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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 38 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 33 3 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 32 2 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 24 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 20 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 18 0 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 14 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 11 1 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 11 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative. You can also browse the collection for Kautz or search for Kautz in all documents.

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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 20: battle of the Wilderness (search)
move upon Staunton with about 9000 men and 24 guns. When Crook and Sigel had united, they were to move upon Lynchburg and thence upon Richmond. Fourth. Butler, at Fortress Monroe, was organizing the Army of the James, to move upon Richmond by its south bank. It would be escorted by four monitors, a fleet of gunboats, and a large collection of ferry-boats and river craft of every description. These would facilitate all movements by water. His force comprised the 10th and 18th corps and Kautz's cavalry, 30,000 men with 79 guns, of which about 5000 were cavalry. Besides these four armies, there were, near Washington, about 40,000 troops which were used for reenforcements during the next two months, besides a constant stream of recruits from all over the North, stimulated by bounties now being paid of a thousand dollars per man, and, early in July, Grant also brought around from New Orleans the 19th corps, about 12,000 men. There were no returns of Longstreet's corps after his
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 21: the movement against Petersburg (search)
White House, where it took transports for City Point, and was landed there the night of the 14th. Here it was joined by Kautz's cavalry, about 2400 strong, and by Hink's colored division, 3700, making in all about 16,000 men, who were ordered to man of Mexico, and Gen. R. E. Colston, disabled at Chancellorsville, had acted with great gallantry in repelling a raid by Kautz's cavalry. The total gross of all arms is given as 2738. After Beauregard's staff-officer had left him, Lee gave ordech of reenforcements to both sides, and he thought it wiser to hold what he had, than to venture more and risk disaster. Kautz's cavalry had been kept beyond the intrenchments all day by Dearing's cavalry and a few guns, which fired from the redans in the vicinity of No. 28. About 6 P. M., hearing no sounds of battle from Smith, Kautz withdrew, with a loss of 43 men, and went into bivouac. After the fighting began, Beauregard had recognized that he would need every available man to defen
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 22: the Mine (search)
Chapter 22: the Mine The Petersburg trenches. Wilson and Kautz's cavalry raid. their rout on the 29th. Early's demonstration toward Washington. the Mine at the Elliott salient. extent of the tunnel and galleries. its ventilation. ting that the enemy would here begin soon to make zigzag approaches as in a siege. On June 22, Grant sent Wilson's and Kautz's divisions of cavalry upon a raid against the Lynchburg and Danville railroads. On the same day, the 2d and 6th corps w lines from which it had been driven and the 6th corps formed on its left obliquely toward the Weldon road. Wilson and Kautz were followed in their raid by W. H. F. Lee's division of cavalry which, however, was unable to prevent the tearing up ofby W. H. F. Lee's, which had continued in the pursuit, and by two brigades of infantry under Mahone, fell upon Wilson and Kautz on the 29th at Ream's Station and routed them with the loss of 1500 killed, wounded, and captured, and all of their artil