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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 22: the Mine (search)
Chapter 22: the Mine The Petersburg trenches. Wilson and Kautz's cavalry raid. their rout on the 29th. Early's demonstration toward Washington. the Mine at the Elliott salient. extent of the tunnel and galleries. its ventilation. ting that the enemy would here begin soon to make zigzag approaches as in a siege. On June 22, Grant sent Wilson's and Kautz's divisions of cavalry upon a raid against the Lynchburg and Danville railroads. On the same day, the 2d and 6th corps w lines from which it had been driven and the 6th corps formed on its left obliquely toward the Weldon road. Wilson and Kautz were followed in their raid by W. H. F. Lee's division of cavalry which, however, was unable to prevent the tearing up ofby W. H. F. Lee's, which had continued in the pursuit, and by two brigades of infantry under Mahone, fell upon Wilson and Kautz on the 29th at Ream's Station and routed them with the loss of 1500 killed, wounded, and captured, and all of their artil
across the Appomattox, by a pontoon-bridge at Point of Rocks, in a movement against Petersburg. The attack itself was made by a body about 5000 strong, chiefly of Kautz's mounted infantry, and was successfully repulsed. Had Gillmore's large force been handled with more vigor, Petersburg, with the handful of men then available forre was a pontoon-bridge already established, by which he crossed during that night and moved at once upon Petersburg, Ibid., p. 500. having been reinforced with Kautz's cavalry and Hink's division of colored troops, making his force, as already said, 22,000 strong. At this critical juncture General Beauregard had, for the imme such that cavalry could ride over them—a representation, says Mr. Swinton (Army of the Potomac, p. 502), that did not turn out to be justified by experience; for Kautz, who, with his mounted division, essayed to work his way round on the left, found himself completely estopped by a heavy fire; and in front the approaches were dis
lem plank road, and soon formed a junction with a division (Griffin's) of the 5th Corps, which had been posted on the east side. The other corps (the 6th) came up during the night, taking position on the left and rear of the 2d; and Wilson's and Kautz's cavalry were then sent to cut the Weldon and Southside railroads. General Lee divined the intention of the enemy, and countermovements were immediately ordered to thwart his purpose. By some misunderstanding between the Federal officers com left, with no further advantage to him. During the several weeks that followed the regular investment of Petersburg cavalry raids were organized to cut and destroy the various railroads by which supplies were brought to our army. Wilson and Kautz, acting separately, succeeded in tearing up and otherwise damaging many miles of very important roads, including the Weldon, at Reams's Station, the Southside and the Danville roads. The raiding columns then formed a junction at Meherrin Station
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, District of Columbia Volunteers. (search)
, 1864. (8 Cos. organized at Augusta, Me., January to March, 1864, and ordered to report at Norfolk, Va.) 1st Brigade, Kautz's Cavalry Division, Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, to June, 1864. 2nd Brigade, Kautz's Cavalry Division, Dept. Kautz's Cavalry Division, Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, to January, 1865. 2nd Brigade, Cavalry Division, Dept. of Virginia, to August, 1865. Cavalry, Dept. of Virginia, to October, 1865. Service. Duty in the Defenses of Washington, D. C., till January, 1864. North Carolina, and on duty at Yorktown, and a portion of the Regiment at Portsmouth, Va., dismounted, till May, 1864. Kautz's Raid on Petersburg & Weldon R. R. May 5-11, 1864. Double Bridges May 5. Stony Creek Station May 7. White's Bridge, Nottaway Creek and Nottaway R. R. Bridge May 8. White's Bridge May 9, Kautz's Raid on Richmond & Danville R. R. May 12-17. Belcher's Mills May 16. Petersburg June 9. Assaults on Petersburg June 15-19. Siege operations against Pet
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, New York Volunteers. (search)
ginia and North Carolina, to October, 1864. 3rd Brigade, Kautz's Cavalry Division, Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, tirginia and North Carolina, to April, 1864. 1st Brigade, Kautz's Cavalry Division, Army of the James, Dept. of Virginia an Bottom's Bridge and Baltimore Cross Roads February 7. Kautz's Raid against Petersburg & Weldon Railroad May 5-11. Waridge May 8. White's Bridge, Nottaway River, May 8-9. Kautz's Raid on Richmond & Danville Railroad May 12-17. Flat Cinia and North Carolina, to December, 1864. 1st Brigade, Kautz's Cavalry Division, Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, tuty at Portsmouth, Va., till June, 1865. (1 Section with Kautz's Cavalry Division May-June, 1864, participating in Butler'ames River and against Petersburg and Richmond May 3-28. Kautz's Raid from Suffolk against Petersburg & Weldon Railroad Ma May 8. Jarrett's Station and Nottaway River May 8-9. Kautz's Raid on Richmond & Danville Railroad May 12-17. Flat C
