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C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 28 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 23 5 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 17 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 16 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 15 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 8 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 5 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Lawrence M. Keitt or search for Lawrence M. Keitt in all documents.

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nd perils — appealed, in view of his comparative youth for a Presidential candidate, with resistless fascination, to the noble young men of our country; while his silence and patience throughout the canvass, under a perfect tempest of preposterous yet annoying calumnies, had contributed to widen the circle of his admirers and friends. A most wanton and brutal personal assault May 22, 1856. on Senator Sumner, of Massachusetts, by Representative Brooks of South Carolina, abetted by Representatives Keitt, of South Carolina, and Edmundson, of Virginia, doubt-less contributed also to swell the Republican vote of the following Autumn. Mr. Sumner had made an elaborate speech in the Senate on the Kansas question — a speech not without grave faults of conception and of style, but nowise obnoxious to the charge of violating the decencies of debate by unjustifiable personalities. Yet, on the assumption that its author had therein unwarrantably assailed and ridiculed Judge Butler--one of So
e to that point where we may say, the matter is entirely right. Mr. Inglis said: Mr. President, if there is any gentleman present who wishes to debate this matter, of course this body will hear him. But, as to delay for the purpose of discussion, I, for one am opposed to it. As my friend (Mr. Parker) has said, most of us have had this matter under consideration for the last twenty years; and I presume that we have, by this time, arrived at a decision upon the subject. And Hon. Lawrence M. Keitt-- I have been engaged in this movement ever since I entered political life. I am content with what has been done to-day, and with what will take place to-morrow. We have carried the body of this Union to its last resting-place, and now we will drop the flag over its grave. After that is done, I am ready to adjourn, and leave the remaining ceremonies for to-morrow. And Mr. Robert Barnwell Rhett-- The Secession of South Carolina is not an event of a day. It is not anything
West Virginia. Kane, Judge John I., letter to from Polk, 169; his decision in the case of Euphemia Williams, 216. Kane, George P., Marshal of the Baltimore Police, 421; puts a stop to the riot at Baltimore, 464; his dispatch to Bradley T. Johnson, 465; is sent to Fort McHenry by Gen. Butler, 529. Kansas, the Nebraska-Kansas struggle, 224 to 251; admitted as a State, 251. (See John Brown, Border Ruffians, etc.) Kearsarge, U. S. Gunboat, blockades the Sumter at Gibraltar, 602. Keitt, Lawrence M., of S. C., an abettor of the assault on Sumner, 299; in Secession Convention, 345. Kelley, Col., of W. Va., in command of Camp Carlile, Ohio, 520; crosses to Wheeling, 522; is wounded at Philippi, 522; captures Romney, etc., 527. Kelly, William, at Tweddle Hall, 388. Kendall, Amos, to P. M. at Charleston, 129. Kentucky, 17; slave population in 1790, 36; unanimously devoted to Jefferson, etc., 83; the Resolutions of ‘98, 83; withdrawal of delegates from the Douglas Co