand. Cavalry hung on th
ring volley of musketry, before which the Northerners could not stand, plowed through their ranks. The Federal line was doubled upon itself. The terrific onslaught was continued by the Confederates and resulted in forging to the entrenchments and capturing seventeen hundred prisoners, four guns, and several colors. At dusk Hill returned to his entrenchments. The Second and Sixth corps were joined in a new position. at the same time the Cavalry, under General James H. Wilson, including Kautz's division, started out to destroy the railroads. The Confederate Cavalry leader, General W. H. F. Lee, followed closely, and there were several sharp engagements. The Union Cavalry leader succeeded, however, in destroying a considerable length of track on both the Weldon and South side railroads between June 22d and 27th. Then he turned for the works at Petersburg, but found it a difficult task. The woods were alive with Confederates. Infantry swarmed on every hand. Cavalry hung on th
Losses: Union, 5 killed, 20 wounded. May 5-17, 1864: Kautz's Cavalry raid from Suffolk to city Point, Va. Union, 5t 400 killed, 2000 wounded, 100 missing. May 12-17, 1864: Kautz's raid on Petersburg and Lynchburg Railroad, Va. Union,1864: Petersburg, Va. Union, portion of Tenth Corps and Kautz's Cav.; Confed., Gen. R. E. Colston's command. Losses, 1864: Wilson's raid on the Weldon Railroad, Va. Union, Kautz's and Wilson's Cav.; Confed., Gen. W. H. F. Lee's Cav. e, Weldon Railroad, Va. Union, Fifth and Ninth Corps and Kautz's and Gregg's Cav.; Confed., Gen. A. P. Hill's corps, Bur Laurel Hill, Va. Union, Tenth and Eighteenth Corps and Kautz's Cav.; Confed., Gen. R. S. Ewell's command, supported ber 7-13, 1864: Darbytown Road Va. Union, Tenth Corps and Kautz's Cav.; Confed., troops of Gen. R. E. Lee's command. 64: Fair Oaks, Va. Union, Tenth and Eighteenth Corps and Kautz's Cav.; Confed., Gen. Longstreet's command. Losses:
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 6.34 (search)
in person, Grant and His Campaigns, p. 348. on the evening of the 14th, and being reinforced by Kautz's Division of Cavalry and Hink's Division of Negro Infantry, was at once directed to cross the Aiver was effected during the same night, and early on the 15th, Smith advanced in three columns, Kautz with his horsemen covering his left. Now Hancock's entire corps had been ferried to the south s 8,000 men in all, but this seems, on Investigation, an over-estimate. consisting of his own and Kautz's divisions, was dispatched to destroy the Weldon road farther to the south, and thence, by a wito the Southside road. Here, while tearing up the rails at Blacks-and-whites, having dispatched Kautz, meanwhile, to destroy the junction of the Southside and Danville roads at Burkeville, he was shispatch, June 25th, 1864. Wilson reached Meherrin Station on the Danville road the same day, and Kautz having rejoined him, the two columns pushed on rapidly to Staunton River Bridge. But the local
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Official diary of First corps, A. N. V., while commanded by Lt.-General R. H. Anderson, from June 1st to October 18, 1864. (search)
he New Market road and Law is posted in the salient on the Darbytown road. October 2 Law and Montague are moved back to Chaffin's farm. October 3, 4, 5 No change of note. October 6 No change during the day. At night Field and Hoke are taken out of the trenches and sent to the vicinity of Curry's house, on the Darbytown road. Law's brigade was previously sent over to Gary. October 7 At sunrise we move down the Darbytown road with Field and Hoke. The former encounters Kautz's cavalry in the exterior trenches. With Anderson's and Bratton's brigades and Gary and Law on the Charles City road, the cavalry is drawn off, leaving us nine pieces of artillery, ten caissons and prisoners. Field's division is then thrown to the left, on the outside of the exterior line, and Hoke on the inside of it. After crossing a thick abatis and an almost impenetrable swamp, the enemy is found in position near the New Market road. Field at once attacks him, and Major Johnson has a