Organized at Cleveland and Camp Dennison, Ohio, August to October, 1861. Duty at Camp Dennison, Ohio, November 1, 1861, to January 27, 1862. Scout duty on the Missouri Border January 27-February 18, 1862. Attached to Doubleday's Brigade, Dept. of Missouri, February to June, 1862. Fort Scott, Kan., to August, 1862. Solomon's Brigade, Dept. of Kansas, to October, 1862. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, Army of the Frontier, to December, 1862. Columbus, Ohio, to April, 1863. Kautz's 1st Cavalry Brigade, District of Central Kentucky, Dept. Ohio, to June, 1863. 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, 23rd Army Corps, Army of the Ohio, to August, 1863. 3rd Brigade, 4th Division, 23rd Army Corps, to November, 1863. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division Cavalry, 23rd Army Corps, to February, 1864. Columbus, Ohio, to April, 1864. Cavalry, 9th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to May 24, 1864. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac, and Middle Military Divisio
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Pennsylvania Volunteers. (search)
Division, Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, Army of the James, to May, 1864. 1st Brigade, Kautz's Cavalry Division, Dept. Virginia and North Carolina, to April, 1865. Cavalry Brigade, Dept. Creek March 2. Reconnoissance from Portsmouth to the Blackwater April 13-15 (Detachment). Kautz's Raid on Petersburg & Weldon Railroad May 5-11. Birch Island Bridges May 5. Stony Creek Sidge, Nottaway Creek, May 8. Nottaway Railroad Bridge May 8. Jarrett's Station May 8-9. Kautz's Raid on Richmond & Danville Railroad May 12-17. Coalfield Station May 13. Powhatan Stati Butler's operations on south side of the James and against Petersburg and Richmond May 4-28. Kautz's Raid on Petersburg & Weldon Railroad and to City Point, Va., May 5-11. Birch Island Bridgesdge May 9. (Cos. B and H to Headquarters 18th Corps May 4; Co. H there till September 28.) Kautz's Raid on Richmond & Danville Railroad May 12-17. Flat Creek Bridge, near Chula Depot, May 14
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, United States--Regular Army. (search)
t, S. C., 10th Army Corps, Dept. South, to March, 1863. District Hilton Head, S. C., 10th Corps, to July, 1863. Morris Island, S. C., 10th Corps, to September, 1863. Folly Island, S. C., Gordon's Division, 10th Corps, to January, 1864. District Hilton Head, S. C., 10th Corps, to February, 1864. Light Brigade, District Forida, Dept. South, to April, 1864. 2nd Division, 10th Army Corps, Army of the James, to May, 1864. Artillery Brigade, 10th Army Corps, to June, 1864. Kautz's Cavalry Division, Dept. Virginia and North Carolina, to July, 1864. Artillery Brigade, 18th Corps, to December, 1864. Artillery Brigade, 24th Army Corps, to August, 1865. Service. Duty at Fort Taylor, Key West, Florida, till June, 1862. Moved to Hilton Head, S. C., thence to Beaufort, S. C., June 18-21, and duty there till March 20, 1863. Expedition to destroy Charleston & Savannah Railroad October 21-24. Battle of Pocotaligo, S. C., October 22. Moved to Hilton Head
lmore. 28. General Wallace. 29. General Garfield. 30. General Schofield. 31. General Sheridan. 32. General Kilpatrick 33. General Custer 34. General Buford 35. General Merritt 36. General Averill 37. General Torbert. 38. General Sedgwick. 39. General McPHERSON. 40. General Reynolds. 41. General Wadsworth. 42. General Sumner. 43. General Kearney. 44. General Lyon 45. General Birney. 46. General Mitchell. 47. General Reno. 48. General Grierson 49. General Rousseau. 51. General Wilson. 51. General Kautz. 52. General Stoneman. 63. General Pleasonton. u4. General Gregg. 56. Vice Admiral Farragut. 56. Rear Admiral Porter. 57. rear Admiral Foote. 58. rear Admiral Du Pont. 59 rear Admiral Dahlgren. 60 rear Admiral Goldsborough. 61 Commodore Winslow. 62. Lieutenant-commander Cushing. 63. General R. E. Lee. 64. General Stonewall Jackson. 66. General Ewell. 66. General Beauregard. 67. General Longstreet. 68. General Breckinridge. 69. General A. P. Hill. 70. General Fitzhugh Lee. 71. Colonel Mo
lmore. 28. General Wallace. 29. General Garfield. 30. General Schofield. 31. General Sheridan. 32. General Kilpatrick 33. General Custer 34. General Buford 35. General Merritt 36. General Averill 37. General Torbert. 38. General Sedgwick. 39. General McPHERSON. 40. General Reynolds. 41. General Wadsworth. 42. General Sumner. 43. General Kearney. 44. General Lyon 45. General Birney. 46. General Mitchell. 47. General Reno. 48. General Grierson 49. General Rousseau. 51. General Wilson. 51. General Kautz. 52. General Stoneman. 63. General Pleasonton. u4. General Gregg. 56. Vice Admiral Farragut. 56. Rear Admiral Porter. 57. rear Admiral Foote. 58. rear Admiral Du Pont. 59 rear Admiral Dahlgren. 60 rear Admiral Goldsborough. 61 Commodore Winslow. 62. Lieutenant-commander Cushing. 63. General R. E. Lee. 64. General Stonewall Jackson. 66. General Ewell. 66. General Beauregard. 67. General Longstreet. 68. General Breckinridge. 69. General A. P. Hill. 70. General Fitzhugh Lee. 71. Colonel Mo
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