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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 26 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 13, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for A. M. Keiley or search for A. M. Keiley in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Not afraid of Yanks. (search)
eld all day with the hot sun beating down upon them, and I truly commisserated their lot. In the same tent with us were two ill-favored looking chaps, deserters from Wise's brigade. They informed me they had come over two days before. Doubtless Butler derived much information from them as to the defenceless condition of the town. During the day Butler sent for some of our party and Mr. A. M. Keiley, B. T. Archer and one or two others came up to his tent, where he interviewed them. Mr. Keiley in his book In Vinculus, has given a full account of his conversation with the general. Butler in his letter to General Gilmore thus refers to this interview: You made no such demonstration as caused any alarm in Petersburg until nine o'clock, as is evidenced by the fact that General Kautz's command captured a school-master whom I have examined, who was in his school in Petersburg after nine o'clock when the first alarm was given. It is an interesting coincidence that the school-master
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Nail-Kag hat. (search)
Nail-Kag hat. One of our party was conspicuous by being the proud possessor of a high-crowned beaver. He was the grenadier of the party. Mr. Keiley, in his book, makes mention of an amusing circumstance connected with the owner of the headgear in question. He had incautiously stepped over the dead line of the prison pen, when he was hailed by the negro guard from the parapet, White man, ef you don't get back over dat line I'll blow dat ar nail kag offen top of you head. It is hardly necessary to say the proprietor of the nail kag beat a hasty retreat. The following morning we were again placed on board a steamer, arriving late in the afternoon at Point Lookout. We disembarked on the wharf, where we remained all night without any shelter, exposed to the bitter blast coming up the bay, cutting into our very vitals. It was by long odds the roughest treatment we received. Though it was the month of June, it was very cold and we suffered much; sometimes we would lay down clo