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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 250 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for P. Kearny or search for P. Kearny in all documents.

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nd occupied by the troops of Gens. Couch's and Kearny's division, and such troops of Gen. Casey's aso report their names. Couch's, Casey's, and Kearny's divisions on the field numbered but eighteenr upon Bristow. This latter order was sent to Kearny to render my right at Bristow perfectly secureretired. I immediately pushed forward Hooker, Kearny, and Reno upon Centreville, and sent orders to. Late in the afternoon of the twenty-eighth, Kearny drove the enemy's rear-guard out of Centrevillfor the purpose of preventing this, I directed Kearny to keep closely in contact with him during theBull Run, August 28, 1862, 9.50 P. M. Major-Gen. Kearny: General: Gen. McDowell has intercepted preparing a new attack against our centre, General Kearny arrived on the field of battle and deployeA. M., when an officer announced to me that Gen. Kearny had arrived on the battle field, and desireave the field. On my right, however, where Gen. Kearny had taken position, all remained quiet, and[56 more...]
rived at Kelly's Ford, and the division of General Kearny, four thousand five hundred strong, which r upon Bristow. This latter order was sent to Kearny to render my right at Bristow perfectly securefor the purpose of preventing this, I directed Kearny to keep closely in contact with him during thewas soon joined by the divisions of Hooker and Kearny. Jackson fell back several miles, but was so t most earnest and accomplished soldier, Major-Gen. Kearny. In him the country has suffered a losse commanders of the divisions of his corps (Gens. Kearny and Hooker) have that place in the public eer to defend our right, I sent a letter to General Kearny, saying that Longstreet was not able to brd pass more to the right and join those of General Kearny on our extreme right, and direct his attacA. M., when an officer announced to me that Gen. Kearny had arrived on the battle field, and desirerst Corps, Army of Virginia. Report of General Kearny. headquarters First division, Third c[42 more...]
nce, to inflict severe loss upon our troops. At this juncture Gen. Kearny, who had been ordered at two o'clock to move to Reno's support, hrough which the rebels were advancing, unknown to our forces. General Kearny ordered General Birney to move his brigade still further to the Most unfortunately, the latter were already so far forward that Gen. Kearny suddenly found himself within their lines, and was captured befo. A heavy fire was kept up for half an hour. From the time when Kearny came on the field a fierce thunder-storm had been raging, and the re exposed. He had no means of strengthening it till the arrival of Kearny. Most of the battle was fought in darkness and storm. The thunders dearly bought by the death of Gen. Stevens and the capture of General Kearny. The military career of both is well known to the country. GeGen. Kearny brought away from the Peninsula a very high reputation. His services are too recent to have been forgotten. Gen. Stevens's conn