Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 4: The Cavalry (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Phil Kearny or search for Phil Kearny in all documents.

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their revolvers on the principle that two arms suffice — the carbine for long distance, the saber for hand-to-hand fighting. it will show that eighty-five years of great and small wars, Indian fighting, and frontier service, proved to be a training school in which the methods followed by Sheridan, Stuart, Forrest, and others of their time had been really initiated by their famous predecessors — Marion, the Swamp Fox, and Light horse Harry Lee of the War for Independence, Charlie May and Phil Kearny of the Mexican War, and those old-time dragoons and Indian fighters, Harney and Cooke. Before the Revolution of 1776, the colonists were generally armed with, and proficient in the use of, the rifle — of long barrel and generous bore — and familiarity with the broken and wooded surface of the country made them formidable opponents of the British from the start, who both in tactical methods and armament were very inferior to the American patriots. Fortescue, an English writer, records
alf bred mare by Mambrino. He was of a rich chestnut color, stood nearly seventeen hands high, and had long slender legs. Despite his great height, the horse was known to trot a mile in two minutes and forty-five seconds. When the battle of Chattanooga occurred, the horse was seven years old. It was here that the animal received its name of Lookout. The grandeur of Lookout's stride and his height dwarfed many gallant war-horses and he has been termed the finest charger in the army. General Kearny's horses General Philip Kearny was a veteran of the Mexican War, with the rank of captain. It had been decided to equip Kearny's troop (First United States Dragoons) with horses all of the same color, and he went to Illinois to purchase them. He was assisted in the work by Abraham Lincoln and finally found himself in possession of one hundred gray horses. While engaged in battle before the City of Mexico, mounted upon one of the newly purchased grays, Monmouth, Kearny was When s