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James Russell Lowell, Among my books 43 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 22 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 20 0 Browse Search
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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life, Chapter 2: a Keats manuscript (search)
t. Let us now see, by actual comparison, how one of Keats's yachts came in. There lies before me a photograph of the first two stanzas of Keats's Ode on Melancholy as they stood when first written. The manuscript pageontaining them was given to John Howard Payne by George Keats, the poet's brother, who lived for many years atindly given me a photograph of it. The verses are in Keats's well-known and delicate handwriting, and exhibit athe exhaustive sense of wealth belonging so often to Keats's poetry; and seems to match the full ecstasy of colanges are happily accepted in the common editions of Keats; but these editions make two errors that are correctve been preserved for us. It will be remembered that Keats himself once wrote in a letter that his fondest pray, printed by Milnes, was written Oct. 29, 1818. George Keats died about 1851, and his youngest daughter, Isab color to English words. To be brought thus near to Keats suggests that poem by Browning where he compares a m
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life, Chapter 4: a world outside of science (search)
be an intellectual world outside of science, where is the boundary-line of that world? We pass that boundary, it would seem, whenever we enter the realm usually called intuitive or inspirational; a realm whose characteristic it is that it is not subject to processes or measurable by tests. The yield of this other world may be as real as that of the scientific world, but its methods are not traceable, nor are its achievements capable of being duplicated by the mere force of patient will. Keats, in one of his fine letters, classifies the universe, and begins boldly with things real, as sun, moon, and passages of Shakespeare. Sun and moon lie within the domain of science; and at this moment the astronomers are following out that extraordinary discovery which has revealed in the bright star Algol a system of three and perhaps four stellar bodies, revolving round each other and influencing each other's motions, and this at a distance so great that the rays of light which reveal them
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises, chapter 4 (search)
t. Let us now see, by actual comparison, how one of Keats's yachts came in. There lies before me a photograph of the first two stanzas of Keats's Ode on melancholy, as they stood when just written. The manuscript pageontaining them was given to John Howard Payne by George Keats, the poet's brother, who lived for many years atindly given me a photograph of it. The verses are in Keats's well-known and delicate handwriting, and exhibit athe exhaustive sense of wealth belonging so often to Keats's poetry, and seems to match the full ecstasy of colanges are happily accepted in the common editions of Keats; but these editions make two errors that are correctve been preserved for us. It will be remembered that Keats himself once wrote in a letter that his fondest prayrinted by Milnes, was written October 29, 1818. George Keats died about 1851, and his youngest daughter, Isab color to English words. To be brought thus near to Keats suggests that poem by Browning where he speaks of a
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises, XIV. one of Thackeray's women (search)
t really guess within fifteen years how old she was, and strangers placed her anywhere from sixty to eighty. Her modest cottage, full of old furniture and pictures, was the resort of much that was fashionable on the days of her weekly receptions; costly equipages might be seen before the door; and if, during any particular season, she suspected a falling off in visitors, she would try some new device,--a beautiful girl sitting in a certain carved armchair beneath an emblazoned window, like Keats's Madeline, -or, when things grew desperate, a bench with a milk-pan and a pumpkin on the piazza, to give an innocently rural air. My dear, she said on that occasion, I must try something: rusticity is the dodge for me ; and so the piazza looked that summer like a transformation scene in Cinderella, with the fairy godmother not far off. She inherited from her father in full the Bohemian temperament, and cultivated it so habitually through life that it was in full flower at a time when alm
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises, chapter 20 (search)
or the surgery; it was not so painful as I supposed. I bring you others, as you ask, though they might not differ. While my thought is undressed, I can make the distinction; but when I put them in the gown, they look alike and numb. You asked how old I was? I made no verse, but one or two, until this winter, sir. I had a terror since September, I could tell to none; and so I sing, as the boy does of the burying ground, because I am afraid. You inquire my books. For poets, I have Keats, and Mr. and Mrs. Browning. For prose, Mr. Ruskin, Sir Thomas Browne, and the Revelations. I went to school, but in your manner of the phrase had no education. When a little girl, I had a friend who taught me Immortality; but venturing too near, himself, he never returned. Soon after my tutor died, and for several years my lexicon was my only companion. Then I found one more, but he was not contented I be his scholar, so he left the land. You ask of my companions. Hills, sir, and t
James Russell Lowell, Among my books, Keats. (search)
afty, of Craven Street, Finsbury, assures Mr. George Keats, when he tells her that John is determinel Ballads. It is idle to attempt to show that Keats did not suffer keenly from the vulgarities of it to be thrown by a scullion in a garret. Keats, as his was a temperament in which sensibilityby which the world looks for and finds merit. Keats longed for fame, but longed above all to deserrest. You cannot make a good adjective out of Keats,— the more pity,— and to say a thing is Keatsyortune likes fine names. Haydon tells us that Keats was very much depressed by the fortunes of hismanners, but was simply impossible to a man of Keats's temperament. On the whole, perhaps, we ne built on this plan, and especially poets like Keats, in whom the moral seems to have so perfectly othing for it but to cry for restful Death. Keats, to all appearance, accepted his ill fortune cr mental graces that should attract a man like Keats. His intellect was satisfied and absorbed by [12 more...]<