Map: operations around Richmond and Petersburg. divisions up on their center, and driving them with disorder and with heavy loss. Several entire regiments, a battery, and many standards were captured when Hill, having checked the advance which was directed against the Weldon Railroad, withdrew with his captures to his former position, bringing with him the guns and nearly three thousand prisoners. On the same night a cavalry expedition, consisting of the divisions of Generals Wilson and Kautz, and numbering about six thousand men, was sent west to cut the Weldon, Southside, and Danville railroads, which connected our army with the south and west. This raid resulted in important injury to our communications. The enemy's cavalry tore up large distances of the tracks of all three of the railroads, burning the woodwork and laying waste the country around. But they were pursued and harassed by a small body of cavalry under General W. H. F. Lee, and on their return near Reams's Stat
der, 580-84, 587-88. Statements concerning Davis, 585-86. Colonel William Preston, 46, 589. Extract from letter of Gen. Gilmer, 51-52. Description of Gen. A. S. Johnston's death, 53-54. -Sherman convention, 587-88, 591, 592. Joinville, Prince de, 73, 87. Jones, Lt. Catesby ap R., 164, 165, 167, 168. General, D. R., 131, 273, 283, 303-06. General, J. K., 281. Jim (colored coachman), 595. John Paul, 235. H. M., 414-15. General Samuel, 356, 357. General W. E., 434, 445. K Kautz, General, 544. Kawles, Benjamin, 532. Kearney, General, 275. Kearsarge (ship), 214. Fight with the Alabama, 315-16. Kellogg, W. P., 642. Kemper, General, 103, 273. Kennon, Lt., Beverly, 185. Report of loss of Governor Moore, 186. Kent, Chancellor, 227. Kentucky, subversion of state government, 395-99. Kernstown, Battle of, 97. Kershaw, General, 131, 361, 451, 452-53, 454, 563, 564, 565. Keyes, General, 72, 105, 106. Kilpatrick, General, 423, 426, 539. Raid on Richmond, 424.
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 20: battle of the Wilderness (search)
move upon Staunton with about 9000 men and 24 guns. When Crook and Sigel had united, they were to move upon Lynchburg and thence upon Richmond. Fourth. Butler, at Fortress Monroe, was organizing the Army of the James, to move upon Richmond by its south bank. It would be escorted by four monitors, a fleet of gunboats, and a large collection of ferry-boats and river craft of every description. These would facilitate all movements by water. His force comprised the 10th and 18th corps and Kautz's cavalry, 30,000 men with 79 guns, of which about 5000 were cavalry. Besides these four armies, there were, near Washington, about 40,000 troops which were used for reenforcements during the next two months, besides a constant stream of recruits from all over the North, stimulated by bounties now being paid of a thousand dollars per man, and, early in July, Grant also brought around from New Orleans the 19th corps, about 12,000 men. There were no returns of Longstreet's corps after his
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 21: the movement against Petersburg (search)
White House, where it took transports for City Point, and was landed there the night of the 14th. Here it was joined by Kautz's cavalry, about 2400 strong, and by Hink's colored division, 3700, making in all about 16,000 men, who were ordered to man of Mexico, and Gen. R. E. Colston, disabled at Chancellorsville, had acted with great gallantry in repelling a raid by Kautz's cavalry. The total gross of all arms is given as 2738. After Beauregard's staff-officer had left him, Lee gave ordech of reenforcements to both sides, and he thought it wiser to hold what he had, than to venture more and risk disaster. Kautz's cavalry had been kept beyond the intrenchments all day by Dearing's cavalry and a few guns, which fired from the redans in the vicinity of No. 28. About 6 P. M., hearing no sounds of battle from Smith, Kautz withdrew, with a loss of 43 men, and went into bivouac. After the fighting began, Beauregard had recognized that he would need every available man to defen
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